Cessna 180

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Model 180 Skywagon
Cessna.180a.g-btsm.arp.jpg
RoleLight utility aircraft
ManufacturerCessna Aircraft Company
First flight1952
Introduction1953
Produced19531981
Number built6,193
VariantsCessna 182
Cessna 185
St-Just Cyclone
St-Just Super-Cyclone
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Model 180 Skywagon
Cessna.180a.g-btsm.arp.jpg
RoleLight utility aircraft
ManufacturerCessna Aircraft Company
First flight1952
Introduction1953
Produced19531981
Number built6,193
VariantsCessna 182
Cessna 185
St-Just Cyclone
St-Just Super-Cyclone

The Cessna 180 is a four- or six-seat, fixed conventional gear general aviation airplane which was produced between 1953 and 1981. Though the design is no longer in production, many of these aircraft are still in use as personal aircraft and in utility roles such as bush flying.[1]

Development[edit]

1960 Cessna 180 Skywagon

Cessna introduced the heavier and more powerful 180 as a complement to the Cessna 170. It eventually came to be known as the Skywagon.[1]

The prototype Cessna 180, N41697, first flew on May 26, 1952. Cessna engineering test pilot William D. Thompson was at the controls.[2]

In all its versions, 6,193 Cessna 180s were manufactured. In 1956, a tricycle gear version of this design was introduced as the Cessna 182, which came to bear the name Skylane. Additionally, in 1960, Cessna introduced a heavier, more powerful sibling to the 180, the conventional gear Cessna 185. For a time, all three versions of the design were in production.[1]

Design[edit]

The airframe of the 180 is all-metal, constructed of aluminum alloy. The fuselage is a semi-monocoque structure, with exterior skin sheets riveted to formers and longerons. The strut-braced wings, likewise, are constructed of exterior skin sheets riveted to spars and ribs. The landing gear of the 180 is in a conventional arrangement, with main gear legs made of spring steel, and a steerable tailwheel mounted on a hollow tapered steel tube.[1]

Cessna 180s produced between 1953 and 1963 have two side windows, while 1964 to 1981 models feature three side windows, as they use the same fuselage as the Cessna 185. 180s can be equipped with floats and skis.[1]

Operational history[edit]

Record flight[edit]

Jerrie Mock's Cessna 180

The Cessna 180 gained recognition as the aircraft chosen by Geraldine Mock, the first woman pilot to successfully fly around the world. The flight was made in 1964 in her 1953 model, the Spirit of Columbus (N1538C), as chronicled in her book Three-Eight Charlie.[3] The Cessna factory obtained the aircraft and kept it at the Pawnee (Wichita, Kansas) manufacturing plant after the epic flight, suspended from the ceiling over one of the manufacturing lines. It is currently on display at the National Air and Space Museum.

Variants[edit]

180
Four seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 225 hp (168 kW) Continental O-470-A, O-470-J, or a 230 hp (172 kW) O-470-K engine, landplane gross weight 2,550 lb (1,157 kg) and first certified on 23 December 1952.[4]
1957 Cessna 180A on landing
180A
Four seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-K, landplane gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and first certified on 17 December 1956.[4]
1959 Cessna 180B on amphibious floats
1959 Cessna 180B on floats
180B
Four seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-K, landplane gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and first certified on 22 August 1958.[4]
180C
Four seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R, landplane gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and first certified on 8 July 1959.[4]
1961 Cessna 180D
180D
Four seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R, landplane gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and first certified on 14 June 1960.[4]
180E
Four seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R, landplane gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and first certified on 21 September 1961.[4]
180F
Four seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R, landplane gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and first certified on 25 June 1962.[4]
Cessna 180G with belly cargo pod and tundra tires
180G
Six seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R, landplane gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and first certified on 19 July 1963.[4]
180H
Six seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R, landplane gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and first certified on 17 June 1964.[4]
180I
There was no "I" model Cessna 180.[4]
180J
Six seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R or O-470-S, landplane gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and first certified on 13 October 1972.[4]
180K
Six seat high wing light aircraft powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-U, landplane gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and first certified on 19 August 1976.[4]

Operators[edit]

Civil[edit]

The Cessna 180 is popular with air charter companies and is operated by private individuals and companies.

Military[edit]

 Australia

19 Cessna 180s were in service with both the Australian Army and RAAF from 1959 to 1974.

 El Salvador[7]
 Guatemala[7]
 Honduras
 Israel
 Nicaragua[9]
 Philippines[9]
 Thailand
 Uruguay

Specifications (1978 Cessna 180 II landplane)[edit]

Data from Cessna[10]

General characteristics

Performance

See also[edit]

Related development

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Christy, Joe The Complete Guide to the Single-Engine Cessnas 3rd ed, TAB Books, Blue Ridge Summit PA USA, 1979, pp 29–39
  2. ^ Thompson, William D. "The C-180 Story". International 180–185 Club. Retrieved 2009-04-15. 
  3. ^ Mock, Jerrie: Three-Eight Charlie, First Edition, 1970. ISBN 75118975
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Federal Aviation Administration (March 2003). "TYPE CERTIFICATE DATA SHEET NO. 5A6 Revision 66". Retrieved 2010-03-10. 
  5. ^ RAAF Museum website Cessna 180 page retrieved on 9 January 2009.
  6. ^ "Unit History". 161 Possums of Vietnam. Retrieved 2006-09-18. 
  7. ^ a b c d "Air Forces of the World", Flight International magazine, 24–30 July 1996, p29-60.
  8. ^ Jewish Virtual Library – Israeli Air Force Cessna 180 page retrieved on 9 January 2009.
  9. ^ a b c Gaines, Mike. "World's Air Forces 1982", Flight International magazine, 6 November 1982, p1327-1388.
  10. ^ Cessna Aircraft Company: 1978 Cessna Skywagons 180 & 185, page 10. Cessna Aircraft, Wichita, Kansas 1978. SPA 78009-15

External links[edit]