Christopher Mitchum

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Christopher Mitchum
Chris Mitchum.jpg
Chris Mitchum, 2012
Born(1943-10-16) October 16, 1943 (age 70)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
Other namesChris Mitchum
EducationUniversity of Pennsylvania; Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland - Jr. year abroad
OccupationActor, Political activist, Writer, Producer
Years active1966–present
Home townSanta Barbara, California, U.S.
Political partyRepublican Party
Spouse(s)Cindy Mitchum
ChildrenBentley Mitchum
Carrie Mitchum
Jennifer Mitchum
Kian Mitchum
 
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Christopher Mitchum
Chris Mitchum.jpg
Chris Mitchum, 2012
Born(1943-10-16) October 16, 1943 (age 70)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
Other namesChris Mitchum
EducationUniversity of Pennsylvania; Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland - Jr. year abroad
OccupationActor, Political activist, Writer, Producer
Years active1966–present
Home townSanta Barbara, California, U.S.
Political partyRepublican Party
Spouse(s)Cindy Mitchum
ChildrenBentley Mitchum
Carrie Mitchum
Jennifer Mitchum
Kian Mitchum

Christopher Allan Mitchum (born October 16, 1943), is an American actor and politician. He was born in Los Angeles, California, the second son of film star Robert Mitchum and his wife Dorothy. He is also the younger brother of actor James Mitchum. He ran for Congress in 2012, but lost, though he intends to run again.

Mitchum, a former actor, appeared in the John Wayne motion pictures Chisum (1970), Rio Lobo (1970) and Big Jake (1971), with Charlton Heston in Last Hard Men (1976), and Tombstone (1993), and starred in some 60 films in 14 different countries. He is the recipient of the Photoplay's Gold Medal Award for 1971, cited by Box Office magazine as one of the top five stars of the future, and has won both The Golden Horse Award[1] (Chinese Academy Award, 1981–1982), and The Golden Reel, Best Actor (1988, Indonesia). He has been a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Since 1978.

He was elected to two three year terms on the Board of Director for SAG from 1983–1989, and spent two of those years as the National 1st Vice President from 1987–1989. He also served on the Republican Central Committees for both Ventura and Santa Barbara counties from 1998–2000.

He is the father of Bentley Mitchum, Carrie Mitchum, Jennifer Mitchum and Kian Mitchum. He is also the grandfather of Cappy Van Dien, Grace Van Dien, Allexanne Mitchum and Carrington Wyatt.

Filmography[edit]

  • Chisum (1970)
  • Suppose They Gave a War and Nobody Came (1970)
  • Bigfoot (1970)
  • Rio Lobo (1970)
  • H-Bomb as Eddie (1971)
  • Big Jake (1971)
  • Cactus in the Snow (1971)
  • Summertime Killer as Ray Castor (1972)
  • A Time for Love (1973)
  • Clockwork Terror (1973) (aka "Murder in a Blue World") as David
  • Ricco The Mean Machine (1973) (aka "Cauldron of Death") as Ricco
  • Bloody Sun (1974) (aka "Blue Jeans & Dynamite")
  • Cosa Nostra Asia (1974)
  • Once (1974)
  • Master Samurai (1974) (aka "The Agency")
  • Chinese Commandos (1975) (Was Never Finished/Made)
  • The Last Hard Men (1976)
  • Flight to Holocaust (1977)
  • Stingray (1978) as Al
  • One Man Jury (1978)
  • Desperate Target (1980) (aka "Escape from Russia")
  • Tusk (1980)
  • A Rumor of War (1980)
  • The Day Time Ended (1980)
  • Ritoru Champion (1981) (aka "My Champion")
  • Commander Firefox (1983)
  • Magnum P.I. (1984) ("1 Episode")
  • The Executioner, Part II (1984)
  • Hijacked to Hell (1984) (aka "No Time to Die")
  • The Serpent Warriors (1985)
  • Rocky IV (1985- uncredited) as Russian Guard
  • Promises to Keep (1985)
  • Final Score (1986)
  • American Commandos (1986)
  • SFX Retaliator (1987)
  • Death Feud (1987) (aka "Savage Harbor")
  • Dark Mission: Flowers of Evil (1987)
  • Faceless (1987) (aka "Les Predateurs de la Nuit")
  • Angel of Death (1987) (aka "Commando Mengele")
  • Columbian Connection (aka "Dark Mission: Flowers of Evil)
  • Real Men Don't Eat Gummy Bears (1989) (aka "Gummibärchen Küsst Man Nicht")
  • We Are Seven (1989-1993) ("13 Episodes")
  • American Hunter (1990) (aka "Lethal Hunter")
  • Aftershock (1990)
  • Magic Kid (1993)
  • Jungle of Fear (1993)
  • Body Count (1995)
  • Biohazard: The Alien Force (1995)
  • Striking Point (1995)
  • Lethal Cowboy (1995)
  • Jimi (1996)
  • Countdown to Disaster (1996) (aka "Lethal Orbit")
  • Fugitive X: Innocent Target (1996)
  • Lethal Seduction (1997)
  • Love and War II: The Final Showdown (1998)
  • Night of Terror (1999)
  • Lycanthrope (1999)
  • Diamondbacks (1999)
  • Soul Searchers (2006)
  • Goy (2011)
  • Santa's Summer House (2012)

Political Involvement[edit]

Mitchum was the Republican nominee in the 1998 general election for the California State Assembly in the 35th District, which included portions of Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties. He lost the election to Democrat Hannah-Beth Jackson.

In 2012, he declared his intention to run for the U.S. House of Representatives in Congressional District 24.[2]

Mitchum says his career in Hollywood was adversely affected by the fact he was politically conservative and a friend and frequent co-actor of John Wayne, another conservative actor and icon. He was forced to pursue a career in Europe in later years because of this alleged bias.[3]

In 1971 Mitchum won Photoplay's Gold Medal Award and was picked by Box Office magazine as one of the top five stars of the future along with Ryan O'Neal. But everything suddenly came to a screeching halt after that major role in Wayne's Big Jake.
“I went 11 months without one interview," Mitchum recalls--a time when the film industry was buzzing with projects. Finally, the casting director on the comedy Steelyard Blues gave him the heads up. “You worked with John Wayne, I can’t even interview you,” he told Mitchum.

Philanthropic works[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Golden Horse Awards". 
  2. ^ Magnoli, Giana. "Filing Deadline Friday for Santa Barbara County Elections". Retrieved 8 March 2012. 
  3. ^ Hollywood's New Blacklist Couldn't Stop Chris Mitchum http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Hollywood/2012/03/30/bh-interview-chris-mitchum