Chevrolet Master

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Chevrolet Master and Master Deluxe

1937 Master Coupe
ManufacturerChevrolet Division
of General Motors
Also calledSeries DA (1934)
Series EA and ED (1935)
Series FA and FD (1936)
Series GA and BB (1937)
Series HA and HB (1938)
Series JA (1939)
Production450,435 (Eagle)
35,845 (Mercury)
Model years1934-1942
PredecessorChevrolet Eagle
LayoutFR layout
Engine206 cu in (3.4 L) 6-cylinder
Wheelbase112 in (2,844.8 mm)
RelatedStandard
 
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Chevrolet Master and Master Deluxe

1937 Master Coupe
ManufacturerChevrolet Division
of General Motors
Also calledSeries DA (1934)
Series EA and ED (1935)
Series FA and FD (1936)
Series GA and BB (1937)
Series HA and HB (1938)
Series JA (1939)
Production450,435 (Eagle)
35,845 (Mercury)
Model years1934-1942
PredecessorChevrolet Eagle
LayoutFR layout
Engine206 cu in (3.4 L) 6-cylinder
Wheelbase112 in (2,844.8 mm)
RelatedStandard

The Chevrolet Master and Master Deluxe are American passenger vehicles manufactured by Chevrolet between 1934 and 1942 to replace the 1933 Eagle. It was the more expensive model in the Chevrolet range at this time, with the Mercury and Standard providing a cheaper and smaller range between 1933 to 1937. From 1940 a more expensive version based on the Master Deluxe was launched called the Special Deluxe.

Contents

Model years

The Master name was used on a number of different versions, and the Series name changed each year.

1934 (Series DA)

The Series DA Master replaced the 1933 Eagle, with an increased wheelbase of 112 in (2,844.8 mm). This increased the difference with the cheaper Standard wheelbase to 5 in (127.0 mm). Powered by an upgraded version of the "Stovebolt Six", 206 cu in (3,380 cc) six-cylinder engine, now producing 80 hp (60 kW).

1935 (Series EA and ED)

The Master underwent a redesign, utilising a new "Turret Top" construction method.[1]

1938 (series HA and HB)

The Master (HB) and Master Deluxe (HA) sold well, with 162,430 and 302,728 respectively.[2]

References