Clio

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In Greek mythology, Clio (pron.: /ˈkl./; Greek: Κλειώ) or Kleio, is the muse of history. Like all the muses, she is a daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne. She had one son, Hyacinth, with one of several kings, in various myths - with Pierus, King of Macedon, or with king Oebalus of Sparta, or with king Amyclas,[1] progenitor of the people of Amyclae, dwellers about Sparta. Some sources say she was also the mother of Hymenaios.

She is often represented with a parchment scroll or a set of tablets and is also known as the Proclaimer. The name is from the root κλέω/κλείω,("recount" or "make famous").[2]

'Clio' represents history in some coined words: cliometrics, cliodynamics.

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References

  1. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus 3. 10.3; Pausanias 3. 1.3, 19.4
  2. ^ D. S. Levene, Damien P. Nelis (2002). Clio and the Poets: Augustan Poetry and the Traditions of Ancient Historiography. Brill Academic Publishers. ISBN 90-04-11782-2.