Chromosome 5 (human)

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Chromosome 5.svg

Chromosome 5 is one of the 23 pairs of chromosomes in humans. People normally have two copies of this chromosome. Chromosome 5 spans about 181 million base pairs (the building blocks of DNA) and represents almost 6% of the total DNA in cells. Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes, yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of non-coding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained.[1]

Identifying genes on each chromosome is an active area of genetic research. Because researchers use different approaches to predict the number of genes on each chromosome, the estimated number of genes varies. Chromosome 5 likely contains between 900 and 1,300 genes.

Because chromosome 5 is responsible for many forms of growth and development (cell divisions) changes may cause cancers. One example would be AML. [2]

Genes[edit]

The following are some of the genes located on chromosome 5:

Diseases & disorders[edit]

The following are some of the diseases related to genes located on chromosome 5:

Chromosomal conditions[edit]

The following conditions are caused by changes in the structure or number of copies of chromosome 5:

Researchers have defined narrow regions of the short arm of chromosome 5 that are associated with particular features of cri-du-chat syndrome. A specific region designated 5p15.3 is associated with a cat-like cry, and a nearby region called 5p15.2 is associated with mental retardation, small head (microcephaly), and distinctive facial features.

References[edit]