Cardinal Dougherty High School

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Cardinal Dougherty High School
Address
6301 North 2nd Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19120
USA
Coordinates40°2′49″N 75°7′19″W / 40.04694°N 75.12194°W / 40.04694; -75.12194Coordinates: 40°2′49″N 75°7′19″W / 40.04694°N 75.12194°W / 40.04694; -75.12194
Information
TypePrivate, Co-Educational
MottoCrucis In Signo Vinces
(Conquer in the Sign of the Cross)
Religious affiliation(s)Roman Catholic
Established1956
PresidentCarl F. Janicki
PrincipalThomas F. Rooney, Jr.
Asst. PrincipalMary McDonald
Diana Graeber
Faculty41
Grades9-12
Enrollment784 [1] (2008)
Grade 9177
Grade 10206
Grade 11196
Grade 12205
CampusRural/Urban
Color(s)Garnet and Gold         
MascotCardinal (Bird)
AccreditationMiddle States Association of Colleges and Schools[2]
NewspaperPrelate
YearbookEminence
Alumni40,000+
Athletic DirectorSteve Carr
 
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Cardinal Dougherty High School
Address
6301 North 2nd Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19120
USA
Coordinates40°2′49″N 75°7′19″W / 40.04694°N 75.12194°W / 40.04694; -75.12194Coordinates: 40°2′49″N 75°7′19″W / 40.04694°N 75.12194°W / 40.04694; -75.12194
Information
TypePrivate, Co-Educational
MottoCrucis In Signo Vinces
(Conquer in the Sign of the Cross)
Religious affiliation(s)Roman Catholic
Established1956
PresidentCarl F. Janicki
PrincipalThomas F. Rooney, Jr.
Asst. PrincipalMary McDonald
Diana Graeber
Faculty41
Grades9-12
Enrollment784 [1] (2008)
Grade 9177
Grade 10206
Grade 11196
Grade 12205
CampusRural/Urban
Color(s)Garnet and Gold         
MascotCardinal (Bird)
AccreditationMiddle States Association of Colleges and Schools[2]
NewspaperPrelate
YearbookEminence
Alumni40,000+
Athletic DirectorSteve Carr

Cardinal Dougherty High School (CDHS) was a private, Roman Catholic high school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was located in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia and founded as a co-institutional school. In 1983, CDHS became co-educational - with boys and girls being educated together in the same classrooms.

Archbishop O'Hara purchased the grounds upon which Cardinal Dougherty High School was situated from Charles Henry Fisher in 1940. Fifteen years later, the Archbishop's dream of a prestigious high school for Roman Catholics became a reality. The land was blessed by Auxiliary Bishop J. Carroll McCormick and ground was broken on June 28, 1955. School was opened to freshman and sophomores on September 5, 1956, and the cornerstone was laid on October 25, 1956.

Each subsequent year added one more class of students until 1959 when the first class of seniors graduated from CDHS. The high school was named after the former Archbishop of Philadelphia, Cardinal Dennis Joseph Dougherty, because of his years of dedicated service and administration from 1918 to 1951. Monsignor Adolph Baum was appointed as the school's first principal. Cardinal Dougherty, after whom the school was named, was featured on the cover of Time Magazine on February 15, 1937.

On October 8, 2009, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced that Cardinal Dougherty High School would close at the end of the 2009-2010 academic year. The ringing of the final bell ended the institution's history of educating the Philadelphia area's youth.

Background[edit]

Cardinal Dougherty High School was established in the Olney section of Philadelphia at 6301 North Second Street. CDHS soon became the largest Catholic high school in the world with a student enrollment surpassing 6,000 in October 1965. There were more than 1,200 graduates in the class of 1968 alone, and the school has over 40,000 alumni world-wide.

Because of the marked decline in enrollment, exorbitant increases in the tuition rate were made to help cover the institution's operating expenses. In the mid to late 1960's, tuition ranged from $100 to $200 - with half of the tuition being paid by each student's home parish. At closing, CDHS' tuition exceeded $6,000 per annum.

Athletics[edit]

The school fielded teams in the following: baseball, football, cross country, soccer, tennis, bowling, field hockey, wrestling, indoor track, basketball, cheerleading, softball, lacrosse, swimming, outdoor track and field, and golf.

Activities[edit]

In its many years of existence, the offering of student activities at Cardinal Dougherty High School changed with the times. CDHS sponsored activities that were as diverse as its student body, with participants exemplifying the school's spirit of excellence through scholarship, good character, leadership, and service to the larger community.

CDHS' activities included, but are not limited to: the Glee Club, the Stamp Club, a faculty choir, the Camera Club, Mathletes, the National Honor Society, Student Council, the Mock Trial Team, the Marching Unit, the Jazz Band, the Orchestra, the Stage Crew, the Make-Up Crew, scripted stage productions and plays like "Joseph and His Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" and "P.T. Barnum", Follies (spring musical), the Chorus, Suicide Prevention, the German Club, the French Club, the Spanish Club, Golden Touch, Respect Life, Shalom, the Community Service Corps, Library Assistants, the Lector Society, Students Against Driving Drunk, Activities Aides, Altar Servers, the Prelate (newspaper), and Eminence (yearbook).

Along with the athletic program, great "pride also stemmed from Dougherty's renowned marching band. In its heyday, about 200 students participated in the band, color guard and drill team - an ensemble so popular that it recorded albums each year. CDHS performed for Pope Paul VI at the Vatican, President Lyndon Johnson's 1965 inauguration and for Princess Grace of Monaco - a Philadelphia native. The band played at NFL games - including the 1962 championship - and won a world competition in The Netherlands in 1966."[3]

In addition, CDHS sponsored organized, annual events that were open to the entire student body for participation These are: the Homecoming Court, the Homecoming game complete with a parade, the Homecoming Dance, the Christmas Dance, Mother-Daughter Night, Father-Daughter Night, the Freshman Dance, the Soph Hop, the Junior Prom, and the Senior Prom.

Notable alumni[edit]

1960

1961

1965

1966

1968

1973

1974

1979

1980

1992

2004

Notable administrators and faculty[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

External links[edit]