Chapmanville, West Virginia

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Chapmanville, West Virginia
Town
Location of Chapmanville, West Virginia
Location of Chapmanville, West Virginia
Coordinates: 37°58′18″N 82°1′12″W / 37.97167°N 82.02000°W / 37.97167; -82.02000Coordinates: 37°58′18″N 82°1′12″W / 37.97167°N 82.02000°W / 37.97167; -82.02000
CountryUnited States
StateWest Virginia
CountyLogan
Area[1]
 • Total0.67 sq mi (1.74 km2)
 • Land0.65 sq mi (1.68 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation640 ft (195 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total1,256
 • Estimate (2012[3])1,257
 • Density1,932.3/sq mi (746.1/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code25508
Area code(s)304
FIPS code54-14524[4]
GNIS feature ID1537207[5]
 
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Chapmanville, West Virginia
Town
Location of Chapmanville, West Virginia
Location of Chapmanville, West Virginia
Coordinates: 37°58′18″N 82°1′12″W / 37.97167°N 82.02000°W / 37.97167; -82.02000Coordinates: 37°58′18″N 82°1′12″W / 37.97167°N 82.02000°W / 37.97167; -82.02000
CountryUnited States
StateWest Virginia
CountyLogan
Area[1]
 • Total0.67 sq mi (1.74 km2)
 • Land0.65 sq mi (1.68 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation640 ft (195 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total1,256
 • Estimate (2012[3])1,257
 • Density1,932.3/sq mi (746.1/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code25508
Area code(s)304
FIPS code54-14524[4]
GNIS feature ID1537207[5]

Chapmanville is a town in Logan County, West Virginia, in the United States. The population was 1,256 at the 2010 census. Chapmanville was founded in 1800 and named for an early settler named Ned Chapman, who owned a store and ran the post office.[6] It was incorporated in 1947.[7]

Geography[edit]

Chapmanville is located at 37°58′18″N 82°1′12″W / 37.97167°N 82.02000°W / 37.97167; -82.02000 (37.971615, -82.020017),[8] along the Guyandotte River.[9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.67 square miles (1.74 km2), of which, 0.65 square miles (1.68 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
19901,110
20001,2119.1%
20101,2563.7%


2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,256 people, 604 households, and 338 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,932.3 inhabitants per square mile (746.1 /km2). There were 667 housing units at an average density of 1,026.2 per square mile (396.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.2% White, 0.2% African American, 0.6% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 0.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 604 households of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.7% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 44.0% were non-families. 40.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.77.

The median age in the town was 42.4 years. 18.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.1% were from 25 to 44; 27.5% were from 45 to 64; and 19.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 46.1% male and 53.9% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,211 people, 581 households, and 330 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,797.4 inhabitants per square mile (697.9/km²). There were 658 housing units at an average density of 976.6 per square mile (379.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.84% White, 0.74% Asian, and 0.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.41% of the population.

There were 581 households out of which 23.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.8% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.2% were non-families. 40.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the town the population was spread out with 19.0% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 19.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 77.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 76.4 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $23,077, and the median income for a family was $38,250. Males had a median income of $28,500 versus $20,769 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,581. About 12.1% of families and 20.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.7% of those under age 18 and 16.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Chapmanville is home to one High School housing grades 9-12, one middle school housing grades 5-8, and two elementary schools housing grades PreK-4. Chapmanville hosts the second largest student population in the county. All schools in the city use one mascot as their school identities. The mascot of choice is the Tiger. The student body consists of students from a consolidation agreement with the West Virginia Department of Education, West Virginia School Building Authority, Lincoln County Schools and Logan County Schools to consolidate Harts High School and Chapmanville High School to form the Chapmanville Regional High School. It opened on June 1, 2007 and is currently under the leadership of principal Kathy Moore.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-24. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-24. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-26. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Kenny, Hamill (1945). West Virginia Place Names: Their Origin and Meaning, Including the Nomenclature of the Streams and Mountains. Piedmont, West Virginia: The Place Name Press. p. 164. 
  7. ^ West Virginia Blue Book. Published annually by the Clerk's Office of the West Virginia Senate.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ West Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer. Yarmouth, Me.: DeLorme. 1997. p. 51. ISBN 0-89933-246-3.