Cheerios

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Nutrition facts
Serving size 1 cup (28g)
Servings per container 9
Amount per serving
Calories 100Calories from fat 15
% Daily value*
Total fat 2 g3%
   Saturated fat 0 g0%
   Trans fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg0%
Sodium 140 mg6%
Potassium 170 mg5%
Total carbohydrate 20 g7%
   Dietary fiber 3 g1%
   Sugars 1 g
Protein 3 g
Vitamin A10%     Vitamin C10%
Calcium10%     Iron45%
*Percent daily values are based on a 2,000‑calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
 
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A box of Cheerios breakfast cereal.
Nutrition facts
Serving size 1 cup (28g)
Servings per container 9
Amount per serving
Calories 100Calories from fat 15
% Daily value*
Total fat 2 g3%
   Saturated fat 0 g0%
   Trans fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg0%
Sodium 140 mg6%
Potassium 170 mg5%
Total carbohydrate 20 g7%
   Dietary fiber 3 g1%
   Sugars 1 g
Protein 3 g
Vitamin A10%     Vitamin C10%
Calcium10%     Iron45%
*Percent daily values are based on a 2,000‑calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Cheerios is an American brand of breakfast cereals manufactured by General Mills. In some countries, including the United Kingdom, Cheerios is marketed by Cereal Partners under the Nestlé brand; in Australia and New Zealand, Cheerios is sold as an Uncle Tobys product.

History[edit]

Cheerios was introduced on May 1, 1941 as CheeriOats. The name was changed to Cheerios in 1945 due to a trade name dispute with Quaker Oats.[1]

Manufacturing[edit]

All Cheerios shipped to the eastern coast of the United States and eastern Canada are manufactured at the General Mills plant in Buffalo, New York.[2] In 2009, a dispute developed, regarding the FDA considering Cheerios an "unapproved new drug" because of its marketing and health claims.[3]

Advertising[edit]

Characters[edit]

Many television commercials for Cheerios have targeted children featuring animated characters (such as an animated Honeybee). Bullwinkle was featured in early 1960's commercials; being his usual likably klutzy self; the tag line at the end of the ad being "Go with Cheerios!" followed by Bullwinkle, usually worse for wear due to his Cheerios-inspired bravery somewhat backfiring, saying "...but watch where you're going!" Also, Hoppity Hooper was featured in ads in the mid-1960s, as General Mills was the primary sponsor of his animated program.

The Cheerios Kid[edit]

Beginning in the mid-1950s and continuing through the early 1960s, "The Cheerios Kid" was a mainstay in their commercials, ranking alongside many characters created for rival Post's cereals. At first, the Kid was a clumsy, absent-minded tinkerer to the annoyance of his girlfriend, Sue, but would find his footing after eating Cheerios.

In later commercials, the Kid and Sue (often just Sue) would get into trouble (at which point Sue would nonchalantly shout "Help, Kid...") and the Cheerios Kid, after eating Cheerios to "power up", would quickly deal with the problem, often in a creative way. The Kid's oat-produced "Go-power" was represented by bulging biceps with an outline of a Cheerios "o" temporarily tattooed on them; in later commercials, Sue also ate the cereal with similar effect, looking like a tiny female bodybuilder as she joined the Kid in action. The Kid and Sue underwent numerous re-designs over the years, with their height and apparent age subject to change; though their voices seemed to remain constant.

The Cheerios Kid was revived briefly in the late 1980s in similar commercials.

In 2012, The Cheerios Kid and Sue were revived in an online internet video that showed how Cheerios Lowered Cholesterol.

"Just Cheeri-yodel"[edit]

In the late 1970s, Cheerios released a series of commercials featuring an animated "stick-man" chasing a yodeling cereal box with the word "Cheerios" emblazoned on the side. The box kept zooming by the stick-man singing "Cheerio-ee-oh-ee-ohs" and "Yummy Oaty-oh-ee-oh-ee-ohs". The man would try unsuccessfully to catch the elusive box before attempting the Cheeri-yodel himself, at which point the box would land by his side.

The Peanuts Gang[edit]

A bowl of Multi-grain Cheerios.

During the 1980s, a popular series of Cheerios commercials surfaced, featuring the Peanuts gang and a new slogan, "You're on your toes with Cheerios". Some included:

Spoonfuls of Stories[edit]

The Spoonfuls of Stories program, began in 2002, is sponsored by Cheerios and a 50/50 joint venture of General Mills and Simon & Schuster. Five books were published within the program when the book drive occurs.

Shawn Johnson[edit]

In 2009, Olympic gold medalist and World Champion gymnast Shawn Johnson became the first athlete featured on the cover of the Cheerios box. The limited edition cereal box was distributed primarily throughout the Midwestern region of the United States exclusively by the Hy-Vee grocery store chain.

UK 2009[edit]

Cheerios packaging sold in the U.K.

In the UK, a new slogan, "Give those O's a go", is featured in ads featuring Stop-Motion/CGI characters.

Just Checking[edit]

On May 28, 2013, Cheerios posted a video on YouTube. The commercial showcased a little girl, who was mixed race, a Caucasian mother, and an African-American father. The video started a social outtake on Biracial families in media. Many people stated that the commercial was "racist" and that it was "not the modern family". Due to the negative comments on the video Cheerios disabled comments. Since then, the video has been seen by over 3 million people, accruing 21,000 likes and 2,000 dislikes.

Among responses on social media sites, the Fine Brothers produced an episode of their popular Kids React web series with kids responding to this video.[4]

Varieties and flavors[edit]

From the late 1970s until the present, General Mills has introduced a succession of cereals that are variation of the original Cheerios. In Europe, unlike America (where it is made solely of oats), the product contains a mixture of four types of Cheerios, each composed of a different grain: corn, oats, rice and wheat. This mixture has a much higher sugar content.

Cinnamon Nut Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios[edit]

Cinnamon Nut Cheerios was the first departure from original Cheerios in mid-1976. Second was Honey Nut Cheerios, introduced in 1979, marketed to adults as well as children. It is sweeter than the original, with a honey and almond flavor. Cinnamon Nut Cheerios was sold briefly in 1976 and 1977 and was unsuccessful; however, a similar product, "Cinnamon Burst Cheerios," was released in 2011.

All varieties[edit]

Current[edit]

Snack based Products (see above)
Non General Mills derivatives

Discontinued[edit]

2009 Drug Claim[edit]

In May 2009, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sent a letter[3] to General Mills indicating that in their view Cheerios was being sold as an unapproved new drug. This was in response to the labeling on the Cheerios box, which read in part:

• "You can Lower Your Cholesterol 4% in 6 weeks" " • "Did you know that in just 6 weeks Cheerios can reduce bad cholesterol by an average of 4 percent? Cheerios is ... clinically proven to lower cholesterol. A clinical study showed that eating two 1½ cup servings daily of Cheerios cereal reduced bad cholesterol when eaten as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol."

The FDA letter indicated that General Mills needed to change the way it marketed Cheerios or apply for federal approval to sell Cheerios as a drug. General Mills responded with a statement that their claim of soluble fiber content had been approved by the FDA, and that claims about lowering cholesterol had been featured on the box for two years.[6]

In popular culture[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Researchers and General Mills Fight Growing Epidemic of Heart Disease Among Hispanic Americans." BusinessWire HealthWire. 29 March 2001. Look Smart - Find Articles. 22 July 2007.
  2. ^ Watson, Stephen (December 1, 2012). "General Mills in Buffalo: The smell of jobs and history". The Buffalo News. Retrieved January 4, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "General Mills, Inc., Warning Letter" 5 May 2009. Inspections, Compliance, Enforcement, and Criminal Investigations division of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/ICECI/EnforcementActions/WarningLetters/ucm162943.htm
  4. ^ Fine Brothers. "Kids React to Controversial Cheerios Commercial". YouTube. Retrieved July 15, 2013. 
  5. ^ Aiken, Kristen. "The Big Brands Hiding Under Trader Joe's Labels". Huffington Post. 
  6. ^ "Popular cereal is a drug, US food watchdog says". AFP News. 12 May 2009. Archived from the original on 19 May 2009. 
  7. ^ "The Neon Philharmonic Lyrics Morning Girl". lyricstime.com. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 

External links[edit]