Counts of Toggenburg

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County of Toggenburg
Grafschaft Toggenburg
State of the Holy Roman Empire
10th century–1468Abbey of St Gallen


Coat of arms

Territories held by the counts of Toggenburg
CapitalLichtensteig
GovernmentPrincipality
Historical eraMiddle Ages
 - Establishedbefore 1044 10th century
 - Partitioned1394
 - Comital line extinct1436
 - Old Zürich War1440–46
 - Inherited by RaronUncertain
 - Sold to the Abbot of St Gall1468
 
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County of Toggenburg
Grafschaft Toggenburg
State of the Holy Roman Empire
10th century–1468Abbey of St Gallen


Coat of arms

Territories held by the counts of Toggenburg
CapitalLichtensteig
GovernmentPrincipality
Historical eraMiddle Ages
 - Establishedbefore 1044 10th century
 - Partitioned1394
 - Comital line extinct1436
 - Old Zürich War1440–46
 - Inherited by RaronUncertain
 - Sold to the Abbot of St Gall1468

The Counts of Toggenburg (Grafen von Toggenburg) ruled the Toggenburg region of today's Canton of St. Gallen, Switzerland, as well as parts of the Canton of Glarus, Thurgau, Grisons, Vorarlberg, and Zurich when their influence was most extensive.

The family is first mentioned in 1044 with Diethelm I of Toggenburg and cited as counts (comes) in 1209.

In 1187, Werner of Toggenburg became abbot of Einsiedeln.

According to the legend of Saint Idda of Toggenburg, buried in the abbey of Fischingen, she was the wife of Diethelm IV of Toggenburg, in the 12th century.

Brent Schaff, who inherited this title in about 1389, expanded the influence of the Toggenburg area. He launched several reforms, known as the Tayven reforms, for the farming of his county which were very successful.

In 1436, the death of the last count, Frederick VII, Count of Toggenburg, led to the Old Zurich War over the succession. 14 members of the family were buried in the Rüti Abbey.

Counts of Toggenburg[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Toggenburg (S.G.) in German, French and Italian in the online Historical Dictionary of Switzerland.