Chinese astrology

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Chinese astrology is based on the traditional astronomy and calendars. The development of Chinese astrology is tied to that of astronomy, which came to flourish during the Han Dynasty (2nd century BC to 2nd century AD).

Chinese astrology has a close relation with Chinese philosophy (theory of the three harmony, heaven, earth and water) and uses the principles of yin and yang and concepts that are not found in Western astrology, such as the wu xing teachings, the 10 Celestial stems, the 12 Earthly Branches, the lunisolar calendar (moon calendar and sun calendar), and the time calculation after year, month, day and shichen (時辰).

Background[edit]

Chinese astrology was elaborated during the Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BC) and flourished during the Han Dynasty (2nd century BC to 2nd century AD). During the Han period the familiar elements of traditional Chinese culture - the Yin-Yang philosophy, theory of the 5 elements, Heaven and Earth, Confucian morality - were brought together to formalize the philosophical principles of Chinese medicine and divination, astrology and alchemy.[1]

The 5 classical planets are associated with the Wu Xing:

According to Chinese astrology, a person's destiny can be determined by the position of the major planets at the person's birth along with the positions of the Sun, Moon and comets and the person's time of birth and zodiac Sign. The system of the twelve-year cycle of animal signs was built from observations of the orbit of Jupiter (the Year Star; simplified Chinese: 岁星; traditional Chinese: 歳星; pinyin: Suìxīng). Following the orbit of Jupiter around the sun, Chinese astronomers divided the celestial circle into 12 sections, and rounded it to 12 years (from 11.86). Jupiter is associated with the constellation Sheti (simplified Chinese: 摄提; traditional Chinese: 攝提- Boötes) and is sometimes called Sheti.

A system of computing one's fate and destiny based on one's birthday, birth season, and birth hours, known as Zi Wei Dou Shu (simplified Chinese: 紫微斗数; traditional Chinese: 紫微斗數; pinyin: zǐwēidǒushù), or Purple Star Astrology, is still used regularly in modern day Chinese astrology to divine one's fortune. The 28 Chinese constellations, Xiu (Chinese: 宿; pinyin: xìu), are quite different from Western constellations. For example, the Big Bear (Ursa Major) is known as Dou (Chinese: ; pinyin: dǒu); the belt of Orion is known as Shen (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: shēn), or the "Happiness, Fortune, Longevity" trio of demigods. The seven northern constellations are referred to as Xuan Wu (Chinese: 玄武; pinyin: xúanwǔ). Xuan Wu is also known as the spirit of the northern sky or the spirit of Water in Taoism belief.

In addition to astrological readings of the heavenly bodies, the stars in the sky form the basis of many fairy tales. For example, the Summer Triangle is the trio of the cowherd (Altair), the weaving maiden fairy (Vega), and the "tai bai" fairy (Deneb). The two forbidden lovers were separated by the silvery river (the Milky Way). Each year on the seventh day of the seventh month in the Chinese calendar, the birds form a bridge across the Milky Way. The cowherd carries their two sons (the two stars on each side of Altair) across the bridge to reunite with their fairy mother. The tai bai fairy acts as the chaperone of these two immortal lovers.

Luni-solar calendar[edit]

The 60-year cycle consists of two separate cycles interacting with each other. The first is the cycle of ten heavenly stems, namely the Five Elements (in order Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water) in their Yin and Yang forms.

The second is the cycle of the twelve zodiac animal signs (生肖 shēngxiào) or Earthly Branches. They are in order as follows: the Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig. In Vietnam the Rabbit is replaced by the cat.

This combination creates the 60-year cycle due to the least amount of years (least common multiple) it would take to get from Yang Wood Rat to its next iteration, which always starts with Yang Wood Rat and ends with Yin Water Pig. Since the zodiac animal cycle of 12 is divisible by two, every zodiac sign can only occur as either Yin or Yang: the Dragon is always yang, the Snake is always yin, etc. The current cycle began in 1984 (as shown in "Table of the sixty-year calendar" below).

When trying to traverse the lunisolar calendar, an easy rule to follow is that years that end in an even number are yang, those that end with an odd number are yin. The cycle proceeds as follows:

However, since the (traditional) Chinese zodiac follows the (lunisolar) Chinese calendar, the switch-over date is the Chinese New Year, not January 1 as in the Gregorian calendar. Therefore, a person who was born in January or early February may have the sign of the previous year. For example, if a person was born in January 1970, his or her element would still be Yin Earth, not Yang Metal. Similarly, although 1990 was called the year of the Horse, anyone born from January 1 to January 26, 1990, was in fact born in the Year of the Snake (the sign of the previous year), because the 1990 Year of the Horse did not begin until January 27, 1990. For this reason, many online sign calculators (and Chinese restaurant place mats) may give a person the wrong sign if he/she was born in January or early February.

The start of a new zodiac is also celebrated on Chinese New Year along with many other customs.

Table of the sixty-year calendar[edit]

The following table shows the 60-year cycle matched up to the Western calendar for the years 1924–2043 (see Sexagenary cycle article for years 1804–1923). This is only applied to Chinese Lunar calendar. The Sexagenary cycle begins at lichun 'about February 4' according to some astrological sources.[2]

 YearAssociated
Element
Heavenly
Stem
Earthly
Branch
Associated
Animal
Year
1924–19831984–2043
1Feb 05 1924–Jan 23 1925Yang WoodRatFeb 02 1984–Jan 21 1985
2Jan 24 1925–Feb 12 1926Yin WoodOxJan 22 1985–Feb 08 1986
3Feb 13 1926–Feb 01 1927Yang FireTigerFeb 09 1986–Jan 28 1987
4Feb 02 1927–Jan 22 1928Yin FireRabbitJan 29 1987–Feb 16 1988
5Jan 23 1928–Feb 09 1929Yang EarthDragonFeb 17 1988–Feb 05 1989
6Feb 10 1929–Jan 29 1930Yin EarthSnakeFeb 06 1989–Jan 26 1990
7Jan 30 1930–Feb 16 1931Yang MetalHorseJan 27 1990–Feb 14 1991
8Feb 17 1931–Feb 05 1932Yin MetalGoatFeb 15 1991–Feb 03 1992
9Feb 06 1932–Jan 25 1933Yang WaterMonkeyFeb 04 1992–Jan 22 1993
10Jan 26 1933–Feb 13 1934Yin WaterRoosterJan 23 1993– Feb 09 1994
11Feb 14 1934–Feb 03 1935Yang WoodDogFeb 10 1994–Jan 30 1995
12Feb 04 1935–Jan 23 1936Yin WoodPigJan 31 1995–Feb 18 1996
13Jan 24 1936–Feb 10 1937Yang FireRatFeb 19 1996–Feb 06 1997
14Feb 11 1937–Jan 30 1938Yin FireOxFeb 07 1997–Jan 27 1998
15Jan 31 1938–Feb 18 1939Yang EarthTigerJan 28 1998–Feb 15 1999
16Feb 19 1939–Feb 07 1940Yin EarthRabbitFeb 16 1999–Feb 04 2000
17Feb 08 1940–Jan 26 1941Yang MetalDragonFeb 05 2000–Jan 23 2001
18Jan 27 1941–Feb 14 1942Yin MetalSnakeJan 24 2001–Feb 11 2002
19Feb 15 1942–Feb 04 1943Yang WaterHorseFeb 12 2002–Jan 31 2003
20Feb 05 1943–Jan 24 1944Yin WaterGoatFeb 01 2003–Jan 21 2004
21Jan 25 1944–Feb 12 1945Yang WoodMonkeyJan 22 2004–Feb 08 2005
22Feb 13 1945–Feb 01 1946Yin WoodRoosterFeb 09 2005–Jan 28 2006
23Feb 02 1946–Jan 21 1947Yang FireDogJan 29 2006–Feb 17 2007
24Jan 22 1947–Feb 09 1948Yin FirePigFeb 18 2007–Feb 06 2008
25Feb 10 1948–Jan 28 1949Yang EarthRatFeb 07 2008–Jan 25 2009
26Jan 29 1949–Feb 16 1950Yin EarthOxJan 26 2009–Feb 13 2010
27Feb 17 1950–Feb 05 1951Yang MetalTigerFeb 14 2010–Feb 02 2011
28Feb 06 1951–Jan 26 1952Yin MetalRabbitFeb 03 2011–Jan 22 2012
29Jan 27 1952–Feb 13 1953Yang WaterDragonJan 23 2012–Feb 09 2013
30Feb 14 1953–Feb 02 1954Yin WaterSnakeFeb 10 2013–Jan 30 2014
31Feb 03 1954–Jan 23 1955Yang WoodHorseJan 31 2014–Feb 18 2015
32Jan 24 1955–Feb 11 1956Yin WoodGoatFeb 19 2015–Feb 07 2016
33Feb 12 1956–Jan 30 1957Yang FireMonkeyFeb 08 2016–Jan 27 2017
34Jan 31 1957–Feb 17 1958Yin FireRoosterJan 28 2017–Feb 15 2018
35Feb 18 1958–Feb 07 1959Yang EarthDogFeb 16 2018–Feb 04 2019
36Feb 08 1959–Jan 27 1960Yin EarthPigFeb 05 2019–Jan 24 2020
37Jan 28 1960–Feb 14 1961Yang MetalRatJan 25 2020–Feb. 11 2021
38Feb 15 1961–Feb 04 1962Yin MetalOxFeb 12 2021–Jan 31 2022
39Feb 05 1962–Jan 24 1963Yang WaterTigerFeb 01 2022–Jan 21 2023
40Jan 25 1963–Feb 12 1964Yin WaterRabbitJan 22 2023–Feb 09 2024
41Feb 13 1964–Feb 01 1965Yang WoodDragonFeb 10 2024–Jan 28 2025
42Feb 02 1965–Jan 20 1966Yin WoodSnakeJan 29 2025–Feb 16 2026
43Jan 21 1966–Feb 08 1967Yang FireHorseFeb 17 2026–Feb 05 2027
44Feb 09 1967–Jan 29 1968Yin FireGoatFeb 06 2027–Jan 25 2028
45Jan 30 1968–Feb 16 1969Yang EarthMonkeyJan 26 2028–Feb 12 2029
46Feb 17 1969–Feb 05 1970Yin EarthRoosterFeb 13 2029–Feb 02 2030
47Feb 06 1970–Jan 26 1971Yang MetalDogFeb 03 2030–Jan 22 2031
48Jan 27 1971–Feb 14 1972Yin MetalPigJan 23 2031–Feb 10 2032
49Feb 15 1972–Feb 02 1973Yang WaterRatFeb 11 2032–Jan 30 2033
50Feb 03 1973–Jan 22 1974Yin WaterOxJan 31 2033–Feb 18 2034
51Jan 23 1974–Feb 10 1975Yang WoodTigerFeb 19 2034–Feb 07 2035
52Feb 11 1975–Jan 30 1976Yin WoodRabbitFeb 08 2035–Jan 27 2036
53Jan 31 1976–Feb 17 1977Yang FireDragonJan 28 2036–Feb 14 2037
54Feb 18 1977–Feb 06 1978Yin FireSnakeFeb 15 2037–Feb 03 2038
55Feb 07 1978–Jan 27 1979Yang EarthHorseFeb 04 2038–Jan 23 2039
56Jan 28 1979–Feb 15 1980Yin EarthGoatJan 24 2039–Feb 11 2040
57Feb 16 1980–Feb 04 1981Yang MetalMonkeyFeb 12 2040–Jan 31 2041
58Feb 05 1981–Jan 24 1982Yin MetalRoosterFeb 01 2041–Jan 21 2042
59Jan 25 1982–Feb 12 1983Yang WaterDogJan 22 2042–Feb 09 2043
60Feb 13 1983–Feb 01 1984Yin WaterPigFeb 10 2043–Jan 29 2044

Wu Xing[edit]

Although it is usually translated as 'element' the Chinese word xing literally means something like 'changing states of being', 'permutations' or 'metamorphoses of being'.[3] In fact Sinologists cannot agree on one single translation. The Chinese conception of 'element' is therefore quite different from the Western one. The Western elements were seen as the basic building blocks of matter. The Chinese 'elements', by contrast, were seen as ever changing and translation of xing is simply 'the five changes'.

木 Wood[edit]

火 Fire[edit]

土 Earth[edit]

金 Metal[edit]

水 Water[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Xiaochun Sun, Jacob Kistemaker, The Chinese sky during the Han: constellating stars and society, pp.3-4. BRILL, 1997. ISBN 978-90-04-10737-3
  2. ^ ""Almanac" "lunar" zodiac beginning of spring as the boundary dislocation? — China Network". 16 February 2009. Retrieved 5 January 2011. 
  3. ^ Wolfram Eberhard, A Dictionary of Chinese Symbols, pg 93, pg 105, pg 309, Routledge and Keegan Paul, London, 1986

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]