Chimichanga

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Chimichangas/Chivichangas
Chimichanga.jpg
A chimichanga with rice
Alternative names
Chivichanga, chimmy chonga
Place of origin
Mexico/United States
Region or state
Northern Mexico/Southwestern United States
Main ingredients
Tortillas, rice, cheese, machaca, carne adobada or shredded chicken
Cookbook:Chimichangas/Chivichangas  Chimichangas/Chivichangas
 
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Chimichangas/Chivichangas
Chimichanga.jpg
A chimichanga with rice
Alternative names
Chivichanga, chimmy chonga
Place of origin
Mexico/United States
Region or state
Northern Mexico/Southwestern United States
Main ingredients
Tortillas, rice, cheese, machaca, carne adobada or shredded chicken
Cookbook:Chimichangas/Chivichangas  Chimichangas/Chivichangas

Chimichanga (/ɪmiˈæŋɡə/; Spanish: [tʃimiˈtʃaŋɡa]) is a deep-fried burrito that is popular in Southwestern U.S. cuisine, Tex-Mex cuisine, and the Mexican states of Sinaloa and Sonora. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with a wide range of ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, machaca, carne adobada, or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried and can be accompanied with salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and/or cheese.

Origins[edit]

Debate over the origins of the chimichanga is ongoing:[1][2][3][4]

A chimichanga with refried beans and rice served at an Illinois restaurant.

Knowledge and appreciation of the dish spread slowly outward from the Tucson area, with popularity elsewhere accelerating in recent decades. Though the chimichanga is now found as part of the Tex-Mex repertoire, its roots within the U.S. seem to be in Pima County, Arizona.[8]

Eating a typical 6.5 oz serving on a regular basis is usually not a very healthy lifestyle choice due to the dish relatively high sodium and saturated fat content.[9][10]

References[edit]