Craig Ramsay

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Craig Ramsay
20140927-CraigRamsay2.jpg
Ramsay at the 2014 Edmonton Oilers training camp
Born(1951-03-17) March 17, 1951 (age 63)
Weston, ON, CAN
Height5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
PositionLeft Wing
ShotLeft
Played forBuffalo Sabres
NHL Draft19th overall, 1971
Buffalo Sabres
Playing career1971–1985
 
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Craig Ramsay
20140927-CraigRamsay2.jpg
Ramsay at the 2014 Edmonton Oilers training camp
Born(1951-03-17) March 17, 1951 (age 63)
Weston, ON, CAN
Height5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
PositionLeft Wing
ShotLeft
Played forBuffalo Sabres
NHL Draft19th overall, 1971
Buffalo Sabres
Playing career1971–1985

Craig Ramsay (born March 17, 1951) is an assistant coach of the Edmonton Oilers, and former retired Canadian professional ice hockey left winger who played in the NHL from 1971 to 1985 and the final head coach of the Atlanta Thrashers.[1] He is currently an assistant coach with the Edmonton Oilers.

Playing career[edit]

Craig Ramsay began his hockey career with the Peterborough Petes in 1968. Ramsay spent four seasons in Peterborough where he excelled at the game. He caught the attention of many scouts and in 1971 he was drafted 19th overall by the Buffalo Sabres in the 1971 NHL Amateur Draft. In 1971–72, Ramsay played a couple of games in the American Hockey League before being called up by the Sabres. He was paired up with his close friend Don Luce and together, the two formed a formidable offensive-defensive line that shut out many of the NHL's top lines. In 1974–75, the Sabres drafted young prospect Danny Gare and he was paired up with Ramsay and Luce. The Sabres that year made it all the way to the Stanley Cup Finals before being defeated by the Philadelphia Flyers. Ramsay had a total tally of 12 points during that run. With the addition of Danny Gare, Ramsay's line became not only a threat defensively but also offensively. Ramsay had eight consecutive 20 goal seasons and was selected to play in the 1976 NHL All-Star Game. His linemate, Gare scored a total of 56 goals in 1979–80. Ramsay played for ten seasons for the Sabres which included playing 776 games consecutively. In 1984–85, Ramsay was awarded the Frank J. Selke Trophy for his defensive capabilities as a forward. Ramsay retired shortly afterwards ending a 14 year career with the Sabres which included 1,070 career NHL games, 252 goals and 420 assists for 672 points. He was inducted into the Buffalo Sabres Hall of Fame in 1986 to honor his playing career with the club.[2] Ramsay was the last player to play a full season without incurring any penalties. He did this in 1973–74, playing 78 games and recording 46 points.[3]

Coaching career[edit]

Following Ramsay's retirement, he was named the assistant coach for the Buffalo Sabres in 1986–87 and served as interim head coach late in the year posting a 4–15–2 record. He also served as the team director of player personnel and assistant general manager with the Sabres. In 1992–93, Ramsay left the Sabres organization and joined the Florida Panthers as assistant coach. He stayed there until 1995 before joining the Ottawa Senators also as an assistant coach.

In 1997–98, Ramsay joined the Philadelphia Flyers. He was named interim head coach in February 2000 for Roger Neilson who was being treated for cancer. Ramsay guided the team to a 16–8–1–0 mark while claiming the Atlantic Division with 105 points. He led the team all the way to the Eastern Conference Finals before being eliminated by the eventual Stanley Cup champions, New Jersey Devils. Neilson was dismissed by the Flyers for health reasons at the end of the 1999-00 NHL season and Ramsay started the 2000-2001 season as head coach before being fired after 28 games as the Flyers went 12–12–4–0 to start the season.

He joined the Tampa Bay Lightning in 2001 as an assistant coach. There, Ramsay won his first Stanley Cup ever in 2004 as the Lightning beat the Calgary Flames in seven games. In 2006–07, he joined the Boston Bruins as another assistant coach.[4] The Bruins made the playoffs every year and finished first in the Eastern Conference in 2008–09. On June 24, 2010, he was named the head coach for the Atlanta Thrashers. He was dismissed by the team's new ownership group, True North Sports and Entertainment following the Thrasher's relocation to Winnipeg, Manitoba.[5] Ramsay was appointed an assistant coach with the Florida Panthers under head coach Kevin Dineen following his dismissal from Atlanta. He was fired by the Panthers along with Dineen and assistant coach Gord Murphy on November 8, 2013. Ramsay was hired by the Edmonton Oilers as assistant coach on June 10, 2014 replacing Kelly Buchberger.

Awards and achievements[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

  Regular season Playoffs
SeasonTeamLeagueGPGAPtsPIMGPGAPtsPIM
1967–68Peterborough PetesOHA40613192150004
1968–69Peterborough PetesOHA5411283920101239
1969–70Peterborough PetesOHA542741681861347
1970–71Peterborough PetesOHA5830761062552242
1971–72Cincinnati SwordsAHL1957124
1971–72Buffalo SabresNHL57610160
1972–73Buffalo SabresNHL761117281561120
1973–74Buffalo SabresNHL782026460
1974–75Buffalo SabresNHL80263864261757122
1975–76Buffalo SabresNHL802249713491232
1976–77Buffalo SabresNHL802041612060440
1977–78Buffalo SabresNHL802843711883149
1978–79Buffalo SabresNHL802631571031012
1979–80Buffalo SabresNHL8021396018100664
1980–81Buffalo SabresNHL802435591282464
1981–82Buffalo SabresNHL80163551841120
1982–83Buffalo SabresNHL641118297102354
1983–84Buffalo SabresNHL76917261730110
1984–85Buffalo SabresNHL791221331651120
NHL totals10702524206722018917314827

NHL coaching record[edit]

TeamYearRegular seasonPost season
GWLTOTLPtsFinishResult
BUF1986–87214152-(64)5th in Adams(Interim)
PHI1999–002516810(105)1st in AtlanticLost in Conf. Finals
PHI2000–0128121240(100)2nd in Atlantic(Fired)
ATL2010–11823436-12804th in SoutheastMissed playoffs
Total1566671712-

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ NHL Website
  2. ^ "Buffalo Sabres Hall of Fame". sabresalumni.com. 
  3. ^ Weekes, Don (2003). The Best and Worst of Hockey's Firsts: The Unofficial Guide. Canada: Greystone Books. p. 240. ISBN 9781550548600. 
  4. ^ Bruins Website
  5. ^ [1]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Doug Jarvis
Winner of the Frank J. Selke Trophy
1985
Succeeded by
Troy Murray
Preceded by
Scotty Bowman
Head coach of the Buffalo Sabres
1986–87
Succeeded by
Ted Sator
Preceded by
Roger Neilson
Head coach of the Philadelphia Flyers
2000–01
Succeeded by
Bill Barber
Preceded by
John Anderson
Head coach of the Atlanta Thrashers
2010–11
Succeeded by
Claude Noel
(Winnipeg Jets)