Caillou

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Caillou
Caillou logo
GenreChildren's television series
FormatAnimated series
Created by
Country of originCanada
Original language(s)
  • French
  • English
No. of seasons5
No. of episodes92 (List of episodes)
Broadcast
Original channel
Original runSeptember 15, 1997 (1997-09-15) – October 3, 2010 (2010-10-03)
External links
Website
Production website
 
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Caillou
Caillou logo
GenreChildren's television series
FormatAnimated series
Created by
Country of originCanada
Original language(s)
  • French
  • English
No. of seasons5
No. of episodes92 (List of episodes)
Broadcast
Original channel
Original runSeptember 15, 1997 (1997-09-15) – October 3, 2010 (2010-10-03)
External links
Website
Production website

Caillou (pronunciation: /ˈkj/) is an educational Canadian children's television series, based on the books by author Christine L'Heureux and illustrator Hélène Desputeaux. During the first season, many of the stories in the animated version began with a grandmother (who is also the show's narrator) introducing the story to her grandchildren, then reading the story about the book. Since 1997, the narrator/grandmother is an unseen character. Caillou first aired on Télétoon on September 15, 1997, and was the first show aired on Canada's English-language Teletoon channel when it launched on October 17, 1997;[1] it later made its United States debut in English on Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) Public television on September 4, 2000. The show also began airing on Treehouse TV on September 7, 2009.[2] A fifth season came out in 2010 and it airs on PBS Kids. Caillou also airs on PBS Sprout. It has also been shown on Cartoonito since 2007.

Episodes[edit]

Caillou consists of 5 seasons[3] of 92 half-hour episodes.[4]

Caillou series overview
SeasonsEpisodesOriginal airdates
PremiereFinale
117September 15, 1997[1]July 5, 2000
216[5]September 4, 2000July 2, 2002
313[6]November 15, 2002October 7, 2005
420[7]April 3, 2005September 23, 2006
526[3]September 11, 2010[8]October 3, 2010

Plot[edit]

Based on the books by Christine L'Heureux, the show centres on a 4-year-old named Caillou who is fascinated by the world around him. He has many adventures with his family and friends and uses his imagination in every episode. Caillou lives in a blue house on 17 Pine Street (as mentioned in the episode "Where I Live") with his mommy, his daddy, and his 2-year-old sister, Rosie. Each episode in Seasons 1-3 has a theme and is divided into several short sections that mix animation, puppet skits, and video of kids in real-life situations. In Seasons 4-5, episodes are divided in 3 short sections; the puppet segment was dropped, along with the "Real Kids" version of the segment.

Characters[edit]

Production[edit]

The series was originally broadcast in French in Canada, and the episodes were later translated into English, and re-runs in English began on PBS and PBS Kids Sprout in the United States. The original books were also in French.[9] Caillou was designed primarily for toddlers aged between 2–6 years old. It was created by child developmental psychologists.

Caillou books have been made since 1987 by Chouette Publishing Inc. In 1997, 65 5-minute episodes of Caillou were aired in Canada and in selected markets worldwide, including the U.S., as mentioned above. In 2000 there were 40 30-minute episodes of the show, containing a mixture of the 5-minute episodes plus new stories, songs, real kids segment and puppets. This was followed by another 16 30-minute episodes containing all-new stories in 2003. The film Caillou's Holiday Movie was released on October 7, 2003.

On April 3, 2005, a new set of 20 episodes finally premiered after a three-year hiatus. Caillou started attending preschool and there were new themes and a new opening. While the original episodes were made by a South Korean company, the producers animated the new episodes in-house using Adobe Flash. On November 14, 2012, PBS Kids announced a 4th season of Caillou of 26 episodes to premiere March 11, 2013.[10][11]

Reception[edit]

A number of parents questioned why the title character, Caillou, is bald, sparking rumours about the reason. The official website for PBS Kids laid such ideas to rest by publishing a FAQ answering common questions regarding Caillou, explaining that the character appeared as a much younger child in the original line of children's books.[12]

A 2011 study conducted at the University of Virginia, published in the journal Pediatrics, tested the show's effect on preschool-aged children's attention spans and cognitive abilities. The study had three groups of four year-olds each engaged in activities; one group watched Caillou, another watched SpongeBob SquarePants, and the third group drew pictures. After nine minutes, the children were tested on mental functions; those that watched Caillou had very similar results to the group that drew pictures, both of whom performed significantly better than the group that watched the SpongeBob episode.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "CORPORATION CINAR CÉLÈBRE LE 5e ANNIVERSAIRE DE CAILLOU À LA TÉLÉVISION" (PDF). Archived from the original on 2003-03-14. Retrieved 2013-12-22. 
  2. ^ "For the Kid Inside!". The Cookie Jar Company. 2009-08-20. Retrieved 2013-12-22. 
  3. ^ a b "Animation Portfolio: CAILLOU • Sea Monster". Seamonster.co.za. Retrieved 2013-12-22. 
  4. ^ "DHX Media - Distribution - Caillou - Catalogue - Pre-School". Distribution.dhxmedia.com. Retrieved 2013-12-22. 
  5. ^ "Come Learn With Caillou! - Free Online Library". Thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 2013-12-22. 
  6. ^ "Caillou . Parents & Teachers . Episodes Descriptions . Season 3". Caillou.com. Retrieved 2014-02-08. 
  7. ^ "New Caillou" (PDF). Archived from the original on 2007-01-14. Retrieved 2013-12-22. 
  8. ^ "For the Kid Inside!". The Cookie Jar Company. 2010-09-08. Retrieved 2013-12-22. 
  9. ^ "Chouette Publishing". 
  10. ^ "DHX Media sells fourth season of Cailou to PBS Kids". KidScreen. 
  11. ^ "KET". 
  12. ^ Public Broadcasting Service. "FAQ". Caillou. 
  13. ^ Lillard, Angeline and Jennifer Peterson (2011). "The Immediate Impact of Different Types of Television on Young Children's Executive Function". Pediatrics. Retrieved September 12, 2011. "peds.2010-1919; published ahead of print; doi:10.1542/peds.2010-1919" 

External links[edit]

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