C.O.P.S.

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C.O.P.S.
Copslogo.jpg
Logo shown for C.O.P.S.
FormatAnimated series
Action
Written byPhil Harnage
Directed byKevin Altieri
StarringKen Ryan
Paul De La Rosa
Len Carlson
Ron Rubin
Paulina Gillis
John Stocker
Marvin Goldhar
Jeri Craden
Darrin Baker
Elizabeth Hanna
Nick Nichols
Ray James
Mary Long
Dan Hennessey
Jane Schoettle
Brent Titcomb
Michael Fantini
Barbara Hamilton
Ray Kahnert
Joe Roncetti
Ruth Springford
and Noam Zylberman
Country of originUnited States
No. of episodes65 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)Andy Heyward
Producer(s)Richard Raynis
Running time30 mins
Production company(s)DIC Entertainment
Hasbro
DistributorClaster Television, Inc.
Broadcast
Original channelSyndication
Original runSeptember 19, 1988 – February 20, 1989
 
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C.O.P.S.
Copslogo.jpg
Logo shown for C.O.P.S.
FormatAnimated series
Action
Written byPhil Harnage
Directed byKevin Altieri
StarringKen Ryan
Paul De La Rosa
Len Carlson
Ron Rubin
Paulina Gillis
John Stocker
Marvin Goldhar
Jeri Craden
Darrin Baker
Elizabeth Hanna
Nick Nichols
Ray James
Mary Long
Dan Hennessey
Jane Schoettle
Brent Titcomb
Michael Fantini
Barbara Hamilton
Ray Kahnert
Joe Roncetti
Ruth Springford
and Noam Zylberman
Country of originUnited States
No. of episodes65 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)Andy Heyward
Producer(s)Richard Raynis
Running time30 mins
Production company(s)DIC Entertainment
Hasbro
DistributorClaster Television, Inc.
Broadcast
Original channelSyndication
Original runSeptember 19, 1988 – February 20, 1989

C.O.P.S. (Central Organization of Police Specialists) is an American animated television series released by DIC Entertainment (distributed by Claster Television) and Celebrity Home Entertainment (some VHS tapes went through Golden Book Video, though). This cartoon, which ran from 1988–1989, used the tag line: "Fighting crime in a future time, protecting Empire City from Big Boss and his gang of crooks".[1] In 1993, the series was shown in reruns on CBS Saturday mornings as CyberCOPS, the name change due to the 1989 debut of the unrelated primetime reality show of the same name.[2] The show was based on Hasbro's 1988 line of action figures called C.O.P.S 'N' Crooks.[3]

Contents

Plot

As a last resort, Mayor Davis sends in Special Agent Baldwin P. Vess (Codename: Bulletproof) to take him down. However, Bulletproof suffered very serious injuries in a car wreck during a fight with Big Boss' criminal henchmen and had to be taken to the hospital, where he is given a cybernetic bullet-resistant torso to save his life as it would take years for his torso to recover.

While staying at the hospital, Bulletproof, knowing he cannot do all of this alone, sends out Police Officer P.J. O'Malley (Codename: LongArm) and rookie Officer Donny Brooks (Codename: HardTop) to round up the best law enforcers from all over the country. With these men and women — including David E. "Highway" Harlson, Colt "Mace" Howards, Stan "Barricade" Hyde, Tina "Mainframe" Cassidy, Walker "Sundown" Calhoun, Suzie "Mirage" Young, Hugh S. "Bullseye" Forward, and Rex "Bowser" Pointer and his robot dog, Blitz — he forms a team that is “the finest law enforcement agency there is in the country.” Bulletproof becomes the proud founder and commander of C.O.P.S. Together, he and his C.O.P.S. team are able to take down Big Boss and his gang of crooks and thwart the first of many of Big Boss' criminal schemes.[5]

Each episode has a title that begins with “The Case of…” with a different phrase being added to it (i.e. “The Case of the Iron C.O.P.S. and Wooden CROOKS”; “The Case of the Half-Pint Hero”; and “The Case of the Crime Nobody Heard”) along with the C.O.P.S. file number. Bulletproof would narrate at the beginning of the episode as well as the end, concluding by repeating the C.O.P.S. file number and title, ending it with “Case Closed” with an “Closed” mark being stamped onto the file folder. The two exceptions are the first parts each of the two-parter episodes, “The Case of Big Boss' Master Plan” and “The Case of C.O.P.S. File #1,” where the conclusion of the episode is marked with a “Case Continued” plastered on the files.

In the cartoon, the C.O.P.S. frequently shouted, “It's Crime Fighting Time!” as a battle cry when it was time to bag the CROOKS and solve a caper. Meanwhile, the CROOKS would shout “Crime's a-wasting!” whenever they went to do another caper, whether it was pulling another heist (as in so many episodes such as “The Case of the Blur Bandits”), giving C.O.P.S. a hard time to the point of replacing (actually disposing) them for good (as in “The Case of the Big Boss' Master Plan”) or taking captive a certain individual to be held prisoner for ransom (as in “The Case of the Ransomed Rascal”).

The music for the series was created by Shuki Levy, while the C.O.P.S. theme music was written and composed by Haim Saban, and sung by Nick Carr.

Numerous characters were featured in the cartoon that did not have action figures (Including Mainframe, Brian O'Malley, Whitney Morgan, Nightshade, Ms. Demeanor, and Mirage).

Cast and characters

C.O.P.S.

C.R.O.O.K.S.

Minor Criminals

Not all enemies of C.O.P.S. are members of Big Boss' gang:

Supporting characters

Minor characters

Episodes

Stations

DVD releases

On February 28, 2006, Shout! Factory released C.O.P.S.- Volume 1, a 4-disc boxset featuring the first 22 episodes on DVD in Region 1.[9] It includes concept art, storyboard-to-screen, and some of the original PSAs that were shown after the episodes. Volume 2 featuring 21 episodes was released as a Shout! Factory select title, available exclusively through their online store.[10]

In October 2010, Mill Creek Entertainment announced that they had acquired the rights to the series and would be releasing it in its entirety.[11] They subsequently released Volume 1, featuring the first 32 episodes of the series, on February 15, 2011.[12] Volume 2, featuring the remaining 33 episodes, was released on September 13, 2011.[13]

DVD NameEp #Release Date
C.O.P.S. Volume 132February 15, 2011
C.O.P.S. Volume 233September 13, 2011

In both the Shout! Factory and Mill Creek Entertainment volume 1 sets, Part 1 of “The Case of C.O.P.S. File #1” has the two introduction scenes of Highway and Sundown excised from the episode. The three-episode DVD single, C.O.P.S.—Fighting Crime in a Future Time, released by Sterling on November 13, 2003, does have the footage, however.

C.O.P.S. 'N' Crooks

C.O.P.S ’n’ Crooks was a line of action figures produced by Hasbro and sold between 1988 and 1989. These figures are made up of police and criminals of the future and uses the tagline: "Fighting Crime in a Future Time."

C.O.P.S. figures from left to right: Taser, Barricade, Bulletproof, Sundown, Nightstick, Checkpoint
Crooks Action figures from left to right: Rock Krusher, Louie the Plumber, Big Boss, Buttons McBoomBoom, Berserko

In the packages containing the C.O.P.S. figures, only the C.O.P.S. logo is shown while the packages containing the CROOKS figure features only the phrase "N'CROOKS" shown right next to the logo. Each figure, fully articulated and poseable, standing about six inches tall on the average, came with cap gun accessories that allowed kids, who played with them, to fire off their weapons by pulling back the trigger and releasing it to cause a spark and a popping noise when the trigger slams into a strip of cap firing paper.

Each figure also had a file card printed on the back of the package that contained a biography of the character. These file cards were written by Larry Hama, who also wrote the file cards for Hasbro’s G.I. Joe action figures. The artwork made for each package is illustrated by Bart Sears, Mark Pennington, and McNabb Studios.

Several female C.O.P.S. and Crooks characters (Mainframe, Nightshade, Mirage, and Ms. Demeanor) appeared in the cartoon and the comics, but were never released as action figures.

C.O.P.S. For Kids

At the end of each episode of C.O.P.S., a special PSA segment known as C.O.P.S. For Kids is shown either in animated form featuring the C.O.P.S. and CROOKS or in live action form with real-life police officers giving kids information about safety issues. These included staying away from drugs, gangs, how to be safe at home and on the street, and how to help in preventing crime. Each and every C.O.P.S. for Kids segment was made with the blessing and assistance of organizations like DARE, the National Crime Prevention Council and the California Highway Patrol. These segments were omitted from some international broadcasts of the show.

C.O.P.S. PSA EpisodeSummary
LongArm and Brian: "Don't go into dark alleys"Brian and a friend walks past a dark alley with Berserko lurking inside. Later Brian walks up to a back alley and turns away just as Rock Krusher was walking forward twirling around his handcuffs. This is an example of LongArm and his son showing everyone to go neither into dark alleys nor take deserted shortcuts because one never knows who or what is lurking in there.
Longarm and Brian: "No Smoking"Brian has decided to try smoking a cigarette. One whiff, and he starts coughing. From this, Brian learns to think twice before smoking with Longarm affirming his decision.
LongArm and Brian: "Don't Ride with Drunk Drivers"Brian is confronted by a carpool filled with drunken people who asks if he needs a lift. Brian remembers what his father said, "It's a bad risk to ride in the car with someone behind the wheel who's been drinking." Brian says, "No Thanks." And the car speeds away only to crash into something off camera. LongArm in front of the precinct tells the views to stick with good risks, such as trying out for a team you're not certain you'll going to make it. Bad risks are for people who like to lose.
Bulletproof: "Say 'no' to Alcohol and Cigarettes"Bulletproof shows to the viewers a TV beer commercial and a smoking ad in a magazine and says, "You can have a good time without smoking or drinking. Alcohol and Cigarettes are drugs. Say 'no'."
Rock Krusher: "Gangs"In his prison cell, Rock Krusher talks about his boyhood days when he was once part of a gang that got involved with a deadly brawl against a rival gang one night. He escaped and was lucky that he was merely arrested afterwards and not killed like some of his friends were. This is a rare instance of a "villian" character being allowed to host a PSA segment in a cartoon. In most PSAs, participating "villian" characters are limited to acting in a supporting role as the bad example while an established "good" character delivers the message.
Dr. Badvibes, Buzzbomb, and Bulletproof: "Cars are not toys"BadVibes and Buzzbomb were going for a ride in a car. But BadVibes realized he forgot something so he tells Buzzbomb not to play with the car while he goes for something and leaves. Disobedient, Buzzbomb started to mess around with the car and crashes it. "I thought I told you not to play with the car!" BadVibes exclaimed. Then, Bulletproof tells the young viewers "Take it from BadVibes, kids. Cars are not toys. Besides, you're not as replaceable as Buzzbomb is."
Mace: "Vandalism"Mace expresses how much he hates graffiti. He hates it because it is hard to clean it up and costs money to do so. Secondly, he hates it most of all because it is against the law. Especially when a troublesome kid sprays graffiti on Mace's uniform.
MainFrame: "Play Away from Cars"With the help of Waldo, the robot, Mainframe tells the young viewers that since they are much too small to be seen by drivers moving in their cars, they are to play away from cars so they will not get hurt by them.
MainFrame: "Traffic Safety"Two kids are playing ball. Then, the ball went into the street. Mainframe discourages one of the little kids from going out and get the ball. A car came and ran over the ball. Streets are for cars, not kids. Mainframe tells the younger viewers never to go out into the street to get the toy if it went out into it. Toys can be replaced, not kids.
Big Boss and Squeeky Kleen: "Don't Flash Your Cash"Big Boss and Squeeky Kleen at the mall shows to the viewers how one must never flash his/her cash in front of the crowd with Squeeky showing off an example of this the hard way - by getting mugged and whipped by thugs when he flashes some wad of cash in front of them. This is another of the rare instances where a villain character hosts a PSA segment.
Highway: "Bicycle Safety"Highway shows off his normal bicycle while discussing a few bicycle safety tips to the viewers. Berserko did not care. Instead, he rode down just the opposite of where one is supposed to go while bike riding down the road and crashed into a car pulling out in front of him. Highway turns around to see if Berserko is all right and says to the viewers, "Don't be Bicycling Berserko. Ride safe. Ride right."
Highway: "Don't Steal Traffic Signs"Highway tells the viewers never to steal traffic signs and shows an example of a kid showing off a large stop sign he has stolen from a street corner to a group of kids meeting inside of a clubhouse.

References

  1. ^ "C.O.P.S.: The Animated Series — DVD Review at IGN". IGN. http://uk.dvd.ign.com/articles/691/691738p1.html. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  2. ^ "COPS: The Animated Series, Volume 1". DVD Talk. http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/19742/cops-the-animated-series-4-disc-set/. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  3. ^ "POLICE REPORT ToyFare talks to the creators behind the C.O.P.S. toys and comic, and shows you never-before-seen artwork!". Wizard. Archived from the original on 2007-10-09. http://web.archive.org/web/20071009011526/http://www.wizarduniverse.com/magazine/toyfare/004165286.cfm. Retrieved 2010-03-15. 
  4. ^ "C.O.P.S. – Press for C.O.P.S. contains episode list & Extra's for Shout release". TVShowsOnDVD.com. http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/news/COPS/4773. Retrieved 2010-02-23. 
  5. ^ "COPS: The Animated Series, Volume 2". DVD Talk. http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/43067/cops-volume-2/. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  6. ^ Hal Erickson, Television Cartoon Shows: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, 1949 Through 2003, Volume 1 (McFarland & Co., 2005), 213.
  7. ^ Yo Joe: Beachhead File Card; both C.O.P.S. and G.I. Joe had File Cards made by Larry Hama.
  8. ^ Hal Erickson, Television Cartoon Shows: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, 1949 Through 2003, Volume 1 (McFarland & Co., 2005), 213.
  9. ^ "C.O.P.S. – Volume 1 Review". TVShowsOnDVD.com. http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/reviews/COPS-Volume-Release/5435. Retrieved 2010-02-23. 
  10. ^ "Shout! Factory Store". Shout! Factory Store. http://www.shoutfactorystore.com/prod.aspx?pfid=5257129. Retrieved 2012-06-23. 
  11. ^ "Site News DVD news: US Townhall.com Interview with Mill Creek VP Jeff Hayne". TVShowsOnDVD.com. 2007-05-25. http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/news/Site-News-Interview-with-Mill-Creek-VP/14528. Retrieved 2012-06-23. 
  12. ^ "C.O.P.S. DVD news: Announcement for Mill Creek's Volume 1 and The Best Of". TVShowsOnDVD.com. 2007-05-25. http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/news/COPS-Volume-1-and-The-Best-Of/14869. Retrieved 2012-06-23. 
  13. ^ "C.O.P.S. DVD news: Announcement for C.O.P.S. - Volume 2". TVShowsOnDVD.com. http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/news/COPS-Volume-2/15704. Retrieved 2012-06-23. 

External links