Clark County, Ohio

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Clark County, Ohio
Springfield-ohio-courthouse.jpg
Seal of Clark County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Clark County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
FoundedMarch 1, 1818[1]
Named forGeneral George Rogers Clark
SeatSpringfield
Largest citySpringfield
Area
 • Total402.53 sq mi (1,043 km2)
 • Land397.47 sq mi (1,036 km2)
 • Water5.05 sq mi (13 km2), 1.25%
Population
 • (2010)138,333
 • Density348.0/sq mi (134/km²)
Congressional district8th
Time zoneEastern: UTC-5/-4
Websitewww.clarkcountyohio.gov
 
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For British letters to voters in Clark County in the 2004 Presidential election, see The Guardian.
Clark County, Ohio
Springfield-ohio-courthouse.jpg
Seal of Clark County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Clark County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
FoundedMarch 1, 1818[1]
Named forGeneral George Rogers Clark
SeatSpringfield
Largest citySpringfield
Area
 • Total402.53 sq mi (1,043 km2)
 • Land397.47 sq mi (1,036 km2)
 • Water5.05 sq mi (13 km2), 1.25%
Population
 • (2010)138,333
 • Density348.0/sq mi (134/km²)
Congressional district8th
Time zoneEastern: UTC-5/-4
Websitewww.clarkcountyohio.gov

Clark County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 138,333, which is a decrease of 4.4% from 144,742 in 2000.[2] Its county seat is Springfield.[3] The county was created on March 1, 1818, and was named for General George Rogers Clark,[4] a hero of the American Revolution.

Clark County comprises the Springfield, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Dayton-Springfield-Sidney-OH Combined Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 402.53 square miles (1,042.5 km2), of which 397.47 square miles (1,029.4 km2) (or 98.74%) is land and 5.05 square miles (13.1 km2) (or 1.25%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18209,533
183013,11437.6%
184016,88228.7%
185022,17831.4%
186025,30014.1%
187032,07026.8%
188041,94830.8%
189052,27724.6%
190058,93912.7%
191066,43512.7%
192080,72821.5%
193090,93612.6%
194095,6475.2%
1950111,66116.7%
1960131,44017.7%
1970157,11519.5%
1980150,236−4.4%
1990147,548−1.8%
2000144,742−1.9%
2010138,333−4.4%
Est. 2012137,206−0.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
2012 Estimate[2]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 144,742 people, 56,648 households, and 39,370 families residing in the county. The population density was 362 people per square mile (140/km²). There were 61,056 housing units at an average density of 153 per square mile (59/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 88.12% White, 8.95% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.53% from other races, and 1.58% from two or more races. 1.17% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.8% were of German, 21.6% American, 10.4% Irish and 8.7% English ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 56,648 households out of which 31.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.60% were married couples living together, 12.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.50% were non-families. 26.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.10% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 14.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 92.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,340, and the median income for a family was $48,259. Males had a median income of $37,157 versus $24,688 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,501. About 7.90% of families and 10.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.90% of those under age 18 and 8.20% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

The Springfield metropolitan area was first defined in 1950. Then known as the Springfield Standard Metropolitan Area (Springfield SMA), it consisted of a single county – Clark – and had a population of 111,661.[8][9] Following a term change by the Bureau of the Budget (present-day Office of Management and Budget) in 1959, the Springfield SMA became the Springfield Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (Springfield SMSA).[10] By the census of 1960, the population had grown to 131,440, an 18 percent increase over the previous census.[9] Champaign County was added to the Springfield SMSA in 1973. The two-county area had a combined population of 187,606 in 1970.[9]

In 1983, the official name was shortened to the Springfield Metropolitan Statistical Area (Springfield MSA).[10] That same year, Dayton and Springfield were grouped together as the Dayton-Springfield Metropolitan Statistical Area. The new MSA consisted of four counties – Clark, Greene, Miami, and Montgomery.[11] This arrangement remained unchanged until 2003, when the MSA was split with Springfield's newly defined metropolitan area including only Clark County.[12]

Government[edit]

Communities[edit]

Map of Clark County, Ohio with Municipal and Township Labels

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Townships[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other communities[edit]

Education[edit]

Public school districts[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Clark County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Retrieved 2007-04-28. 
  2. ^ a b "Clark County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-02-16. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 82. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved November 2, 2013. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ "Standard Metropolitan Areas (SMAs) and Components" (TXT). Standard Metropolitan Areas defined by the Bureau of the Budget, October 13, 1950. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2000-12-14. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  9. ^ a b c "Ohio - Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 1995-03-27. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  10. ^ a b "About Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  11. ^ "Metropolitan Areas and Components, 1983" (TXT). Metropolitan Areas defined by Office of Management and Budget, June 27, 1983. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2001-03-01. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  12. ^ "Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Components, 2003" (TXT). Metropolitan statistical areas defined by Office of Management and Budget, June 6, 2003. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2003-07-10. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°55′N 83°47′W / 39.92°N 83.78°W / 39.92; -83.78