Coon Rapids, Minnesota

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Coon Rapids, Minnesota
City
CR Logo.jpg
Location of the city of Coon Rapidswithin Anoka County, Minnesota
Location of the city of Coon Rapids
within Anoka County, Minnesota
Coordinates: 45°07′12″N 93°17′15″W / 45.12000°N 93.28750°W / 45.12000; -93.28750Coordinates: 45°07′12″N 93°17′15″W / 45.12000°N 93.28750°W / 45.12000; -93.28750
CountryUnited States
StateMinnesota
CountyAnoka
Government
 • MayorTim Howe
Area[1]
 • City23.34 sq mi (60.45 km2)
 • Land22.61 sq mi (58.56 km2)
 • Water0.73 sq mi (1.89 km2)
Elevation860 ft (259 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • City61,476
 • Estimate (2013)[3]62,103
 • Density2,719.0/sq mi (1,049.8/km2)
 • Metro3,459,146 (US: 16th)
Time zoneCST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes55433, 55448
Area code(s)763
FIPS code27-13114
GNIS feature ID0641479[4]
WebsiteCity of Coon Rapids
 
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Coon Rapids, Minnesota
City
CR Logo.jpg
Location of the city of Coon Rapidswithin Anoka County, Minnesota
Location of the city of Coon Rapids
within Anoka County, Minnesota
Coordinates: 45°07′12″N 93°17′15″W / 45.12000°N 93.28750°W / 45.12000; -93.28750Coordinates: 45°07′12″N 93°17′15″W / 45.12000°N 93.28750°W / 45.12000; -93.28750
CountryUnited States
StateMinnesota
CountyAnoka
Government
 • MayorTim Howe
Area[1]
 • City23.34 sq mi (60.45 km2)
 • Land22.61 sq mi (58.56 km2)
 • Water0.73 sq mi (1.89 km2)
Elevation860 ft (259 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • City61,476
 • Estimate (2013)[3]62,103
 • Density2,719.0/sq mi (1,049.8/km2)
 • Metro3,459,146 (US: 16th)
Time zoneCST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes55433, 55448
Area code(s)763
FIPS code27-13114
GNIS feature ID0641479[4]
WebsiteCity of Coon Rapids

Coon Rapids is a northern suburb of Minneapolis, and is the largest city in Anoka County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 61,476 at the 2010 census,[5] making it the thirteen largest city in Minnesota and the seventh largest Twin Cities suburb.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 23.34 square miles (60.45 km2), of which, 22.61 square miles (58.56 km2) is land and 0.73 square miles (1.89 km2) is water.[1] Recreational lakes in the city include Cenaiko Lake and Crooked Lake, two-thirds of which is in Coon Rapids. The other third is in the city of Andover, immediately to the north.

Transportation[edit]

Coon Rapids Dam
Coon Rapids Dam

While commercial traffic on the Mississippi River once passed through Coon Rapids - steamboats could reach as far north as St. Cloud under certain conditions - the construction of the Coon Rapids Dam marked the city as the northern terminus of the navigable portion of the river.

U.S. Highway 10 and Minnesota State Highways 47 and 610 are three of the main routes in the city.

Coon Rapids Riverdale Station is served by the Northstar Commuter Rail line connecting the northwest suburbs and downtown Minneapolis; the line opened in November 2009.[6]

Government[edit]

The city of Coon Rapids has a council–manager form of government, and its current mayor is Tim Howe. While mayoral and council member elections in Coon Rapids are nonpartisan, Howe has been endorsed by the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.

As of the 2012 election, Coon Rapids is represented in the State House by districts 35B (Peggy Scott, Republican), 36A (Mark Uglem, Republican), 36B (Melissa Hortman, Democrat) and 37A (Jerry Newton, Democrat); and in the State Senate by districts 35 (Branden Peterson, Republican), 36 (John Hoffman, Democrat) and 37 (Alice Johnson, Democrat).

Coon Rapids is located partially in Minnesota's 3rd congressional district, represented by Republican Erik Paulsen, and partially in Minnesota's 6th congressional district, represented by Republican Michele Bachmann.

Mayors[edit]

Since its incorporation as a city in 1952, Coon Rapids, Minnesota has had 14 mayors:

  • Joe Nelson (1952–1953)
  • Glenn Haven (1954–1955)
  • Leslie B. Mason (1956–1958)
  • Irving Nelson (1958–1959)
  • Joe Craig (1960–1967)
  • Robert Voss (1968–1971)
  • Donald Erlandson (1972–1975)
  • George White (1976–1979)
  • David S. McCauley (1980–1981)
  • Robert B. Lewis (1982–1989)
  • Richard S. Reiter (1990–1991)
  • William F. Thompson (1992–1998)
  • Ilona McCauley (1999–2002)
  • Tim Howe (2003–present)

Mayor Howe was elected in 2002, and re-elected in 2006 and 2010. The next mayoral election will take place in 2014.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
196014,931
197030,505104.3%
198035,82617.4%
199052,97847.9%
200061,62716.3%
201061,476−0.2%
Est. 201362,1031.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
2013 Estimate[3]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 61,476 people, 23,532 households, and 16,323 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,719.0 inhabitants per square mile (1,049.8/km2). There were 24,462 housing units at an average density of 1,081.9 per square mile (417.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 86.0% White, 5.5% African American, 0.7% Native American, 3.5% Asian, 1.2% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.2% of the population.

There were 23,532 households of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.6% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.08.

The median age in the city was 36.9 years. 24.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.5% were from 25 to 44; 27.8% were from 45 to 64; and 11.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 61,627 people, 22,578 households, and 16,572 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,718.1 people per square mile (1,049.5/km²). There were 22,828 housing units at an average density of 1,007.2 per square mile (388.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.22% White, 2.18% African American, 0.67% Native American, 1.60% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.59% from other races, and 1.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.51% of the population.

There were 22,578 households out of which 39.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.3% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.6% were non-families. 20.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 7.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 94.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $55,550, and the median income for a family was $62,260. Males had a median income of $41,195 versus $30,277 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,915. About 3.6% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.6% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.

Notable People[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-13. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  3. ^ a b "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-07-23. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census. Retrieved 23 April 2011. 
  6. ^ Levy, Paul (2007-12-11). "Northstar set to roll, but how far?". Star Tribune. Retrieved 2010-09-07. 
  7. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved July 23, 2014. 

External links[edit]