Cox's Bazar

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Cox's Bazar
Location of Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh
Coordinates: 21°35′0″N 92°01′0″E / 21.583333°N 92.016667°E / 21.583333; 92.016667
CountryBangladesh Bangladesh
Administrative DistrictCox's Bazar District
Area
 • City6.85 km2 (2.64 sq mi)
Elevation3 m (10 ft)
Population (2007 est.)Total population represents population in city and metro represents entire district.[1]
 • City51,918
 • Density7,579.27/km2 (19,630.2/sq mi)
 • Metro120,480
Time zoneBST (UTC+6)
 
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Cox's Bazar
Location of Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh
Coordinates: 21°35′0″N 92°01′0″E / 21.583333°N 92.016667°E / 21.583333; 92.016667
CountryBangladesh Bangladesh
Administrative DistrictCox's Bazar District
Area
 • City6.85 km2 (2.64 sq mi)
Elevation3 m (10 ft)
Population (2007 est.)Total population represents population in city and metro represents entire district.[1]
 • City51,918
 • Density7,579.27/km2 (19,630.2/sq mi)
 • Metro120,480
Time zoneBST (UTC+6)
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Cox's Bazar sea beach · Kuakata
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St. Martin's Island · Nijhum Dwip

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Bangladesh Portal

Cox's Bazar (Bengali: কক্সবাজার) is a town, a fishing port and district headquarters in Bangladesh. It is known for its wide sandy beach which is considered by some people as the world's longest natural sandy sea beach,[2][3][4] although the Guinness Book of World Records lists Praia do Cassino in Brazil as the longest sandy beach with 254 km. The beach in Cox' Bazar is an unbroken 125 km sandy sea beach with a gentle slope. It is located 150 km south of the industrial port Chittagong. Cox’s Bazar is also known by the name "Panowa," the literal translation of which means "yellow flower." Its other old name was "Palongkee." The modern Cox's Bazar derives its name from Captain Hiram Cox (died 1799), an officer serving in British India. An officer of the British East India Company, Captain Cox was appointed Superintendent of Palongkee outpost after Warren Hastings became Governor of Bengal. Captain Cox was specially mobilised to deal with a century-long conflict between Arakan refugees and local Rakhains. He embarked upon the mammoth task of rehabilitating refugees in the area and made significant progress. A premature death took Captain Cox in 1799 before he could finish his work. To commemorate his role in rehabilitation work a market was established and named after him Cox's Bazar ("Cox's Market").

Today, Cox's Bazar is one of the most-visited tourist destinations in Bangladesh, however it has yet to become a major international tourist destination, with no international hotel chains operating there, due to lack of publicity and transportation.

Contents

The Town

Cox's Bazar (Town) Cox's Bazar municipality was constituted in 1869, eventually becoming a B-grade municipality in 1989. The municipality covers an area of 6.85 km2.[5] Located along the Bay of Bengal in South Eastern Bangladesh, Cox's Bazar Town is a very big port and health resort. But it is mostly famous for its long natural sandy beach. The municipality covers an area of 6.85 km² with 27 mahallas and 9 wards and has a population of 51,918.[1] Cox's Bazar is connected by road and air with Chittagong.[6]

History

The greater Chittagong area including Cox's Bazar was under the rule of Arakan Kings from the early 9th century until its conquest by the Mughals in 1666 AD.[7] When the Mughal Prince Shah Shuja was passing through the hilly terrain of the present day Cox’s Bazar on his way to Arakan, he was attracted to the scenic and captivating beauty of the place. He commanded his forces to camp there. His retinue of one thousand palanquins stopped there for some time. A place named Dulahazara, meaning "one thousand palanquins," still exists in the area. After the Mughals, the place came under the control of the Tipras and the Arakanese, followed by the Portuguese and then the British.

The name Cox's Bazar/Bazaar originated from the name of a British East India Company officer, Captain Hiram Cox who was appointed as the Superintendent of Palonki (today's Cox's Bazar) outpost after Warren Hastings became the Governor of Bengal following the British East India Company Act in 1773. Captain Cox was especially mobilised to deal with a century long conflict between Arakan refugees & local Rakhine people at Palonki. The Captain had rehabilitated many refugees in the area, but had died (in 1799) before he could finish his work. To commemorate that, a market was established and named after him, called Cox's Bazar (market of Cox). Cox's Bazar then was first established in 1854 and became a municipality in 1869.[7]

After the Sepoy Mutiny (Indian Rebellion of 1857) in 1857, the British East India Company was highly criticised and questioned on humanitarian grounds, specially for its Opium trade monopoly over the Indian Sub-Continent. However, after its dissolution on 1 January 1874, all of the company's assets including its Armed Forces were acquired by the British Crown. After this historic take over, Cox's Bazar was declared a district of the Bengal Province under the British Crown.

Cox's Bazar Map from Series U542, U.S. Army Map Service, 1955

After the end of British rule in 1947, Cox's Bazar remained as a part of East Pakistan. Captain Advocate Fazlul Karim, the first Chairman (after independence from the British) of Cox's Bazar Municipality established the Tamarisk Forest along the beach to draw tourist attention in this town and also to protect the beach from tidal waves. He also donated many of his father-in-law’s and his own lands for establishing a Public Library and a Town Hall for the town. He was inspired to build Cox's Bazar as a tourist spot after seeing beaches of Bombay and Karachi, and one of the pioneers in developing Cox's Bazar as such. He founded a Maternity Hospital, the Stadium and the drainage system by procuring grants from the Ford Foundation and Rockefeller Foundation through correspondence. Mr. T. H. Matthews, the principal of the Dacca Engineering College (1949~1954) was his friend who had helped him in doing this. Engineer Chandi Charan Das was the government civil engineer who had worked on all these projects. In 1959 the municipality was turned into a town committee.[7] In 1961 the erstwhile Geological Survey of Pakistan initiated investigation of radioactive minerals like monazite around the Cox's Bazar sea-beach area.[8]

Cox's Bazar Bus Terminal

In 1971, Cox's Bazar wharf was used as a naval port by the Pakistan Navy's gunboats. This and the nearby airstrip of the Pakistan Air Force were the scene of intense shelling by the Indian Navy during Bangladesh Liberation War. During the war, Pakistani soldiers killed many people in the town including eminent lawyer Jnanendralal Chowdhury. The killing of two freedom fighters named Farhad and Subhash at Badar Mokam area is also recorded in history.[9]

After the independence of Bangladesh Cox's Bazar started to get the administrative attention. In 1972 the town committee of Cox's Bazar was again turned into a municipality. In 1975, The Government of Bangladesh established a pilot plant at Kalatali.[8] Later, in 1984 Cox's Bazar subdivision was promoted to a district and five years later (in 1989) the Cox's Bazar municipality was elevated to B-grade.[7] In 1994 (jobs) the Marine Fisheries and Technology Station (MFTS) was established at Cox's Bazar. MFTS is a research station of Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute (BFRI) headquartered in Mymensingh. The station covers a land area of four hectares and contains five laboratories.[10] In April 2007 Bangladesh got connected to the submarine cable network as a member of the SEA-ME-WE-4 Consortium, as Cox's Bazar was selected as the landing station of the submarine cable.[11]

Geography and climate

Panorama of Cox's Bazar in the early morning: clouds on a blue sky, still water and forest in the distance.

Cox's Bazar town with an area of 6.85 km², is located at 21°35′0″N 92°01′0″E / 21.583333°N 92.016667°E / 21.583333; 92.016667 and bounded by Bakkhali River on the north and East, Bay of Bengal in the West, and Jhilwanj Union in the south.

The climate of Bangladesh is mostly determined by its location in the tropical monsoon region: high temperature, heavy rainfall, generally excessive humidity, and distinct seasonal variations.[12] The climate of Cox's bazar is mostly similar to the rest of the country. It is further characterised by the location in the coastal area. The annual average temperature in Cox's Bazar remains at about a maximum of 34.8 °C and a minimum of 16.1 °C. The average amount of rainfall remains at 4,285 mm.

Climate data for Cox's Bazar
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °C (°F)28
(82)
29
(85)
32
(89)
33
(92)
34
(93)
32
(89)
31
(88)
31
(88)
32
(89)
32
(89)
31
(87)
28
(82)
31.0
(87.8)
Average low °C (°F)16
(61)
18
(65)
22
(72)
26
(79)
28
(82)
28
(83)
29
(85)
27
(81)
27
(81)
26
(79)
22
(71)
18
(64)
24.0
(75.3)
Precipitation mm (inches)3
(0.1)
13
(0.5)
38
(1.5)
107
(4.2)
323
(12.7)
790
(31.1)
902
(35.5)
706
(27.8)
389
(15.3)
183
(7.2)
84
(3.3)
25
(1.0)
3,559
(140.1)
Source: Weatherbase[13]

Important Educational Institutions

Cox's Bazar Govt. High School one of the Institute for Education

Primary Teacher's Trainning Institute(P.T.I)

Medical Colleges: Cox's Bazar Medical College

Colleges:Cox's Bazar Govt. College, Cox's Bazar Woman College, Cox's Bazar City College, Ramu Degree College

High Schools:Cox's Bazar Govt. High School, Cox's Bazar Govt. Girls High School, Korak Bidda-pith, Chokoria, Chokoria Govt. High School

Economy and development

Submarine Cable Landing Station

As one of the most beautiful and famous tourist spots in Bangladesh, the major source of economy in Cox's Bazar is tourism. Millions of foreigners and Bangladeshi natives visit this coastal city every year. As a result, a large number of hotels, guest houses and motels have been built in the city and coastal region. Many people are involved in hospitality and customer service orientated businesses. Number of high-end hotels in the city was about 2 or 3 about 5 years ago, but today there are dozens and counting, however no renowned international hotel chains operate in the city, but many hotel chains are planning to build hotels here, such as the Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group plans 2 Radissons here in 2015, and another in the port city Chittagong.[14][15][16] Also, a Best Western hotel which opens in 2014, also Mövenpick Hotels & Resorts will open a Mövenpick Hotel in 2013.[17][18]

A number of people are also involved in fishing and collecting seafood and sea products for their livelihood. Various kinds of Oyster, Snail, Pearl and their ornaments are very popular with tourists in seaside and city stores. A number of people are also involved in the transportation business for tourists. Cox's Bazar is also one of the few major spots for aquaculture in Bangladesh.[19] Along with Khulna, it is considered a major source of revenue from foreign exchanges. Beside a mix of small-scale agriculture, marine and inland fishing and salt production are other industrial sources from this region that play important roles in the national economy.

Tourist attractions near the town

Shemon Local hotels arrange beachside accessories for the tourists at Cox's Bazar

The beach is the main attraction of the town. Larger hotels provide exclusive beachside area with accessories for the hotel guests. Visitors in other hotels visit the Laboni beach which is the area of the beach closest to the town. Other than the beach there are several places of interest near the town which can easily be visited from town center.

Safari Park is a declared protected area where the animals are kept in fairly large area with natural environment and visitors can easily see the animal when ever they visit by bus, jeep or on foot. This park was established on the basis of South Asian model. This safari park is an extension of an animal sanctuary located along the Chittagong-Cox's Bazar road about 50 km from Cox's Bazar town. The sanctuary itself protects a large number of wild elephants which are native to the area. In the safari park there are domesticated elephants which are available for a ride. Other animal attractions include lions, Bengal tigers, Crocodiles, Bears, Chitals and lots of different types of birds and monkeys.which is wonder full project to attract the tourist.

Other tourist attractions near Cox's Bazar

Dead corals at St. Martin's Island.
Natural Stream from Hills

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Municipal data; Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics
  2. ^ "The Longest Beach". http://thelongestlistofthelongeststuffatthelongestdomainnameatlonglast.com/long34.html. Retrieved 2008-01-10.
  3. ^ "Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh - the World's Longest Beach 120km". http://www.thingsasian.com/stories-photos/2334. Retrieved 2008-01-10.
  4. ^ "World's longest beach hidden in Bangladesh". The Sydney Morning Herald. 31 January 2007. http://www.smh.com.au/news/travel/the-worlds-longest-beach/2007/01/31/1169919381993.html. Retrieved 2008-01-10.
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ Cox’s Bāzār. (2008). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 2008-01-14, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online.
  7. ^ a b c d Siddiqi, Mahibbullah (2003). "Cox's Bazar District". In Islam, Sirajul. Banglapedia: national encyclopedia of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Societyof Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. http://banglapedia.search.com.bd/HT/C_0364.htm.
  8. ^ a b Chowdhury, Sifatul Quader (2003). "Beach Sand Heavy Mineral". In Islam, Sirajul. Banglapedia: national encyclopedia of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Societyof Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. http://search.com.bd/banglapedia/HT/B_0370.htm.
  9. ^ Alam, Badiul (2003). "Cox's Bazar Sadar Upazila". In Islam, Sirajul. Banglapedia: national encyclopedia of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Societyof Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. http://banglapedia.search.com.bd/HT/C_0365.htm.
  10. ^ Kabir, SM Humayun (2003). "Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute". In Islam, Sirajul. Banglapedia: national encyclopedia of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Societyof Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. http://banglapedia.search.com.bd/HT/B_0176.htm.
  11. ^ "Much needed Submarine Cable - Bangladesh". Bangladesh Development Gateway. 2006-03-02. http://www.bangladeshgateway.org/submarineCable.php. Retrieved 2008-01-14.
  12. ^ Ahmed, Rafique (2003). "Climate". In Islam, Sirajul. Banglapedia: national encyclopedia of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Society of Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. http://search.com.bd/banglapedia/HT/C_0288.htm.
  13. ^ "Weatherbase: Weather For Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh". Weatherbase. 2011. http://www.weatherbase.com/weather/weather.php3?s=5914&refer=&units=us. Retrieved on November 23, 2011.
  14. ^ Carlson Hotels: Locations
  15. ^ Radisson to set foot in Cox's Bazar
  16. ^ Wassener, Bettina (23 April 2012). The New York Times. http://rendezvous.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/04/23/hitting-the-beach-in-bangladesh/.
  17. ^ Cox's Bazar to get another luxury hotel
  18. ^ Info
  19. ^ "The Development of Export-Oriented Shrimp Aquaculture in Bangladesh: a preliminary assessment of moves to more intensive production in southeastern Bangladesh". http://www.sociology.ed.ac.uk/sas/conf16/panel51.htm. Retrieved 2008-02-01.[dead link]
  20. ^ Hossain, Mofazzal (2003). "Cox's Bazar". In Islam, Sirajul. Banglapedia: national encyclopedia of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Societyof Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. http://search.com.bd/banglapedia/HT/C_0363.htm.
  21. ^ a b Hossain, Mofazzal. 2003. Cox's Bazar. In the Banglapedia. The Asiatic Society of Bangladesh, Dhaka. P. 145
  22. ^ Islam, M Aminul (2003). "Ecologically Critical Area". In Islam, Sirajul. Banglapedia: national encyclopedia of Bangladesh. Dhaka: Asiatic Society of Bangladesh. ISBN 984-32-0576-6. http://banglapedia.search.com.bd/HT/E_0017.htm.

External links

Coordinates: 21°35′N 92°01′E / 21.583°N 92.017°E / 21.583; 92.017