Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception (Peoria, Illinois)

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Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception
Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception (Peoria, Illinois) is located in Peoria County
Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception (Peoria, Illinois)
40°41′54.9″N 89°35′6.1″W / 40.698583°N 89.585028°W / 40.698583; -89.585028Coordinates: 40°41′54.9″N 89°35′6.1″W / 40.698583°N 89.585028°W / 40.698583; -89.585028
Location607 NE Madison Ave.
Peoria, Illinois
CountryUnited States
DenominationCatholic Church
Websitehttp://www.cdop.org/Cathedral
History
Founded1846
Architecture
StatusCathedral
Functional statusActive
Architect(s)Casper Mehler
StyleGothic Revival
Groundbreaking1885
Completed1889
Specifications
Length170 feet (52 m)[1]
Width80 feet (24 m)
Number of spiresTwo
Spire height230 feet (70 m)
MaterialsLimestone
Administration
DiocesePeoria
Clergy
Bishop(s)Most Rev. Daniel R. Jenky, C.S.C.
RectorMsgr. Stanley L. Deptula
Governing bodyPrivate
Part ofNorth Side Historic District (#83003588[2])
Added to NRHPNovember 21, 1983
 
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Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception
Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception (Peoria, Illinois) is located in Peoria County
Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception (Peoria, Illinois)
40°41′54.9″N 89°35′6.1″W / 40.698583°N 89.585028°W / 40.698583; -89.585028Coordinates: 40°41′54.9″N 89°35′6.1″W / 40.698583°N 89.585028°W / 40.698583; -89.585028
Location607 NE Madison Ave.
Peoria, Illinois
CountryUnited States
DenominationCatholic Church
Websitehttp://www.cdop.org/Cathedral
History
Founded1846
Architecture
StatusCathedral
Functional statusActive
Architect(s)Casper Mehler
StyleGothic Revival
Groundbreaking1885
Completed1889
Specifications
Length170 feet (52 m)[1]
Width80 feet (24 m)
Number of spiresTwo
Spire height230 feet (70 m)
MaterialsLimestone
Administration
DiocesePeoria
Clergy
Bishop(s)Most Rev. Daniel R. Jenky, C.S.C.
RectorMsgr. Stanley L. Deptula
Governing bodyPrivate
Part ofNorth Side Historic District (#83003588[2])
Added to NRHPNovember 21, 1983

The Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception (commonly known as St. Mary's Cathedral) is a cathedral of the Catholic Church located in Peoria, Illinois, United States. It is the seat of the Diocese of Peoria, where the renowned Catholic televangelist and sainthood candidate, Archbishop Fulton Sheen, was born and raised. The cathedral is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing property in the North Side Historic District.

History[edit]

St. Mary's Rectory

The first Mass in the vicinity of Peoria was celebrated at Fort Crevecoeur, across the Illinois River from the present city. The Récollets stationed at the fort included the Revs. Gabriel Ribourde, Zenobius Membre and Louis Hennepin. Father Reho celebrated Mass in the city of Peoria in 1839 and the Rev. John A. Drew built the first St. Mary's Church in 1846.[3]

Chicago architect Casper Mehler designed the present cathedral to reflect the style of St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York.[4] The cornerstone was laid on June 28, 1885 by Bishop John Lancaster Spalding. Construction on the cathedral was completed in 1889. The present pipe organ, Wicks Organ Company, opus 1503, was installed in 1936.[5] It features 3,329 pipes.[1]

The cathedral church and the neighboring Bishop's House, now used for other purposes, are among the contributing properties in the North Side Historic District added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

Blessed Mother Teresa visited St. Mary's for a mass in her honor in 1995.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "St. Mary's Cathedral". Emporis. Retrieved 2014-04-16. 
  2. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  3. ^ Shannon, James. "Peoria". New Advent. Retrieved 2014-04-16. 
  4. ^ "Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception". Chicago Architecture. Retrieved 2014-04-16. 
  5. ^ "Wicks Organ Co., Opus 1503, 1936". Organ Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-04-16. 

External links[edit]