Charles Smith (developer)

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Charles Emil Smith
BornSchmidoff
(1901-03-28)March 28, 1901
Lipnick, Russia
DiedDecember 30, 1995(1995-12-30) (aged 94)
Palm Beach, Florida
Cause of death
heart attack
EthnicityJewish
Educationdegree in accounting
Alma materCity College of New York
Occupationbuilder, real estate developer, philanthropist
Years activein business until 1967; philanthropist thereafter
OrganizationCharles E. Smith Companies
Board member of
George Washington University trustee 1967–1976
Spouse(s)Leah (m. ~1926/7–death 1972)
Miriam Uretz Smith (div. 1988)
ChildrenArlene Kogod, Robert H. Smith
ParentsSadie & Reuven Schmidoff
RelativesRobert Kogod, son-in-law
Awards

honorary doctorates from:

Notes
 
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Charles Emil Smith
BornSchmidoff
(1901-03-28)March 28, 1901
Lipnick, Russia
DiedDecember 30, 1995(1995-12-30) (aged 94)
Palm Beach, Florida
Cause of death
heart attack
EthnicityJewish
Educationdegree in accounting
Alma materCity College of New York
Occupationbuilder, real estate developer, philanthropist
Years activein business until 1967; philanthropist thereafter
OrganizationCharles E. Smith Companies
Board member of
George Washington University trustee 1967–1976
Spouse(s)Leah (m. ~1926/7–death 1972)
Miriam Uretz Smith (div. 1988)
ChildrenArlene Kogod, Robert H. Smith
ParentsSadie & Reuven Schmidoff
RelativesRobert Kogod, son-in-law
Awards

honorary doctorates from:

Notes

Charles E. Smith (March 28, 1901 – December 30, 1995)[1][2] was a real estate developer and philanthropist in the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Biography[edit]

Smith (born Schmidoff),[1] immigrated from Russia in 1911. He spoke only Yiddish when he arrived in the United States.[1] He started as a developer in Brooklyn, but lost everything in the Great Depression.

He moved to Rockville, MD where he first developed apartments and later office buildings. He founded the Charles E. Smith Co. and developed the Crystal City area of Arlington, Virginia. He retired in 1967 and turned to philanthropy.[1]

Philanthropy[edit]

He planned a complex in Rockville for Jewish agencies including the Hebrew Home for the Aged, the Jewish Social Service Agency and the Jewish Community Center. He was a trustee of George Washington University (GWU) from 1967 to 1976 as well as Chairman of the Committee on University Development. The Charles E. Smith Athletic Center at George Washington University is named in his honor.[4] He played a key role in developing GWU's branch campus in Loudoun County, Virginia.

His contributions to Jewish philanthropy include:

Smith held honorary doctorates from Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Jewish Theological Seminary and George Washington University.[1] In 1997 he was posthumously awarded an Honor Award from the National Building Museum alongside other community developers of Washington, D.C., including Morris Cafritz and Charles A. Horsky.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Weil, Martin (January 1, 1996). "Washington Builder, Philanthropist Charles E. Smith Dies". Washington Post. p. A1. 
  2. ^ a b Smith, David Bruce. Conversations with Papa Charlie: A Memory of Charles E. Smith. Capital Books, Inc. p. xiv. ISBN 978-1-892123-34-3. Retrieved 2010-02-16. 
  3. ^ "George Washington University Official Athletic Site – Athletics". August 31, 2009. Retrieved 2013-01-20.  Smith Center at George Washington University
  4. ^ "Smith and Kogod families commit $10 million for transformational renovation of Charles E. Smith Center". February 14, 2008. Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  5. ^ "Smith Elkes Laboratory". Jerusalem: The National Institute for Psychobiology. Retrieved 2013-01-20. 
  6. ^ "Founders and Patrons – Mr. Charles E. Smith". Jerusalem: The National Institute for Psychobiology. Retrieved 2013-01-20. 
  7. ^ "Judaic Studies at GW". Judaic Studies Program – The George Washington University. Retrieved 2013-01-20. "...establishment of the Charles E. Smith Chair in Judaic Studies in 1979..." 
  8. ^ "Va. Trust Hopes to Buy Battlefield; Down Payment Applied To Chancellorsville Site". Washington Post. 1997-11-13. 

Writings[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]