Classic Car Rescue

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Classic Car Rescue
Classic Car Rescue.jpg
Title card featuring the 1969 Jaguar E-Type Series 2
Presented by
  • Bernie Fineman
  • Mario Pacione
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original language(s)English
No. of series1
No. of episodes6
Production
Running time45 minutes
Production company(s)Blink Films
Broadcast
Original channel
Original run24 September 2012 (2012-09-24) – 29 October 2012 (2012-10-29)
External links
Website
 
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Classic Car Rescue
Classic Car Rescue.jpg
Title card featuring the 1969 Jaguar E-Type Series 2
Presented by
  • Bernie Fineman
  • Mario Pacione
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original language(s)English
No. of series1
No. of episodes6
Production
Running time45 minutes
Production company(s)Blink Films
Broadcast
Original channel
Original run24 September 2012 (2012-09-24) – 29 October 2012 (2012-10-29)
External links
Website

Classic Car Rescue is a British reality television series produced by Blink Films and aired on Channel 5 for six weeks in 2012, as well as on Discovery Networks affiliates in international markets.[1] Each one-hour episode documents the work of Cockney mechanic Bernie Fineman and his Canadian business partner Mario Pacione, as they purchase "shameful rust bucket" classic cars from scrapheaps, wastelands and backyards and restore them to their former glories.[2] Having bought the "bargain wrecks," the pair must then source the parts needed to return the cars to the shiny, desirable motors they once were. At the end of each episode, the cars are appraised by automotive valuer Dylan Miles before being given away in a viewer competition.[3]

Episode list[edit]

EpisodeDateCarDescriptionRatings
124 September 20121969 Jaguar E-Type Series 2In the first episode, Bernie and Mario have to restore an E-Type in four weeks. After the first potential purchase, a U.S.-spec 2+2, proves too expensive at £14,000, Bernie buys a different U.S.-spec Series 2 2+2 with an automatic transmission for £12,000. This annoys Mario, as they had agreed not to spend over £10,000. Along with the mechanical and aesthetic restorations, the car is resprayed from its original white to Signal Red, despite Mario accidentally damaging the right rear wing when he backs the car up and hits an engine. A brand-new aftermarket sunroof is installed to fill the void left by the previous non-original modification. The original U.S.-spec bumpers are retained. Dylan Miles, a valuer from RM Auctions appraises the finished car at £30,000, giving them a profit of £9,600.[4]1.11m
21 October 20121977 Porsche 911The second episode sees Bernie and Mario agree to restore a Porsche 911. The first one they find turns out to be completely stripped, so it is rejected. They settle on their second find, an incomplete silver 1977 model that they buy for £6,900. While the car is being stripped for painting, the mechanics suspect that it is a "cut and shut" due to the amounts of filler used above the firewall and the dodgy repair work on the roof, but this is debunked upon further inspection by Mario. After the most of the mechanical work is done, the car is repainted Signal Orange, similar to an original colour that Porsche offered in the 1970s, and is fitted with a whale tail and a bespoke interior. Despite a dirty engine bay and some paint chips on the driver's side door frame, the finished car is valued at £22,000, giving them a profit of £8,100.[5]0.82m
38 October 20121976 MGB GTIn this episode, Bernie and Mario go out to hunt down an MGB. They visit a collector who offers a rubber bumper B GT, but they reject the offer, as the car has been disassembled and it is unknown if all of the parts are intact. Bernie then visits a farmer who owns a barn filled with classic cars, including an Inca Yellow 1976 B GT. After much argument between Bernie and the farmer over the car's rotting state and the £800 asking price, Mario negotiates with the farmer over the phone and agrees to buy it for £500. Despite numerous mishaps including the rear suspension falling off the car lift and Bernie sacking the mechanics before rehiring them, the two-week restoration sees the car repainted in medium British racing green and have a chrome bumper conversion. The chrome grille chosen is of the 'honeycomb' style. The original fabric sunroof is also filled in. The finished car is valued at £5,000, giving them a profit of £1,600.[6]1.13m
415 October 20121969 Ford Mustang ConvertibleIn this episode, Bernie travels to Mario's hometown of Toronto, Canada, to find a muscle car to restore. After considering a Chevrolet Nova, they decide to restore a Mustang. Their first find does not suit their budget, but Mario finds a 1969 convertible which already has a coat of primer applied, despite being in pieces and its engine is beyond saving. After the owner shows him a detailed report of the car's manufacture history and a reprint of the original factory sticker, as well as proof that the car is the only one to have been fitted with an electric clock, Mario buys it for CDN$5,000, which annoys Bernie as a convertible would be harder to restore than a hardtop. It is also discovered that most of the undercarriage is completely rusted out. During the restoration period, Mario accidentally drops the windscreen while handling it by himself, forcing the duo to hunt for a replacement. He is also forced to spend an extra CDN$1,700 to buy the 302 cid engine from the first find and have it rebuilt to replace the car's dead motor. Tensions further arise when the mechanics quit after Bernie blows up on them over an accidental engine fire. Nevertheless, the three-week restoration gets underway and the completed car is finished in Grabber Blue and has Boss 302 decals applied, as well as a matching rear spoiler installed. Despite having a misaligned bonnet and right-side door, the finished car is valued at CDN$29,000, giving them a profit of CDN$10,000 (roughly £6,500).[7]1.11m
522 October 20121954 Cadillac Coupe De VilleWhile still in Canada, Bernie and Mario search for a classic Cadillac and visit the home of millionaire Steve Plunkett, whose Cadillac collection is worth at least £10 million. The tour inspires them to hunt down a 1950s model. After the duo pass on a rusted Cadillac limousine (which may fetch a lot of money, but will cost too much to restore), Mario spends CDN$6,500 for a 1954 Cadillac Coupe De Ville that has been rusting in a barn and accommodating a family of mice for many years. The duo restores the car within a one month window, during which, it is repainted from yellow to Argent Silver with a black roof (although Mario accidentally has it painted in an unattractive grey beforehand) and a green/grey interior. The finished car is valued at CDN$25,000, which gives them a profit of CDN$9,000 (roughly £6,000).[8]1.29m
629 October 20121975 Morris Mini 1000Returning to the UK, Bernie and Mario set out to restore a Mini. After purchasing a blue 1975 Morris Mini 1000 and an original Morris Mini Minor owner's manual for £720, Bernie decides to restore the car in under one week, despite the copious amounts of rust and the engine running on only three cylinders. Various incidents occur as a result of Bernie's "traditional" approach, including a fire during some work on the floor panel. Bernie makes a deal with a local Mini specialist for some brightwork and new suspension trumpets. The car is repainted blue with white roof and racing stripes, and is fitted with a new exhaust system and grille-mounted fog lights. The car is examined and declared to have a value of £5,000 - a profit of £1,680.1.36m

Reception[edit]

James Ruppert of Autocar wrote a scathing review on the TV series, criticizing Fineman as a "big fat bully making a drama out of a manufactured crisis."[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Classic Car Rescue". Discovery Communications. Retrieved 2013-03-08. 
  2. ^ "Classic Car Rescue - Series Overview". MSN. Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  3. ^ Lamden, Tim (2012-10-22). "Golders Green mechanic watched by millions on Channel 5 show Classic Car Rescue". Ham & High. Retrieved 2013-03-08. 
  4. ^ "Jaguar E-Type | Classic Car Rescue". Channel 5. 2012-09-12. Retrieved 2012-10-13. 
  5. ^ "Porsche 911 | Classic Car Rescue". Channel 5. 2012-09-24. Retrieved 2012-10-13. 
  6. ^ "MGB | Classic Car Rescue". Channel 5. 2012-10-01. Retrieved 2012-10-13. 
  7. ^ "Mustang | Classic Car Rescue". Channel 5. Retrieved 2012-10-13. 
  8. ^ "Cadillac | Classic Car Rescue". Channel 5. Retrieved 2012-10-25. 
  9. ^ Ruppert, James (2012-10-12). "Car TV Is Rubbish". Autocar. Retrieved 2013-03-08. 

External links[edit]