Chimichanga

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Chimichanga / Chivichanga
Burrito
Chimichanga.jpg
A chimichanga with rice
Alternative name(s):
Chivichanga, chimmy chonga
Place of origin:
Mexico / United States
Region or state:
Northern Mexico/ Southwestern United States
Main ingredient(s):
Tortillas, rice, cheese, machaca, carne adobada or shredded chicken
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Chimichanga / Chivichanga
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Chimichanga / Chivichanga
 
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Chimichanga / Chivichanga
Burrito
Chimichanga.jpg
A chimichanga with rice
Alternative name(s):
Chivichanga, chimmy chonga
Place of origin:
Mexico / United States
Region or state:
Northern Mexico/ Southwestern United States
Main ingredient(s):
Tortillas, rice, cheese, machaca, carne adobada or shredded chicken
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Chimichanga / Chivichanga
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Chimichanga / Chivichanga

Chimichanga (/ɪmiˈæŋɡə/; Spanish: [tʃimiˈtʃaŋɡa]), also known as chivichanga or chimmy chonga is a deep-fried burrito that is popular in Southwestern U.S. cuisine, Tex-Mex cuisine, and the Mexican states of Sinaloa and Sonora. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with a wide range of ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, machaca, carne adobada, or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried and can be accompanied with salsa, guacamole, sour cream and/or cheese.

Origins[edit]

Debate over the origins of the chimichanga is ongoing:[1][2]

A Chimichanga with refried beans and rice served at an Illinois restaurant.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trulsson, Nora Burba (October 1999), "Chimichanga Mysteries: The Origin of Tucson's Deep-fried Masterpiece is an Enigma Wrapped in a Tortilla", Sunset, retrieved 2009-03-19 
  2. ^ a b Henderson, John (2007-01-24), "We all win as Chimichanga War Rages on", The Denver Post: Food & Dining section, retrieved 2009-03-19 
  3. ^ Matteo Marra, "Tales of the chimichanga's origin"
  4. ^ Chimichanga History and Recipe
  5. ^ Miller, Tom. Jack Ruby's Kitchen Sink: Offbeat Travels Through America's Southwest, p.79.