Chadic languages

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Chadic
Geographic
distribution:
Nigeria, Niger, Chad, Central African Republic, Cameroon
Linguistic classification:Afro-Asiatic
  • Chadic
Subdivisions:
ISO 639-5:cdc
Afroasiatic-en.svg
 
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Chadic
Geographic
distribution:
Nigeria, Niger, Chad, Central African Republic, Cameroon
Linguistic classification:Afro-Asiatic
  • Chadic
Subdivisions:
ISO 639-5:cdc
Afroasiatic-en.svg

The Chadic languages constitute a language family of perhaps 150 languages spoken across northern Nigeria, southern Niger, southern Chad, Central African Republic and nortern Cameroon, belonging to the Afroasiatic phylum. The most widely spoken Chadic language is Hausa, a lingua franca of much of inland West Africa.

Newman (1977) divided the family into four groups, which have been accepted in all subsequent literature. The subbranching, however, is not as robust; Blench (2006), for example, only accepts the A/B bifurcation of East Chadic.[1]

(A) the Hausa, Ron, Bole, and Angas languages; and
(B) the Bade, Warji, and Zaar languages.
(A) the Bura, Kamwe, and Bata languages, among other groups;
(B) the Buduma and Musgu languages; and
(C) Gidar
(A) the Tumak, Nancere, and Kera languages; and
(B) the Dangaléat, Mukulu, and Sokoro languages
Chadic Languages.jpg

Contents

Origin

Proto-Chadic language is believed*[by whom?] to have originated in Asia before it entered Africa as early as 7 kya,[citation needed] probably before or after the First Egyptian Dynasty. The speakers of Proto-Chadic might have been a Levantine population[citation needed] dating back to an Africa migration. And they played a larger roll in the diffusion of Euro-Asian Y-Chromosome R1b R-V88 into Africa[citation needed].

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