Carl Jackson

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Carl Jackson
Born(1953-09-18) September 18, 1953 (age 61)
OriginLouisville, Mississippi, USA
GenresBluegrass
Country
Occupation(s)Singer-songwriter
Musician
Producer
InstrumentsBanjo
Guitar
Mandolin
Vocals
Years active197x-present
LabelsCapitol
Sugar Hill
Columbia
Universal South Records
Rounder Records
Vanguard
Shell Point Records
Associated actsJerry Salley, Larry Cordle
Websitehttp://www.carljackson.net
 
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This article is about the musician. For the golf caddie, see Carl Jackson (caddie). For the American producer and director, see Carl Jackson (filmmaker).
Carl Jackson
Born(1953-09-18) September 18, 1953 (age 61)
OriginLouisville, Mississippi, USA
GenresBluegrass
Country
Occupation(s)Singer-songwriter
Musician
Producer
InstrumentsBanjo
Guitar
Mandolin
Vocals
Years active197x-present
LabelsCapitol
Sugar Hill
Columbia
Universal South Records
Rounder Records
Vanguard
Shell Point Records
Associated actsJerry Salley, Larry Cordle
Websitehttp://www.carljackson.net

Carl Eugene Jackson (born September 18, 1953 in Louisville, Mississippi[1]) is an American country and bluegrass musician. Jackson's first Grammy was awarded in 1992 for his duet album with John Starling titled "Spring Training." In 2003 Jackson produced the Grammy Award-winning CD titled Livin', Lovin', Losin': Songs of the Louvin Brothers - a tribute to Ira and Charlie Louvin. He also recorded one of the songs on the CD, a collection of duets featuring such artists as James Taylor, Alison Krauss, Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash, Emmylou Harris, and others.

Biography[edit]

Carl Jackson's musical career began in childhood. At the age of 14 he was invited to play banjo for Jim and Jesse and the Virginia Boys, one of the most respected bluegrass bands at that time. After five years with Jim and Jesse, Jackson tested the musical waters elsewhere before landing a job with Glen Campbell. Jackson remained in Campbell's band for 12 years.[2]

Jackson continued to work in Nashville as a songwriter and musician. Between 1984 and 1985, he charted three singles on the Billboard country music charts, including the No. 44 hit "She's Gone, Gone, Gone".[1] Jackson was also named Bluegrass music's MVP in 2006. He also earned the International Bluegrass Music Association's Song of the Year award in 1990 for "Little Mountain Church House", which was recorded by Ricky Skaggs and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

Jackson has written songs performed by Glen Campbell ("Letter To Home"), Garth Brooks ("Against the Grain", "Fit for a King"), Alecia Nugent ("Breaking New Ground"), Terri Clark ("Hold Your Horses"), and Rhonda Vincent ("I'm Not Over You"), among others.

Jackson's "Lonesome Dove" was recorded by co-writer Larry Cordle and Lonesome Standard Time, Ricky Skaggs, Trisha Yearwood, and Tim Hensley, in addition to his own rendition on the album with John Starling, "Spring Training", which featured Emmylou Harris and her Nash Ramblers band. The CD was released in 1991. Jackson received a Grammy award that year for "Spring Training". In 2003, he was awarded another Grammy for producing Livin', Lovin', Losin': Songs of the Louvin Brothers.

In 2010-11 Jackson produced Mark Twain: Words & Music[3] as a benefit for the Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum in Hannibal, Missouri. The double-CD tells Twain's life in spoken-word and song and features Jimmy Buffett as Huckleberry Finn, Garrison Keillor as narrator, and Clint Eastwood as Twain. Singers include Brad Paisley, Emmylou Harris, Vince Gill, Rhonda Vincent, Ricky Skaggs, Sheryl Crow, and more. Also in 2011, Jackson was honored by the Mississippi Humanities Council for his musical legacy. Jackson was furthered honored by his home state of Mississippi with the installation of a Country Music Trail Marker located at 143 South Church in his hometown of Louisville.[4]

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Singles[edit]

YearSingleUS Country
1984"She's Gone, Gone, Gone"44
1985"All That's Left for Me"70
"Dixie Train"45
1986"You Are the Rock (And I'm a Rolling Stone)"85

Awards[edit]

Grammy Awards[5][edit]

IBMA (International Bluegrass Music Association) Awards[6][edit]

References[edit]