Coprophilia

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This article is about the paraphilia. For dung-feeding fungi, see Coprophilous fungi. For the form of Tourette syndrome, see coprolalia.

Coprophilia (from Greek κόπρος, kópros—excrement and φιλία, philía—liking, fondness), also called scatophilia or scat (Greek: σκατά, skatá-shit),[1] is the paraphilia involving sexual arousal and pleasure from feces.[2][3] In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association, it is classified under 302.89 – Paraphilia NOS (Not Otherwise Specified) and has no diagnostic criteria other than a general statement about paraphilias that says "the diagnosis is made if the behavior, sexual urges, or fantasies cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning". Furthermore, the DSM-IV-TR notes, "Fantasies, behaviors, or objects are paraphilic only when they lead to clinically significant distress or impairment (e.g. are obligatory, result in sexual dysfunction, require participation of nonconsenting individuals, lead to legal complications, interfere with social relationships)".

Although there may be no connection between coprophilia and sadomasochism (SM), the limited data on the former comes from studies of the latter. A study of 164 males in Finland from two SM clubs[4] found that 18.2% had engaged in coprophilia; 3% as a sadist, 6.1% as a masochist, and 9.1% as both. 18% of heterosexuals and 17% of homosexuals in the study pool had tried coprophilia, showing no statistically significant difference between heterosexuals and homosexuals. In a separate article analyzing 12 men who engaged in bestiality, an additional analysis of an 11-man subgroup revealed that 6 had engaged in coprophilic behavior, compared with only 1 in the matched control group consisting of 12 SM-oriented males who did not engage in bestiality.[5]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Holmes, Ronald M. Sex Crimes: Patterns and Behavior. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. p. 244. ISBN 0-7619-2417-5. OCLC 47893709. 
  2. ^ Corsini, Raymond J. (2002). The Dictionary of Psychology. Philadelphia: Brunner-Routledge. p. 224. ISBN 1-58391-328-9. OCLC 48932974. 
  3. ^ Flora, Rudy (2001). How to Work with Sex Offenders: A Handbook for Criminal Justice, Human Service, and Mental Health Professionals. New York: Haworth Clinical Practice Press. p. 91. ISBN 0-7890-1499-8. OCLC 45668958. 
  4. ^ N. Kenneth Sandnabba, Pekka Santtila, Niklas Nordling (August 1999). "Sexual Behavior and Social Adaptation Among Sadomasochistically-Oriented Males". Journal of Sex Research. 
  5. ^ Sandnabba N.K.; Santtila P.; Nordling N.; Beetz A.M.; Alison L. (November 2002). "Characteristics of a Sample of Sadomasochistically-oriented Males with Recent Experience of Sexual Contact with Animals". Deviant Behavior 23 (6). 

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