Charles D. Tandy

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Charles David Tandy
20070429 Tarrant County Courthouse.JPG
Tarrant County Courthouse as viewed from the Northwest side. A statue of Charles David Tandy is in the foreground. (Note in 2009, the statue was moved to the Neeley School of Business, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas)
Born(1918-05-15)May 15, 1918
Brownsville, Texas
DiedNovember 4, 1978(1978-11-04) (aged 60)
NationalityAmerican
Alma materTexas Christian University
OccupationBusinessperson
OrganizationTandy Corporation
Net worth$28.4 million (at time of death)
Spouse(s)

Gwen Purdy (Johnston) (?-1966)

Anne Burnett m. 1969
Parents

Dave L. Tandy (1889–1966)

Carmen McLain
 
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Charles David Tandy
20070429 Tarrant County Courthouse.JPG
Tarrant County Courthouse as viewed from the Northwest side. A statue of Charles David Tandy is in the foreground. (Note in 2009, the statue was moved to the Neeley School of Business, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas)
Born(1918-05-15)May 15, 1918
Brownsville, Texas
DiedNovember 4, 1978(1978-11-04) (aged 60)
NationalityAmerican
Alma materTexas Christian University
OccupationBusinessperson
OrganizationTandy Corporation
Net worth$28.4 million (at time of death)
Spouse(s)

Gwen Purdy (Johnston) (?-1966)

Anne Burnett m. 1969
Parents

Dave L. Tandy (1889–1966)

Carmen McLain

Charles David Tandy (15 May 1918 - 4 November 1978) was the Chairman of the Board, President, and Chief Executive Officer of the Tandy Corporation.[1]

Biography[edit]

Charles Tandy was born in Brownsville, Texas to Dave L. Tandy, who ran the Hinckley-Tandy Leather Company with his friend Norton Hinckley. He was educated at the R. L. Paschal High School. In 1940 he graduated from Texas Christian University. He then spent some time at the Harvard Business School before joining the US Navy for the remainder of World War II. While in the Navy he set a record for selling war bonds.

Charles developed his small family leather business into an international corporation. He first turned it into a leathercraft company when shoe rationing in World War II almost killed the business, and later expanded into selling leather and tools to make such products as wallets. After a struggle over the company, which saw the Hinckley name dropped, the company was renamed to Tandy Corporation. In 1963, Tandy acquired the ailing RadioShack, a chain of nine retail stores in the Boston area.

Tandy died of a heart attack in his sleep, on 4 November 1978.[1]

Awards and recognition[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Radio Shack's Charles Tandy Dead at 60". The Intelligent Machines Journal 1: 1. 11 December 1978. ISSN 0199-6649. 
  2. ^ "Dateline Award Recipients". American Advertising Federation of Fort Worth. Retrieved 2010-06-09. 

External links[edit]