Comrade X

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Comrade X
ComradeX.jpg
1940 US Theatrical Poster
Directed byKing Vidor
Produced byGottfried Reinhardt
King Vidor
Written byWalter Reisch (story)
Ben Hecht
Charles Lederer
Herman J. Mankiewicz (uncredited)
StarringClark Gable
Hedy Lamarr
Oskar Homolka
Felix Bressart
Music byBronislau Kaper
CinematographyJoseph Ruttenberg
Editing byHarold F. Kress
StudioMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Distributed byMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release dates
  • December 13, 1940 (1940-12-13) (U.S.)
Running time90 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$920,000[1]
Box office$2,079,000[1]
 
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Comrade X
ComradeX.jpg
1940 US Theatrical Poster
Directed byKing Vidor
Produced byGottfried Reinhardt
King Vidor
Written byWalter Reisch (story)
Ben Hecht
Charles Lederer
Herman J. Mankiewicz (uncredited)
StarringClark Gable
Hedy Lamarr
Oskar Homolka
Felix Bressart
Music byBronislau Kaper
CinematographyJoseph Ruttenberg
Editing byHarold F. Kress
StudioMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Distributed byMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release dates
  • December 13, 1940 (1940-12-13) (U.S.)
Running time90 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$920,000[1]
Box office$2,079,000[1]

Comrade X is a 1940 American comedy spy film directed by King Vidor and starring Clark Gable, Hedy Lamarr and Oskar Homolka.

Plot[edit]

In the Soviet Union, American reporter McKinley "Mac" Thompson (Clark Gable) secretly writes unflattering stories, attributed to "Comrade X," for his newspaper. His identity is discovered by his valet, Vanya (Felix Bressart), who blackmails Mac into promising to get his daughter, a streetcar conductor named Theodore (Hedy Lamarr), out of the country. Theodore agrees to a sham marriage so she can spread the message of the benefits of Communism to the rest of the world. However, Commissar Vasiliev (Oscar Homolka) is determined to unmask and arrest Comrade X.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Box Office[edit]

According to MGM records the film earned $1,520,000 in the US and Canada and $559,000 elsewhere resulting in a profit of $484,000.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study .

External links[edit]