Cressie

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Cressie
Cressie comparison.PNG

An artist's interpretation of Cressie, shown next to a woman for comparison.
GroupingLocal legend
Sub groupingLake monster
First reportedEarly 1900s
CountryCanada
RegionCrescent Lake
HabitatWater
 
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Cressie
Cressie comparison.PNG

An artist's interpretation of Cressie, shown next to a woman for comparison.
GroupingLocal legend
Sub groupingLake monster
First reportedEarly 1900s
CountryCanada
RegionCrescent Lake
HabitatWater

Cressie is a mysterious, eel-like creature which is reputed to lurk in the depths of Crescent Lake in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

History[edit]

The creature was first reported in ancient Native Canadian legends, in which it was referred to as "Woodum Haoot" (Pond Devil) or "Haoot Tuwedyee" (Swimming Demon). It was feared by the local residents of the lakeside, but reports of it by the settlers only began in the early 20th century.

In the 1950s, two men saw what they thought was an upturned boat heading upwind, but upon approaching it, it flipped itself around again and dived below the lake. In the 80's a pilot crashed and drowned in Crescent Lake, and while two scuba divers attempted to retrieve his body, they were attacked by a school of uncommonly large eels, and were forced to retreat. Other sightings have included an incident in July, 1991, when a "Cressie" was seen swimming on the lake's surface, and in the summer of 2003, when a woman saw the creature swimming again.

Mythology[edit]

In indigenous folklore, a Cressie is a trickster, a shapeshifter able to appear to men as a seductively beautiful female. She would lure them into the depths, and fill their minds with lurid images. Cressie was both feared and revered as a spiritual being, able to transcend to the upper and lower realms at will, bestowing both vengeance and grace upon humans.

Description[edit]

The creature's length varies, but could be from 5'4 to 15' feet long and "as thick as a man's thigh".

Sources[edit]