Carrie Grant

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Carrie Grant
Carrie Grant.jpg
Carrie Grant at the 2008 Red Bull Flugtag
BornCaroline Vanessa Gray
(1965-08-17) 17 August 1965 (age 48)
Enfield, England, UK
Occupationvocal coach, singer, TV presenter
Spouse(s)David Grant
ChildrenOlivia, Talia, Imogen
 
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Carrie Grant
Carrie Grant.jpg
Carrie Grant at the 2008 Red Bull Flugtag
BornCaroline Vanessa Gray
(1965-08-17) 17 August 1965 (age 48)
Enfield, England, UK
Occupationvocal coach, singer, TV presenter
Spouse(s)David Grant
ChildrenOlivia, Talia, Imogen

Carrie Grant (born Caroline Vanessa Gray, 17 August 1965) is a British vocal coach,[1] television presenter and session singer. She is best known for her work on the television talent contests Fame Academy,[2] Comic Relief Does Fame Academy and Pop Idol, together with her husband and colleague David Grant.[3] She is also personal voice coach to many successful pop stars. She first came to fame as a singer in her own right with the pop group Sweet Dreams in 1983, when they represented the United Kingdom at the Eurovision Song Contest that year with the song I'm Never Giving Up.[4]

Since 2010 she has been a regular reporter on BBC One's magazine programme The One Show.

In 2012, she appeared on the ITV documentary, The Talent Show Story where she spoke about her time as a judge and coach. Other talent show judges interviewed included Simon Cowell, Dannii Minogue, Kelly Rowland, Neil Fox, Nicky Chapman, Amanda Holden, Gary Barlow, Piers Morgan, Pete Waterman, Tulisa Contostavlos and Louis Walsh.

Personal life[edit]

She and husband David have three daughters: Olivia, Talia and Imogen. Olivia played Alice in the fifth series of The Story of Tracy Beaker and went on to a small role in EastEnders. She then went on to play the part of Mia Stone in the CBBC show Half Moon Investigations.

Grant has suffered from Crohn's disease since the age of 18 [5] and has been praised by science education charity Sense About Science for her efforts in raising the profile of the disease without making any scientifically unsound claims about available therapies.[6] She is a supporter of the Labour Party and addressed its conference in 2012, about why she valued the NHS.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Secrets of singing revealed". Telegraph. 2007-06-19. Retrieved 2010-11-08. 
  2. ^ "They've got the X Factor". Guardian. 2009-12-03. Retrieved 2010-11-08. 
  3. ^ Kinnear, Lucy (18 February 2008). "The 5-minute Interview: Carrie Grant, vocal coach and session singer". The Independent. Retrieved 28 January 2010. 
  4. ^ "Talking Shop: Carrie Grant". BBC. 2008-05-21. Retrieved 2010-11-08. 
  5. ^ "'My life with Crohn's disease'". National Health Service. 2010-08-28. 
  6. ^ "Celebrities and Science Review 2008". Sense About Science. Retrieved 2010-11-08. 

External links[edit]