Byron Scott

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Byron Scott
Byron Scott.jpg
Byron Scott in 2012 as head coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers.
Los Angeles Lakers
Head Coach
Personal information
Born(1961-03-28) March 28, 1961 (age 53)
Ogden, Utah
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Listed weight195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High schoolMorningside (Inglewood, California)
CollegeArizona State (1979–1983)
NBA draft1983 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4th overall
Selected by the San Diego Clippers
Pro career1983–1998
PositionShooting guard
Number4, 11
Coaching career1998–present
Career history
As player:
19831993Los Angeles Lakers
19931995Indiana Pacers
1995–1996Vancouver Grizzlies
1996–1997Los Angeles Lakers
1997–1998Panathinaikos (Greece)
As coach:
19982000Sacramento Kings (assistant)
20002004New Jersey Nets
20042009New Orleans Hornets
20102013Cleveland Cavaliers
2014–presentLos Angeles Lakers
Career highlights and awards

As player:

As coach:

Career NBA statistics
Points15,097 (14.1 ppg)
Assists2,729 (2.5 apg)
Steals1,224 (1.1 spg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
 
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For the politician, see Byron N. Scott.
Byron Scott
Byron Scott.jpg
Byron Scott in 2012 as head coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers.
Los Angeles Lakers
Head Coach
Personal information
Born(1961-03-28) March 28, 1961 (age 53)
Ogden, Utah
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Listed weight195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High schoolMorningside (Inglewood, California)
CollegeArizona State (1979–1983)
NBA draft1983 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4th overall
Selected by the San Diego Clippers
Pro career1983–1998
PositionShooting guard
Number4, 11
Coaching career1998–present
Career history
As player:
19831993Los Angeles Lakers
19931995Indiana Pacers
1995–1996Vancouver Grizzlies
1996–1997Los Angeles Lakers
1997–1998Panathinaikos (Greece)
As coach:
19982000Sacramento Kings (assistant)
20002004New Jersey Nets
20042009New Orleans Hornets
20102013Cleveland Cavaliers
2014–presentLos Angeles Lakers
Career highlights and awards

As player:

As coach:

Career NBA statistics
Points15,097 (14.1 ppg)
Assists2,729 (2.5 apg)
Steals1,224 (1.1 spg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Byron Antom Scott (born March 28, 1961) is an American former professional basketball player and current head coach of the Los Angeles Lakers.

Scott grew up in Inglewood, California and played at Morningside High School, in the shadow of what was then the Lakers' home arena, The Forum. He attended Arizona State University, but left school in his junior year to sign with the then San Diego Clippers. He was an important component of the Los Angeles Lakers championship teams of the mid-to-late 1980s.

Playing career[edit]

NBA[edit]

Selected by the San Diego Clippers with the 4th pick of the 1983 NBA Draft, he was traded to the Los Angeles Lakers in 1983 in exchange for Norm Nixon. During his playing career, Scott suited up for the Lakers, Indiana Pacers and Vancouver Grizzlies. Scott was a key player for the Lakers during the Showtime era, being a starter alongside Magic Johnson, James Worthy, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and A. C. Green. He played for the Lakers for 10 consecutive seasons (1983–1993). During that time he was on three NBA championship teams (1985, 1987, 1988). As a rookie, he was a member of the 1984 all-rookie team, averaging 10.6 PPG in 22 MPG. He led the NBA in three-point field goal percentage (.433) in 1984-85. 1987-88 was his best season, leading the NBA champions Lakers in scoring, averaging a career-best 21.7 ppg, and in steals (1.91 spg). He was the Lakers' starting shooting guard from 1984 until 1993. He was a player who contributed by his shooting. In 1996-97, the last year of Scott's playing career in the NBA, he went back to the Lakers and proved to be a valuable mentor for a team featuring Shaquille O'Neal, Eddie Jones, Nick Van Exel and 18-year old rookie Kobe Bryant.

Panathinaikos[edit]

Scott as a member of Panathinaikos.

In the summer of 1997, Scott signed with the Greek Basket League team Panathinaikos for the 1997-1998 season. That season, he played with Panathinaikos in both the FIBA Saporta Cup (known then as the FIBA EuroCup), Europe's second-tier level competition after the Euroleague, and the Greek Basket League. In the Saporta Cup's 1997-1998 season, he averaged 13.4 points, 2.4 rebounds, 2.1 assists, and 1.1 steals per game.[1]

Scott helped to lead his team to the Greek Basket League championship with his scoring in many crucial games. After one season with the Greek Basket League champions, Scott retired from playing professional basketball, and began his coaching career.

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GPGames played  GS Games started MPG Minutes per game
 FG% Field goal percentage 3P% 3-point field goal percentage FT% Free throw percentage
 RPG Rebounds per game APG Assists per game SPG Steals per game
 BPG Blocks per game PPG Points per game Bold Career high
Denotes seasons in which Scott won an NBA championship

Regular season[edit]

YearTeamGPGSMPGFG%3P%FT%RPGAPGSPGBPGPPG
1983–84L.A. Lakers744922.1.484.235.8062.22.41.1.310.6
1984–85L.A. Lakers816528.5.539.433.8202.63.01.1.216.0
1985–86L.A. Lakers766228.8.513.361.7842.52.21.1.215.4
1986–87L.A. Lakers828233.3.489.436.8923.53.41.5.217.0
1987–88L.A. Lakers818137.6.527.346.8584.14.11.9.321.7
1988–89L.A. Lakers747335.2.491.399.8634.13.11.5.419.6
1989–90L.A. Lakers777733.7.470.423.7663.13.61.0.415.5
1990–91L.A. Lakers828232.1.477.324.7973.02.21.2.314.5
1991–92L.A. Lakers828232.7.458.344.8383.82.81.3.314.9
1992–93L.A. Lakers585328.9.449.326.8482.32.7.9.213.7
1993–94Indiana67217.9.467.365.8051.62.0.9.110.4
1994–95Indiana80119.1.455.389.8501.91.4.8.210.0
1995–96Vancouver80023.7.401.335.8352.41.5.8.310.2
1996–97L.A. Lakers79818.2.430.388.8411.51.3.6.26.7
Career107371728.1.482.370.8332.82.51.1.314.1

Playoffs[edit]

YearTeamGPGSMPGFG%3P%FT%RPGAPGSPGBPGPPG
1984L.A. Lakers20020.2.460.200.6001.91.7.9.18.6
1985L.A. Lakers191930.8.517.476.7952.72.62.2.216.9
1986L.A. Lakers141433.6.497.353.9053.93.01.4.116.0
1987L.A. Lakers181833.8.490.206.7913.43.21.1.214.8
1988L.A. Lakers242437.4.499.436.8654.22.51.4.219.6
1989L.A. Lakers111136.5.494.385.8364.12.31.6.219.9
1990L.A. Lakers9936.1.462.382.7694.12.62.2.313.4
1991L.A. Lakers181837.7.511.526.7943.21.61.3.213.2
1992L.A. Lakers4437.0.500.583.8892.53.51.5.318.8
1993L.A. Lakers5535.4.500.533.7832.21.81.0.013.6
1994Indiana16014.9.396.474.7842.11.3.8.17.8
1995Indiana17017.5.340.265.8821.5.9.6.16.1
1996L.A. Lakers8016.8.455.364.8951.51.4.1.06.4
Career18312229.3.482.395.8192.92.11.2.213.4

Coaching career[edit]

Sacramento Kings[edit]

Byron Scott began his NBA coaching career in 1998, when he began the first of two seasons as an assistant with the Sacramento Kings. He specialized in teaching perimeter shooting during his tenure with the Kings and helped to lead the team to an excellent three-point shooting percentage during a pair of playoff seasons.

New Jersey Nets[edit]

In 2000, Scott took over a struggling New Jersey Nets team. His team performed poorly in his first year, but that changed in the 2001-02 season with the arrival of Jason Kidd as the Nets raced to a franchise record of 52 wins. In the process, they won their first Atlantic division crown and appeared in their first NBA Finals against the Los Angeles Lakers. Despite losing the championship series to LA, Scott came back to coach the team through another successful season during the 2002-03 campaign, once again taking the team to the NBA Finals, but losing once again—this time to the San Antonio Spurs. New Jersey was up by double figures in game six, but the Spurs tightened up their defense, which won the game and the championship.

Scott was fired during the 2003–04 season, as New Jersey had a disappointing 22–20 record coming into the All-Star break, even though they were leading their division at the time of his dismissal. Rumors of a rift between Scott and Kidd circulated media outlets, with sources allegedly claiming that Kidd wanted Scott out of Jersey. All the parties, including then Nets GM Rod Thorn, denied the reports. Scott claimed that he was "very surprised" by the report and that he and Kidd "always got along".[2]

He was succeeded by his assistant Lawrence Frank.

While coaching the Nets, Scott lived in Livingston, New Jersey.[3]

New Orleans Hornets[edit]

Byron Scott talks to Chris Paul in a 2009 game; Scott was head coach of the New Orleans Hornets from 2004 to 2009.

Scott became the head coach of the New Orleans Hornets in 2004. In the 2005–06 and 2006–07 seasons, he guided the team to a pair of sub .500 seasons. One obstacle was that the team played most of its home games in Oklahoma City due to Hurricane Katrina's devastation of New Orleans.

In the 2007–08 season, Scott had his first winning season as the Hornets head coach. They had a winning percentage of .683 with a record of 56–26. They became Southwest Division champions and finished 2nd overall in the Western Conference. The Hornets clinched the Southwest Division title in their win over the Los Angeles Clippers. Byron Scott was named the head coach of the 2008 Western Conference All-Star team, and a few months after, he was awarded the 2007–2008 NBA coach of the year award. Due to his success the Hornets awarded Scott with a two-year extension.

The Hornets had a 30–11 home record and a 26–15 road record and clinched the second seed in the Western Conference Playoffs. The Hornets won their first round series against the Dallas Mavericks, posting a 4–1 record for the series. They would go on to face the defending Champion San Antonio Spurs in the conference semifinals. An unusual trend of home court blow outs would mark the series until the deciding game 7 when the veteran Spurs would pull out a 91–82 win on the Hornets rowdy home court. The win marked the 100th playoff victory for Spurs coach Greg Popovich.

In the 2008-09, the Hornets finished 49-33 and entered the playoffs as a seventh seed. They faced the Denver Nuggets in the first round losing after five brutal games, including 21 and 29-point blowouts, as well as a 58-point loss in game 4, which tied the worst margin of defeat in NBA postseason history.[4][5](see:2009 NBA playoffs article for more information)

Scott was relieved from his head coaching duties for the Hornets on November 12, 2009, following a 3-6 start.[6] He was mentioned as a candidate for several NBA coaching jobs, including the Chicago Bulls, due to his success coaching another young star point guard Chris Paul.

Following his dismissal, he briefly served as a studio analyst for the NBA on ESPN.

Cleveland Cavaliers[edit]

On July 2, 2010, Scott was named head coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers, a few days before the team lost star LeBron James to the Miami Heat.[7][8] During his first season at the helm of the Cavs, he watched his team endure the longest losing streak ever in the NBA. The 26-game, record-breaking, losing streak ended on February 11, 2011 when they defeated the Los Angeles Clippers in overtime at home. The Cavaliers ended up finishing the season with a 19-63 record which was the second worst record in the NBA, only ahead of the Minnesota Timberwolves. However, like his tenure in New Orleans, he was soon blessed with coaching another Rookie of the Year point guard, this time in Kyrie Irving, whom the Cavaliers selected first overall in the 2011 NBA Draft. His second season in Cleveland saw them improve to 21 victories in a shortened 66-game schedule.

On April 18, 2013, Scott was fired by Cleveland Cavaliers management.[9] During his tenure, the Cavaliers struggled defensively, ranking in the bottom five of the league in defensive efficiency in each of his three seasons.[10]

Los Angeles Lakers[edit]

Scott spent the 2013–14 season as a Lakers television analyst on Time Warner Cable SportsNet.[11] After the season, he was the frontrunner to become the new Lakers head coach. Scott interviewed three times for the position, which had become vacant after Mike D'Antoni's resignation.[12] On July 28, 2014, he signed a multi-year contract to coach the Lakers.[13]

Coaching record[edit]

Legend
Regular seasonGGames coachedWGames wonLGames lostW–L %Win-loss %
Post seasonPGPlayoff gamesPWPlayoff winsPLPlayoff lossesPW–L %Playoff win-loss %
TeamYearGWLW–L%FinishPGPWPLPW–L%Result
New Jersey2000–01822656.3176th in AtlanticMissed Playoffs
New Jersey2001–02825230.6341st in Atlantic20119.550Lost in NBA Finals
New Jersey2002–03824933.5981st in Atlantic20146.700Lost in NBA Finals
New Jersey2003–04422220.524(fired)
New Orleans2004–05821864.2205th in SouthwestMissed Playoffs
New Orleans2005–06823844.4634th in SouthwestMissed Playoffs
New Orleans2006–07823943.4764th in SouthwestMissed Playoffs
New Orleans2007–08825626.6831st in Southwest1275.583Lost in Conf. Semifinals
New Orleans2008–09824933.5984th in Southwest514.200Lost in First Round
New Orleans2009–10936.333(fired)
Cleveland2010–11821963.2325th in CentralMissed Playoffs
Cleveland2011–12662145.3185th in CentralMissed Playoffs
Cleveland2012–13822458.2935th in CentralMissed Playoffs
Career937416521.444573324.579

Personal life[edit]

Scott's non-profit organization, The Byron Scott Children’s Fund, has raised more than $15 million over the past decade, with the proceeds going to various children’s charities.[14] Scott has recently served as a studio analyst for ABC's NBA telecasts and was featured on ESPN.

Scott and his wife, Anita, have three children, Thomas, LonDen and DaRon.[15] On June 2013, Byron and Anita separated and on March 2014, Byron filed for divorce after 29 years of marriage due to irreconcilable differences. [16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ FIBAEurope.com Byron Anton Scott (PANATHINAIKOS BSA ATHENS).
  2. ^ Thorn said no demands were ever made - espnW
  3. ^ Bondy, Filip. "VISITORS ARE FEELING RIGHT AT HOME IN JERSEY", Daily News (New York), May 25, 2003. Accessed February 24, 2011. "'I've learned everything I need to know about New Jersey,' said Scott, who resides in Livingston during the season. 'You take 280 to the 'Pike to the arena.'"
  4. ^ Game 4 scoreboard
  5. ^ Game 4 Recap
  6. ^ "New Orleans Hornets fire coach Byron Scott". usatoday.com. November 12, 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-12. 
  7. ^ "Agent says Scott accepts Cavs offer". cbssports.com. July 2, 2010. Retrieved 2009-07-01. 
  8. ^ Cleveland Cavaliers exercise contract option on Byron Scott - NBA - Sporting News
  9. ^ Cleveland Cavaliers fire coach Byron Scott
  10. ^ Concepcion, Jason (November 4, 2014). "An NBA Detective Story: Who in the Lakers Organization Knows They’re Tanking?". Grantland. Archived from the original on November 13, 2014. 
  11. ^ McMenamin, Dave (July 25, 2014). "Byron Scott the right man for Kobe, Lakers". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on July 26, 2014. 
  12. ^ Broussard, Chris (July 25, 2014). "Lakers, Byron Scott talking offer". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on July 25, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Lakers Announce Hiring of Byron Scott as Head Coach" (Press release). Los Angeles Lakers. July 28, 2014. Archived from the original on July 28, 2014. 
  14. ^ http://officialbyronscott.com/
  15. ^ http://www.sportsstarsusa.com/Byron-Scott
  16. ^ http://www.tmz.com/2014/03/19/byron-scott-divorce-anita/

External links[edit]