CBS News

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CBS News
CBS News logo.svg
Division of:CBS Broadcasting
Key people:Leslie Moonves,
President & CEO
CBS
Jeff Fager,
Chairman of CBS News
Scott Pelley,
Lead Anchor
Founded:September 18, 1927
Headquarters:CBS Broadcast Center
Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Broadcast programs:CBS Evening News
CBS This Morning
48 Hours
60 Minutes
Sunday Morning
Face the Nation
Parent:CBS Broadcasting Inc.
Website:www.cbsnews.com
 
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CBS News
CBS News logo.svg
Division of:CBS Broadcasting
Key people:Leslie Moonves,
President & CEO
CBS
Jeff Fager,
Chairman of CBS News
Scott Pelley,
Lead Anchor
Founded:September 18, 1927
Headquarters:CBS Broadcast Center
Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Broadcast programs:CBS Evening News
CBS This Morning
48 Hours
60 Minutes
Sunday Morning
Face the Nation
Parent:CBS Broadcasting Inc.
Website:www.cbsnews.com

CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. The current chairman is Jeff Fager, who is also the executive producer of 60 Minutes; while the current president of CBS News is David Rhodes.[1] CBS News' flagship program is the CBS Evening News, hosted by the network's main anchor, Scott Pelley. Other programs include the morning news show CBS This Morning, news magazine programs CBS News Sunday Morning, 60 Minutes and 48 Hours, and Sunday morning political affairs program Face the Nation.

History[edit]

Beginnings[edit]

Upon becoming commercial station WCBW (channel 2, now WCBS-TV) in 1941, the pioneer, CBS station in New York City broadcast two daily news programs, at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. weekdays, anchored by Richard Hubbell. Most of the newscasts featured Hubbell reading a script with only occasional cutaways to a map or still photograph. When Pearl Harbor was bombed on December 7, 1941, WCBW (which was usually off the air on Sunday to give the engineers a day off), took to the air at 8:45 p.m. with an extensive special report. The national emergency even broke down the unspoken wall between CBS radio and television. WCBW executives convinced radio announcers and experts such as George Fielding Elliot and Linton Wells to come down to the Grand Central studios during the evening and give information and commentary on the attack. The WCBW special report that night lasted less than 90 minutes. But that special broadcast pushed the limits of live television in 1941 and opened up new possibilities for future broadcasts. As CBS wrote in a special report to the FCC, the unscheduled live news broadcast on December 7 “was unquestionably the most stimulating challenge and marked the greatest advance of any single problem faced up to that time.”

Additional newscasts were scheduled in the early days of the war. In May 1942, WCBW (like almost all television stations) sharply cut back its live program schedule and the newscasts were canceled, since the station temporarily suspended studio operations, resorting exclusively to the occasional broadcast of films. This was primarily due to the fact that much of the staff had either joined the service or were redeployed to war related technical research, and to prolong the life of the early, unstable cameras which were now impossible to repair due to the wartime lack of parts.

Douglas Edwards on the CBS news set in 1952.

In May 1944, as the war began to turn in favor of the Allies, WCBW reopened the studios and the newscasts returned, briefly anchored by Ned Calmer, and then by Everett Holles.[2] After the war, expanded news programs appeared on the WCBW schedule – whose call letters were changed to WCBS-TV in 1946 – first anchored by Milo Boulton, and later by Douglas Edwards. On May 3, 1948, Edwards began anchoring CBS Television News, a regular 15-minute nightly newscast on the CBS television network, including WCBS-TV. It aired every weeknight at 7:30 p.m., and was the first regularly scheduled, network television news program featuring an anchor (the nightly Lowell Thomas NBC radio network newscast was simulcast on television locally on NBC's WNBT—now WNBC—for a time in the early 1940s and the previously mentioned Richard Hubbell, Ned Calmer, Everett Holles and Milo Boulton on WCBW in the early and mid-1940s, but these were local television broadcasts seen only in New York City). NBC's offering at the time, NBC Television Newsreel (which premiered in February 1948), was simply film footage with voice narration.

In 1950, the name of the nightly newscast was changed to Douglas Edwards with the News, and the following year, it became the first news program to be broadcast on both coasts, thanks to a new coaxial cable connection, prompting Edwards to use the greeting "Good evening everyone, coast to coast." The broadcast was renamed the CBS Evening News when Walter Cronkite replaced Edwards in 1962.[3] Edwards remained with CBS News with various daytime television newscasts and radio news broadcasts until his retirement on April 1, 1988.

Broadcast history[edit]

The information on programs listed in this section came directly from CBS News in interviews with the Vice President of Communications and NewsWatch Dallas.

According to the CBS News Library and source Sandy Genelius (Vice President, CBS News Communications), the "CBS Evening News" was the program title for both Saturday and Sunday evening broadcasts. The program title for the Sunday late night news beginning in 1963 was the "CBS Sunday Night News". These titles were also seen on the intro slide of the program's opening.

text
CBS News Bulletin.

Current CBS News broadcasts[edit]

CBS News logo.

Five-minute news program history[edit]

Saturday afternoon/evening network news history (15- and 30-minute programs)[edit]

Sunday late afternoon/early evening news history[edit]

CBS Sunday late news history (all 15–minute programs)[edit]

Prime time/evening news program history[edit]

Morning news program history[edit]

Weekdays

Saturdays

Sundays

Late Night/Early Morning Program History[edit]

CBS Newspath[edit]

CBS Newspath is CBS News' satellite news-gathering service (similar to CNN Newsource). Newspath provides national hard news, sports highlights, regional spot news, features and live coverage of major breaking news events for affiliate stations to use in their local news broadcasts. The service has a team of domestic and global correspondents and freelance reporters dedicated to reporting for affiliates, and offers several different national or international stories fronted by reporters on a daily basis. CBS Newspath also relies heavily on local affiliates sharing content. Stations will often contribute locally-obtained footage that may be of national interest. It replaced a similar service, CBS News NewsNet.

Network News Service (NNS) is a pioneering news organization formed by ABC NewsOne, CBS Newspath and Fox NewsEdge. Launched in June 2000, its subscriber list already includes more than 500 ABC, CBS and Fox affiliates throughout the United States. The three news distributors created NNS to cost-effectively pool resources for developing and delivering second tier news stories and b-roll footage. The goal was to realize cost savings in the creation and distribution of these news images, while news organizations and member television stations continued to independently develop and deliver their own signature coverage of top news stories.

CBS Radio News[edit]

The branch of CBS News that produces newscasts and features to radio stations is CBS Radio News, which airs on the CBS Radio Network. The radio network is the oldest unit of CBS and traced its roots to the company's founding in 1927, and the news division took shape over the following 10 years. The list of CBS News correspondents (below) includes those reporting on CBS Radio News.

CBS Radio News produces the oldest daily news show on radio or television, the CBS World News Roundup, which first aired in 1938 and celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2013. The World News Roundup airs twice every weekday: a morning edition is anchored by Steve Kathan and produced by Paul Farry, while a “late edition” is anchored by Bill Whitney and produced by Greg Armstrong. The evening Roundup, previously known as The World Tonight, has aired in its current form since 1956 and has been anchored by Blair Clark, Douglas Edwards, Dallas Townsend and Christopher Glenn (Glenn also anchored the morning Roundup before his death in 2006).

The CBS Radio Network provides newscasts at the top of the hour, regular updates at :31 minutes past the hour, the popular Newsfeeds for affiliates (including WCBS and KYW) at :35 minutes past the hour, and breaking news updates when developments warrant, often at :20 and :50 minutes past the hour. Westwood One handles the distribution.

Slogans[edit]

Bureaus and offices[edit]

Domestic bureaus[edit]

Foreign bureaus[edit]

Personnel[edit]

Current correspondents[edit]

New York World Headquarters

Washington, D.C.

Los Angeles

London

Chicago

San Francisco

Atlanta

Dallas

Denver

Beijing

Rome

Istanbul

Contributors

CBS Newspath

New York
Washington
Los Angeles

CBS Radio News

  • Howard Arenstein - Washington, D.C. correspondent/bureau manager
  • Barry Bagnato - Washington, D.C. correspondent
  • Vicki Barker - London correspondent
  • Dave Barrett - New York correspondent
  • Heather Bosch - New York correspondent
  • Robert Berger - Jerusalem correspondent
  • Harley Carnes - New York anchor
  • Jim Chenevey - New York correspondent
  • Pam Coulter - Washington, D.C. correspondent
  • Tom Foty - Washington, D.C. anchor
  • Bob Fuss - Capitol Hill correspondent (based in Washington, D.C.)
  • Steve Futterman - Los Angeles correspondent
  • Steve Kathan - CBS World News Roundup anchor (based in New York)
  • Stephan Kaufman - correspondent in Spokane
  • Peter King - Kennedy Space Center correspondent (based in Orlando)
  • Mark Knoller - White House correspondent in Washington, D.C.
  • Jim Krasula - Carolinas correspondent
  • Sam Litzinger - Washington, D.C. anchor
  • Peter Maer - White House correspondent in Washington, D.C.
  • Cami McCormick - Washington, D.C. correspondent
  • Sharon Mittelman - New York anchor
  • Gary Nunn - New York anchor
  • Dan Raviv - Washington, D.C. national correspondent
  • Frank Settipani - New York anchor/correspondent
  • Jim Taylor - New York anchor
  • Toula Vlahou - Dubai correspondent (freelance)
  • Bill Whitney - New York anchor

Source: CBS News and NewsWatch Dallas

Past correspondents[edit]

Tony Guida

+ - deceased

Source: CBS News & NewsWatch Dallas

Presidents of CBS News[edit]

International broadcasts[edit]

CBS Evening News is shown on Sky News to viewers in Europe and Africa. In Australia, the CBS Evening News is shown at 11.30 a.m. Monday to Saturday, and at 12.30 p.m. on Sundays on Sky News Australia.

In the Philippines, CBS Evening News is broadcast via satellite on Q11 (a sister station of GMA Network) at 7:30 p.m. and replays at 1:00 p.m. after Balitanghali. CBS Evening News broadcasts were stopped on Q11 to make way for a public affairs look-back program (Napa-Strip or Power Review). currently, 60 Minutes is broadcast on the Solar News Channel (formerly Talktv) as part of their Solar News Channel Presents:Stories block, which including documentaries from the BBC or National Geographic and is broadcast on Wednesday at 8:00 p.m. before Solar Nightly News with replays on Mondays and Thursdays at 4:00 p.m. and Sundays at 5:00 p.m..

CBS is not shown outside the Americas on a channel in its own right. However, CBS News programming is shown for a few hours a day on Orbit News in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. CBS News stories are a common occurrence on Australia's Ten News on Network Ten, as part a CBS programming content deal. They also air CBS This Morning each weekday as well.

Controversies[edit]

Political bias[edit]

Throughout the years, numerous conservative activists have accused CBS News of perpetuating a liberal bias in its news coverage. The Media Research Center, a media watchdog group led by L. Brent Bozell, has been especially critical about what it has perceived to be unduly favorable coverage of liberal topics by CBS, especially during the tenure of CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather.[5][6]

In his 2001 book Bias: A CBS Insider Exposes How the Media Distort the News, former CBS correspondent Bernard Goldberg extensively criticized Rather's management of CBS News and what he claimed was Rather's combatative efforts to skew the network's coverage.[7]

On March 9, 1954, CBS' Edward R. Murrow, Fred W. Friendly, and their news team produced a half-hour See It Now special entitled "A Report on Senator Joseph McCarthy".[8] Murrow used excerpts from McCarthy's own speeches and proclamations to criticize the senator and point out episodes where he had contradicted himself. It provoked tens of thousands of letters, telegrams, and phone calls to CBS headquarters, running 15 to 1 in favor, although there were a considerable amount of comments which accused Murrow and CBS of "siding with the Communists".[9]

In 2013, 60 Minutes aired a controversial interview with a security officer who claimed that he had witnessed the terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, which resulted in the deaths of four Americans. It was later revealed that the witness had admitted that he was nowhere near the scene of the attack. CBS came under intense criticism for failing to perform due diligence to verify that the alleged witness had indeed been there.[10] A former producer for 60 Minutes suggested that the 60 Minutes staff "appear to have done that story to appeal specifically to a politically conservative audience that is obsessed with Benghazi and believes that Benghazi was much more than a tragedy." [11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CBS News Bios". CBS News. Retrieved May 1, 2013. 
  2. ^ Everett Holles 1944 WCBW Newscast
  3. ^ "The Origins Of Television News In America" by Mike Conway. Chapter: "The Birth of CBS-TV News: Columbia's Ambitious Experiment at the Advent of U.S. Commercial Television". (Peter Lang Publishing, New York NY).
  4. ^ ’48 Hours’ Kicks Off Its 25th Full Season With a Fresh New Line-Up of Crime and Justice Stories that Make a Difference - Ratings | TVbytheNumbers
  5. ^ 20 Years On the CBS Evening News: Dan Rather's Outrageous Liberal Bias, Media Research Center, c. 2003
  6. ^ Remembering the Ratherisms, Media Research Center, 22 March 2001
  7. ^ "Bias: A CBS Insider Exposes How the Media Distort the News". Regnery Publishing, Inc. December 2001. Retrieved February 13, 2012. 
  8. ^ "A Report on Senator Joseph R. McCarthy". See It Now. CBS. March 9, 1954. Retrieved November 23, 2008. 
  9. ^ Adams, Val. "PRAISE POURS IN ON MURROW SHOW." New York Times. March 11, 1954. p. 19.
  10. ^ ">"Veteran Journalists Criticize 60 Minutes For "Serious Problem" With Benghazi "Witness"". Media Matters for America. November 1, 2013. Retrieved November 11, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Former 60 Minutes Producer Mapes: Benghazi Story Aimed At "Obsessed" Right-Wing Audience". Media Matters for America. November 8, 2013. Retrieved November 11, 2013. 

External links[edit]