Crataegus pinnatifida

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Crataegus pinnatifida
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Plantae
(unranked):Angiosperms
(unranked):Eudicots
(unranked):Rosids
Order:Rosales
Family:Rosaceae
Genus:Crataegus
Series:Pinnatifidae
(Zabel ex C.K.Schneid) Rehder[1]
Species:C. pinnatifida
Binomial name
Crataegus pinnatifida
Bunge
 
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Crataegus pinnatifida
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Plantae
(unranked):Angiosperms
(unranked):Eudicots
(unranked):Rosids
Order:Rosales
Family:Rosaceae
Genus:Crataegus
Series:Pinnatifidae
(Zabel ex C.K.Schneid) Rehder[1]
Species:C. pinnatifida
Binomial name
Crataegus pinnatifida
Bunge

Crataegus pinnatifida, also known as Chinese hawthorn, Chinese Hawberry,[2][3] or shānzhā (Chinese: 山楂/山查 or 山楂果/山查果 literally means "mountain hawthorn" or "mountain hawberry"), refers to a small to a medium-sized tree as well as the fruit of the tree. The fruit is bright red, 1.5 inches in diameter.

Contents

Use

Culinary use

In northern Chinese cuisine, ripe Crataegus pinnatifida fruits are used in the dessert tanghulu. It is also used to make the traditional haw flakes, as well as candied fruit slices, jam, jelly and wine.

Medicinal use

Several species of hawthorn are used in naturopathic medicine and traditional Chinese medicine, primarily to strengthen cardiac output, and scientific evidence is accumulating of the potential pharmacological effects of chemical compounds isolated from plants in the genus Crataegus. The dried fruits of Crataegus pinnatifida (called shān zhā (traditional Chinese: 山楂, simplified Chinese: 山楂)) are used primarily as a digestive aid.[4] Recent research has shown that polyphenols derived from the fruit of the tree have anti-tumor activities on skin, indicating a potential use in preventing skin cancer.[5]

Notes

  1. ^ Phipps, J.B.; Robertson, K.R.; Smith, P.G.; Rohrer, J.R. (1990). A checklist of the subfamily Maloideae (Rosaceae). Canadian Journal of Botany. 68(10): 2209–2269.
  2. ^ Hummer, K.E.; Janick, J. (2008). Folta, Kevin M.; Gardiner, Susan E.. ed. Genetics and genomics of Rosaceae. New York: Springer. p. 11. ISBN 978-0-387-77490-9.
  3. ^ Flint, Harrison L. (1997). Landscape plants for eastern North America : esclusive of Florida and the immediate Gulf Coast. New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 158. ISBN 978-0-471-59919-7.
  4. ^ Dharmananda S. (2004). Hawthorn (Crataegus). Food and Medicine in China.. January. Institute of Traditional Medicine Online. http://www.itmonline.org/arts/crataegus.htm.
  5. ^ Kao, Erl-Shyh; Wang, CJ; Lin, WL; Chu, CY; Tseng, TH; Chau-Jong Wang, Wea-Lung Lin, Chia-Yih Chu, Tsui-Hwa Tseng (2007). "Effects of polyphenols derived from fruit of Crataegus pinnatifida on cell transformation, dermal edema and skin tumor formation by phorbol ester application". Food and Chemical Toxicology (Elsevier) 45 (10): 1795–1804. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2007.03.016. PMID 17493734.

See also