Compel

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To compel one to present information to a jury is done by order of a judge. If a judge believes the individual has information relevant to the cause, he can "force" that person to present that information or be subject to arrest for contempt of court.

Compellability[edit]

In the United States, the 5th Amendment to the United States Constitution guarantees that defendants cannot be compelled in criminal proceedings against themselves.

In Australia, the Criminal Procedure Act establishes a similar protection for defendants, and also for their spouses and immediate family.

In Canada, anti-terrorism clauses that were brought in in 2001 but were sunset in 2007 allowed a judge to compel a witness to testify in secret about past associations or perhaps pending acts under penalty of going to jail if the witness didn't comply.[1]

Compel also means to lure to do something.