Cherokee County, Alabama

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Cherokee County, Alabama
Map of Alabama highlighting Cherokee County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the United States highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
FoundedJanuary 9, 1836
SeatCentre
Largest cityCentre
Area
 • Total599.95 sq mi (1,554 km2)
 • Land553.12 sq mi (1,433 km2)
 • Water46.83 sq mi (121 km2), 7.81%
Population
 • (2010)25,989
 • Density47/sq mi (18/km²)
Congressional districts3rd, 4th
Time zoneCentral: UTC-6/-5
Websitewww.cherokeecounty-al.gov
 
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Cherokee County, Alabama
Map of Alabama highlighting Cherokee County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the United States highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
FoundedJanuary 9, 1836
SeatCentre
Largest cityCentre
Area
 • Total599.95 sq mi (1,554 km2)
 • Land553.12 sq mi (1,433 km2)
 • Water46.83 sq mi (121 km2), 7.81%
Population
 • (2010)25,989
 • Density47/sq mi (18/km²)
Congressional districts3rd, 4th
Time zoneCentral: UTC-6/-5
Websitewww.cherokeecounty-al.gov

Cherokee County, Alabama is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. It is named for the Cherokee tribe. As of the 2010 census the population was 25,989.[1] Its county seat is Centre and it is a prohibition or dry county.

History[edit]

The area included in today's Cherokee County for centuries had belonged to the Cherokee Nation of Native Americans. On December 29, 1835, however, Cherokee leaders signed the controversial Treaty of New Echota, agreeing to surrender their lands in return for new lands west of the Mississippi River.

On January 9, 1836, the Alabama legislature created Cherokee County with its present boundaries. Two years later, the United States government removed by force all Cherokees who had refused to leave on what would become known as the Trail of Tears.

Cherokee County was in the news again on Palm Sunday, March 27, 1994, when it was hit by a Force 4 tornado. Goshen United Methodist Church was destroyed only twelve minutes after the National Weather Service at Birmingham had issued a warning for northern Calhoun, southeastern Etowah, and southern Cherokee counties.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 599.95 square miles (1,553.9 km2), of which 553.12 square miles (1,432.6 km2) (or 92.19%) is land and 46.83 square miles (121.3 km2) (or 7.81%) is water.[2]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18408,773
185013,88458.3%
186018,36032.2%
187011,132−39.4%
188019,10871.6%
189020,4597.1%
190021,0963.1%
191020,226−4.1%
192020,8623.1%
193020,219−3.1%
194019,928−1.4%
195017,634−11.5%
196016,303−7.5%
197015,606−4.3%
198018,76020.2%
199019,5434.2%
200023,98822.7%
201025,9898.3%
Est. 201226,0210.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[3]
2012 Estimate[4]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 23,988 people, 9,719 households, and 7,201 families residing in the county. The population density was 43 people per square mile (17/km2). There were 14,025 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 92.83% White, 5.54% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.35% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. 0.85% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,719 households out of which 28.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.40% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.90% were non-families. 23.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.86.

In the county the population was spread out with 22.20% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 26.70% from 45 to 64, and 15.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 96.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,874, and the median income for a family was $36,920. Males had a median income of $29,978 versus $20,958 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,543. About 11.80% of families and 15.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.40% of those under age 18 and 14.90% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns[edit]

Incorporated[edit]

Unincorporated[edit]

Census-designated place (CDPs)[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ United States Census Bureau. "2010 Census Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  2. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. Retrieved 2011-02-13. 
  3. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Census.gov. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  5. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°10′11″N 85°35′39″W / 34.16972°N 85.59417°W / 34.16972; -85.59417