Cats Don't Dance

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Cats Don't Dance
Cats dont dance poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster by John Alvin
Directed byMark Dindal
Campbell Morton
Produced byBill Bloom
Timothy Campbell
Paul Gertz
David Kirschner
Screenplay byRoberts Gannaway
Cliff Ruby
Elana Lesser
Story byMark Dindal
Robert Lence
Brian McEntee
Rick Schneider-Calabash
David Womersley
Kelvin Yasuda
StarringScott Bakula
Jasmine Guy
Ashley Peldon
John Rhys-Davies
Kathy Najimy
Don Knotts
Natalie Cole
Hal Holbrook
Dee Bradley Baker
Music bySteve Goldstein (Score)
Randy Newman (Songs)
Editing byDan Molina
StudioTurner Feature Animation
Distributed byWarner Bros. Family Entertainment
(USA and Japan)
Turner Pictures Worldwide
(International)
Release dates
  • March 26, 1997 (1997-03-26)
Running time75 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$32 million[1]
Box office$3,588,602[1]
 
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Cats Don't Dance
Cats dont dance poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster by John Alvin
Directed byMark Dindal
Campbell Morton
Produced byBill Bloom
Timothy Campbell
Paul Gertz
David Kirschner
Screenplay byRoberts Gannaway
Cliff Ruby
Elana Lesser
Story byMark Dindal
Robert Lence
Brian McEntee
Rick Schneider-Calabash
David Womersley
Kelvin Yasuda
StarringScott Bakula
Jasmine Guy
Ashley Peldon
John Rhys-Davies
Kathy Najimy
Don Knotts
Natalie Cole
Hal Holbrook
Dee Bradley Baker
Music bySteve Goldstein (Score)
Randy Newman (Songs)
Editing byDan Molina
StudioTurner Feature Animation
Distributed byWarner Bros. Family Entertainment
(USA and Japan)
Turner Pictures Worldwide
(International)
Release dates
  • March 26, 1997 (1997-03-26)
Running time75 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$32 million[1]
Box office$3,588,602[1]

Cats Don't Dance is a 1997 American animated musical comedy film, distributed by Warner Bros. Family Entertainment and notable as the only fully animated feature produced by Turner Feature Animation. This studio was merged during the post-production of Cats Don't Dance into Warner Bros. Animation after the merger of Time Warner with Turner Broadcasting System in 1996. Turner Feature Animation had also produced the animated portions of Turner's The Pagemaster (1994).

Set in a world where human beings and anthropomorphic animals live side-by-side, it focuses on a cat named Danny who wants to break into show business in Hollywood. The film stars the voices of Scott Bakula and Jasmine Guy, and was the directorial debut of former Disney animator Mark Dindal, its musical numbers, written by Randy Newman, and for Gene Kelly's contributions as choreographer, after his death in 1996. The film was Kelly's final film project which is dedicated to him. Despite receiving positive reviews from critics, Cats Don't Dance failed at the box office. This was also the last film of Betty Lou Gerson before her retirement and death on January 12, 1999 from a stroke.

Plot[edit]

Set in 1939 the film opens up with the narrator John Rhys Davies telling the story with his point of view of Darla Dimple. Which Max is seen keeping her castle in order, selecting and pressed her robes for the day and preparing her royal breakfast while Max takes it up to her chambers while Darla still sleeps and snores then there's a montage of a award person giving her an A.R.F award. Then Max is seen brushing his teeth with a Darla toothbrush and Darla is seen hugging animals Then we see Danny who leaves town to go to Hollywood and we hear ("Our Time Has Come"), The film is set on Danny, an optimistic cat, dreams of becoming a film star, so he travels from Kokomo, Indiana to Hollywood, California in hopes of starting a career there ("Danny's Arrival Song"). Danny is selected to feature in a film that is currently in production alongside a female cat named Sawyer, but is dismayed upon learning how minor his role is and tries to weasel his way into more time in the limelight ("Little Boat on the Sea"). However, Danny winds up angering the star of the film, Darla Dimple, a popular, but spoiled child actress, so, she assigns her valet, Max, to intimidate Danny into no longer trying to enlarge his part in the film.

Later, Danny learns from his fellow animal film extras that human actors are normally given more important roles than animals, a fact that none of them are very happy with but know they must accept. Danny, however, longs for the spotlight and tries to come up with a plan that will encourage humans to provide animal actors with better parts, such as by assembling a massive cluster of animals and trying to put on a musical performance for the humans to see ("Animal Jam"). Later, he is given advice by Darla Dimple (while masking her true villainous personality with a sweet one, as she always does) through song on how to interest and satisfy audiences ("Big and Loud"), and Danny takes this information to heart and groups together the animals for yet another performance in hopes of attracting the attention of the humans. However, Darla, fearing that her spotlight is in jeopardy with the animals around, has Max assist her in flooding Mammoth Studios while the director is giving an interview on his latest film and getting the animals blamed and fired. Everybody is depressed by being barred from acting in Mammoth Studios (especially Danny, who was convinced by Darla that she was trying to help the animals), At Pinky's some of the animals felt bad especially Sawyer. So she sings (" Tell Me Lies") to Danny about how she can warm up to Danny. So then she tries to tell Danny she needs him but is too late and then feels bad with tears coming down her eyes. While Danny see's the animals outside ths bus window feeling bad.Danny comes up with a plan for attracting the humans' attention yet again.

On the night of the premiere of the Darla Dimple film that was being shot, "Lil' Ark Angel", after the screening, Danny calls the audience's attention and the animals put on a musical performance for everyone that entertains and impresses its viewers ("Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now"). Meanwhile, Darla attempts to sabotage and shut down the show, but finds out that everything she does inadvertently enhances it more instead. Finally, Darla, maddened with frustration, shouts at Danny for trying to attract all of the focus away from her, and confesses to flooding Mammoth Studios. Unfortunately, Darla's screaming is inadvertently picked up and amplified by a nearby microphone, unveiling the truth much to the dismay of the audience, Mr. Mammoth, and Flanigan. Embarrassed, Darla tries to regain her fame by hugging Danny (like the fan that she hugged earlier), until Pudge pulls the lever for the trap door, meeting her demise. So, the animals are rewarded with larger parts from then onward, their dreams coming true. The film then ends with a selection of film poster parodies, putting the animals in certain roles, before Darla as a janitor puts "The End" poster on a wall and it falls down on her.

Cast[edit]

Musical Numbers[edit]

  1. Opening Song: Our Time Has Come
  2. Danny's Arrival Song (Hollywood)
  3. Little Boat On The Sea
  4. Animal Jam
  5. Big and Loud
  6. Big and Loud (Reprise)
  7. Tell Me Lies
  8. Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now
  9. Our Time Has Come (Reprise)

Production[edit]

The film was launched in 1993 as a vehicle for Michael Jackson, who would produce, star, and be a consultant in the music and choreography. It would have been a hybrid live-action/CGI film.[2] The film was ultimately made without Jackson's involvement. At one point, David Shire and Richard Maltby, Jr. wrote songs for the film before Randy Newman was hired. The film was intended to be set on Broadway with less anthropomorphic animals before the plot began to evolve.[3]

Casting[edit]

At that point the core team of filmmakers was assembled and it was time to begin casting the roles. As is the tradition in animation, the voice actors are videotaped as they record the voices of their characters; this enables the animators to use specific body language from each of the actors to lend dimension to their characterizations.

Scott Bakula, best known to audiences as the star of the hit television series "Quantum Leap," was cast as Danny. Explains Paul Gertz, "People will be very surprised when they hear Danny and realize that it's Scott's voice doing all that singing. Scott had had a successful career starring on Broadway before he began working in television and film. He's a very experienced singer and dancer, and he was a natural choice for Danny."

Sawyer, Danny's verbal sparring partner and, eventually, his lady love, is voiced by Jasmine Guy, who became known to television viewers as snooty Whitley Gilbert on the hit series "A Different World." Sawyer's singing voice is provided by recording diva Natalie Cole. "There was something special about working with Natalie, who's a wonderful talent on her own, and whose father, Nat, was a part of Hollywood's fabulous past," says David Kirschner. "Somehow I think it shows up in her interpretation of the music; there is a classic charm and romance to it."

Other character voices were provided by such talents as George Kennedy, Hal Holbrook, Rene Auberjonois, John Rhys-Davies, Kathy Najimy, Betty Lou Gerson (the voice of the animated Cruella DeVil) and Don Knotts. "Many of these actors have worked in animation before, and many others have done radio drama, which has trained them in using every expressive nuance in their voices," says Kirschner. "We wanted each character to be an individual -- to sound as if they looked, moved and acted a certain way."

The scheming star Darla Dimple was voiced by nine-year-old Ashley Peldon, who has herself been acting since her toddler days and is most recently seen in the acclaimed live-action drama "The Crucible."

The voice casting of the cute penguin Pudge is its own version of the classic Hollywood story, recalls Mark Dindal. "A group of animators was eating lunch together in an outdoor cafe one day and a little boy came over to ask us for directions. Someone answered him and he walked away. At that same moment, another animator blurted, `That's Pudge exactly!,' and we all realized it was true.

"So we rushed after him and asked if he'd ever acted -- which he hadn't -- and if he'd like to -- which he would -- and the rest is moviemaking history. Little Matthew Herried became a terrific voice for Pudge."

During production, management at Turner Feature Animation changed repeatedly and each head that came in attempted to take drastic revisions, including updating the setting to the 1950s rock-and-roll era. "It's pretty hard to try and keep what you have finished so far, and then suddenly transition into a different period of time or introduce a different character or have a completely different ending that doesn't seem to fit the beginning you have," said director Mark Dindal.[3]

Dindal's portrayal of Max was initially a scratch track and was never intended to be heard on the film. Dindal wanted Max to be voiced by a professional actor, but as the film started running out of money, he kept his own vocals in.[3]

Animation[edit]

During the animation on "Cats Don't Dance," Randy Newman was creating songs that gently poked fun at the idealism of the `30s movie hopeful while capturing the melodic, danceable sound that has made so many of those songs into classics.

Production PhotoMuses Mark Dindal, "One of the things that stuck in my mind after we spoke with people who'd been part of Hollywood's Golden Age was the number of times they described an effect or stunt that they had never done before. They said, `We just DID it, and if it worked, we left it.'

"We're more analytical about film today -- we have more history to look back on, and the cost of making movies is so high that it leaves less room for experimentation. But we're still trying to push the boundaries of the possible, and some of that pioneering, risk-taking outlook is still what makes today's movies great.

"I like to think that we've kind of tipped our hats to the best of both worlds with `Cats Don't Dance' -- it's an homage to the past, but created with the talents of the present and the technology of the future. And the message -- giving everyone a chance to be his or her best by pursuing what they truly love -- is timeless."

Turner Feature Animation Presents A David Kirschner Production: "Cats Don't Dance," starring Scott Bakula and Jasmine Guy. The songs are by Randy Newman and the music is by Steve Goldstein, featuring songs performed by Natalie Cole. The art direction is by Brian McEntee; Jim Katz and Barry Weiss are the co-producers. The executive producers are David Steinberg, Charles L. Richardson and Sandy Russell Gartin. The screenplay is by Roberts Gannaway, Cliff Ruby & Elana Lesser and Theresa Pettengill. The film is produced by David Kirschner and Paul Gertz; "Cats Don't Dance" is directed by Mark Dindal and distributed by Warner Bros., A Time Warner Entertainment Company.

Release[edit]

Warner Bros. attached "Pullet Surprise", a newly produced Looney Tunes short featuring Foghorn Leghorn, to the original theatrical release, and "The Big Sister", a Dexter's Laboratory What-A-Cartoon! short, following the film in its original home video release.

Critical reception[edit]

Cats Don't Dance was released to mixed to positive reviews (it has a 69% 'fresh' rating on Rotten Tomatoes)[4] and became a casualty of the Turner/Time Warner merger: it received a traditional theatrical release in 1997 but without fanfare and did not draw an audience, perhaps due to minimal advertising, a lack of promotional merchandise (only two book adaptations and a set of toys from Subway) and having only one theatrical trailer prepared. Director Mark Dindal was angry with Warner over the lack of advertising and the failed marketing campaign.[3]

Box office[edit]

The film's total domestic theatrical gross was $3,566,637,[1] making it a box office bomb in contrast with its $32 million production budget.[1] Despite being a commercial failure, Cats Don't Dance was the first non-Disney animated film to have won the Best Animated Feature award at the 1997 Annie Awards.

Home media[edit]

Cats Don't Dance got its first home video release on VHS and Laserdisc on August 19, 1997 by Warner Home Video. While a standard 4:3 VHS, the Laserdisc was special in the fact that it remains to this day the only home video release of the film in its theatrical widescreen format in North America (the film is available on DVD in widescreen in Europe). The Laserdisc was never re-released and has become very rare. The VHS re-released for its second and final time on March 2, 1999. Home media sales improved more than its box office.

The film saw its first DVD releases on August 19, 1997 and September 2, 2002, as a 4:3 pan-and-scan DVD with bonus features. The most recent release was a re-release of the same DVD, but bundled with Quest for Camelot, which was released on May 2, 2006. In July 2008, Cats Don't Dance was released on DVD in widescreen in Germany, Spain, and the Benelux countries (Belgium/the Netherlands/Luxembourg).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Cats Don't Dance". The Numbers. Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  2. ^ Michael hard at work on 'Cats Don't Dance'. Reading Eagle (June 15, 1993)
  3. ^ a b c d Strike, Joe (November 2000)Mark Dindal's Place in the Sun. Animation World Magazine (Issue 5.8).
  4. ^ Cats Don't Dance at Rotten Tomatoes

External links[edit]