Charles Kirbo

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Charles Hughes Kirbo (March 5, 1917 – September 2, 1996) was an American lawyer and longtime advisor to Jimmy Carter.

Early life and legal career[edit]

Kirbo was born on March 5, 1917, in Bainbridge, Georgia.[1] He graduated from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1939 and later served in the United States Army in World War II.[1] In 1960, Kirbo became a partner in the law firm of King & Spalding.[1]

Political career[edit]

Kirbo first represented Jimmy Carter in 1962 when Carter lost the Democratic primary for a Georgia state senate seat.[1][2] After Kirbo was able to establish that the primary results were fraudulent, Carter won the nomination and then the general election.[1][2] In 1971, then-Governor Jimmy Carter offered to appoint Kirbo the United States Senate seat left vacant by the death of Richard Russell, but Kirbo declined.[1][2] When Carter was elected President, Kirbo was considered as a possible White House Chief of Staff.[3] Kirbo was also considered to be a candidate for the Supreme Court if a vacancy had occurred under a Carter Presidency.[4]

Death[edit]

Kirbo died on September 2, 1996 in Atlanta of complications from gall bladder surgery.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Lawrence Van Gelder, Charles H. Kirbo, 79, Is Dead; Was Carter's Closest Adviser, The New York Times (September 4, 1996).
  2. ^ a b c The Nation: The Charlie Behind Jimmy, Time Magazine (July 12, 1976).
  3. ^ Dumbrell, John (1995). The Carter Presidency: A Re-Evaluation. Manchester University Press. p. 32. ISBN 978-0-7190-4693-3. 
  4. ^ Dumbrell, John (1995). The Carter Presidency: A Re-Evaluation. Manchester University Press. p. 77. ISBN 978-0-7190-4693-3.