Charles Avery

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Charles Avery
BornCharles Avery Bradford
(1873-05-28)May 28, 1873
Chicago, Illinois, United States
DiedJuly 23, 1926(1926-07-23) (aged 53)
Los Angeles, California, United States
OccupationActor, film director and screenwriter
Years active1897–1926
Spouse(s)Catherine ? (?-19?)[1]
Margaret E Royster (1914–?)[2]
 
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For the Scottish artist, see Charles Avery (artist).
Charles Avery
BornCharles Avery Bradford
(1873-05-28)May 28, 1873
Chicago, Illinois, United States
DiedJuly 23, 1926(1926-07-23) (aged 53)
Los Angeles, California, United States
OccupationActor, film director and screenwriter
Years active1897–1926
Spouse(s)Catherine ? (?-19?)[1]
Margaret E Royster (1914–?)[2]

Charles Avery (May 28, 1873 – July 23, 1926) was an American silent-film actor, film director, and screenwriter.[clarification needed]

One of the original seven Keystone Kops,[3] Avery directed Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle in thirty-one comedies while at Keystone Studios.[citation needed]

Early life and education[edit]

He was born Charles Avery Bradford in Chicago, Illinois.

His sister Charlotte was also an actress,[4] as was his mother Marie Stanley.[4] His father was a playwright.[4]

Career[edit]

He started acting in the theatre, playing the title role in Charley's Aunt,[5][6] and the part of Pegleg Hopkins in the adaptation of David Harum which had William H. Crane in the lead role.[7][8]

Avery appeared in a touring production of The Clansman as Governor Shrimp,[4][9] before entering films with the Biograph Company in 1908.

From 1908 to 1909, Avery featured in 33 short films under the direction of D. W. Griffith, usually only in supporting roles and often alongside Mack Sennett.

In 1913, he tried his hand at directing, starting with Across the Alley at Keystone Studios. Avery went on to direct Syd Chaplin in the Gussle series and Charles Murray in the Hogan series. He also continued to act, notably in the first three Keystone Kops films.

Leaving directorial duties in the 1920s, Avery later played supporting roles in low-budget Westerns such as The Rambling Ranger and Western Rover.

Death[edit]

On July 23, 1926, Avery was found dead in his Los Angeles home.[10] His death was later ruled a suicide.

Filmography[edit]

Director[edit]

  • Across the Alley (1913)
  • Across the Hall (1914)
  • The Knockout (1914)
  • Love and Salt Water (1914)
  • The Great Toe Mystery (1914)
  • Her Last Chance (1914)
  • Hogan's Annual Spree (1914)
  • His Second Childhood (1914)
  • Gussle's Wayward Path (1915)
  • Hogan's Wild Oats (1915)
  • Rum and Wall Paper (1915)
  • Hogan's Mussy Job (1915)
  • Hogan, the Porter (1915)
  • Hogan's Romance Upset (1915)
  • Hogan's Aristocratic Dream (1915)
  • Hogan Out West (1915)
  • Gussle's Day of Rest (1915)
  • The Beauty Bunglers (1915)
  • Gussle's Wayward Way (1915)
  • Their Social Splash (1915)
  • Gussle Tied to Trouble (1915)
  • Gussle's Backward Way (1915)
  • A Submarine Pirate (1915)
  • A Modern Enoch Arden (1916)
  • His Lying Heart (1916)
  • Her Birthday Knight (1917)
  • Her Candy Kid (1917)
  • Done in Oil (1917)
  • The House of Scandal (1917)
  • Her Donkey Love (1917)
  • His Unconscious Conscience (1917)
  • Caught in the End (1917/I)
  • A Kaiser There Was (1919)
  • The Riot (1921)
  • The Applicant (1921)

Stageplays[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chas A Bradford". New York State Census, 1905. FamilySearch. Retrieved February 16, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Charles Avery Bradford". California, County Marriages, 1850–1952. FamilySearch. Retrieved February 16, 2010. 
  3. ^ Lahue, Kalton (1971); Mack Sennett's Keystone: The man, the myth and the comedies; New York: Barnes; ISBN 978-0-498-07461-5. p. 194.
  4. ^ a b c d "Death of Charlotte Deane". The New York Dramatic Mirror. September 8, 1906. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Professional Cards: Charles Avery". The New York Dramatic Mirror. August 6, 1898. p. 20. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Pike Opera House, Cincinnati, Ohio". New York Clipper. May 7, 1897. p. 159. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  7. ^ "William H. Crane Enacts David Harum". Utica Observer. April 9, 1900. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Plays and Play People". Utica Sunday Journal. May 5, 1901. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Reflections". The New York Dramatic Mirror. April 28, 1906. p. 10. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Body Of Movie Actor Dead 4 Days Found". The Oxnard Daily Courier. July 23, 1923. Retrieved February 16, 2012. 

External links[edit]