BuzzFeed

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BuzzFeed
BuzzFeed.svg
TypePrivate
Foundation date2006
HeadquartersNew York City, New York, USA
Key people

Jonah Peretti, CEO
Jon Steinberg, President
Ben Smith, Editor-in-Chief

Andy Wiedlin, CRO
Peggy Wang, Senior Editor
Ze Frank, Executive Vice President
Jason Kottke, Advisor
OwnerBuzzFeed Inc.
Slogan(s)"The Media Company for the Social Age"
WebsiteBuzzFeed.com
Alexa rankpositive decrease 151 (February 2014)[1]
Type of siteNews & Entertainment
AdvertisingNative
RegistrationOptional
Available inEnglish
Current statusActive
 
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BuzzFeed
BuzzFeed.svg
TypePrivate
Foundation date2006
HeadquartersNew York City, New York, USA
Key people

Jonah Peretti, CEO
Jon Steinberg, President
Ben Smith, Editor-in-Chief

Andy Wiedlin, CRO
Peggy Wang, Senior Editor
Ze Frank, Executive Vice President
Jason Kottke, Advisor
OwnerBuzzFeed Inc.
Slogan(s)"The Media Company for the Social Age"
WebsiteBuzzFeed.com
Alexa rankpositive decrease 151 (February 2014)[1]
Type of siteNews & Entertainment
AdvertisingNative
RegistrationOptional
Available inEnglish
Current statusActive

BuzzFeed is a social news and entertainment website. Founded in 2006 in New York City as a viral lab by Jonah Peretti, the company has grown into a global media and technology company covering topics like Politics, DIY, Animals, Longform and Business. In 2012, Ben Smith of Politico was hired as Editor-in-Chief, and is responsible for expanding the site into serious journalism, long-form and reportage while maintaining its popular fun and entertainment-oriented content.[2]

Homepage content[edit]

The BuzzFeed homepage consists of a time-sequential list of posts from users and staff members. The content of the posts is usually either a video, image, or link. These posts are the site's attempt to capture the essence of viral media currently resonating on the web. On Fridays, the website hosts a battle, where users are challenged to post the best, most time-wasting Flash game. Other posts are compendiums of memes or images that are all similar to each other in some way. Occasionally there are quizzes.

On November 5, 2012, it was announced that former Spin Editor-in-Chief Steve Kandell had been hired to lead the site's expansion into longform journalistic content.[3][4]

User profiles[edit]

Every registered user of BuzzFeed has a homepage that contains links to their most recent contributions to the site. There is also a brief bio section and a scoreboard of how many times these users' posts have been featured on the homepage or awarded "Gold Stars" by the staff.

BuzzFeed labs[edit]

BuzzFeed Labs are an ongoing effort on the part of the BuzzFeed editors to track, test, and to sometimes create viral media. Past efforts have included: attempting to break a beer bottle in half for use as a shiv in a bar fight, citizen journalism investigating a fire on the Manhattan Bridge, and the creation of a giant energy malt liquor drink using a forty ounce beer and a can of Red Bull. These labs are conducted sporadically and have no set release schedule.

Badges[edit]

A key component of Buzzfeed's ongoing mission to sort, certify, and promote the viral web is the use of "Badges". Tags like "LOL", "Eww", "Old", "AWFUL", "WTF", "TRASHY", "GEEKY", "CUTE", "WIN", and "OMG" are available for users to award to posts that they feel merit them. If enough users feel the same way, then a visual badge is tacked onto the edge of the thumbnail image for that post, alerting others to its content.

Controversy[edit]

Buzzfeed has sometimes been accused of copying original content from competitors throughout the online and offline press. On June 28, 2012 Gawker's Adrien Chen posted a story titled "BuzzFeed and the Plagiarism Problem".[5] On March 8, 2013 The Atlantic Wire addressed a similar issue.[6] On September 17, 2013 The Kernel ran an article titled "BuzzFeed Stole My Wired Article" [7] written by correspondent Nimrod Kämer. On October 21, 2013 writer and satirist Maddox published an article in which he thoroughly examines Buzzfeed's quality, content, its policy towards sources, its fair use practices, and its tagging services.[8]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Buzzfeed.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 2014-02-01. 
  2. ^ Stelter, Brian (2011-12-12). "BuzzFeed Adds Politico Writer". Mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2012-01-21. 
  3. ^ "Steve Kandell Joins BuzzFeed As Longform Editor". BuzzFeed. 2013-11-05. Retrieved 2013-01-24. 
  4. ^ Sisaro, Ben (2013-11-05). "Former Spin Editor to Run BuzzFeed’s Long-Form Coverage,". New York Times. Retrieved 2013-01-24. 
  5. ^ "Remix Everything: BuzzFeed and the Plagiarism Problem"
  6. ^ "BuzzFeed's 'Happiest Facts of All Time' Were Mostly Plagiarized from Reddit"
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ Maddox (George Ouzounian), I hate Buzzfeed, The Best Page in the Universe, published October 21st 2013.

References[edit]

External links[edit]