Bug-out bag

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Off-the-shelf Red Cross preparedness kit .

A bug-out bag[1][2] is a portable kit that contains the items one would require to survive for seventy-two hours[3][4] when evacuating from a disaster. The focus is on evacuation, rather than long-term survival, distinguishing the bug-out bag from a survival kit, a boating or aviation emergency kit, or a fixed-site disaster supplies kit. The kits are also popular in the survivalism subculture.[5]

The term "bug-out bag" is related to, and possibly derived from, the "bail-out bag" emergency kit many military aviators carry. In the United States, the term refers to the Korean War practice of the U.S. Army designating alternate defensive positions, in the event that the unit(s) had to displace. They were directed to "bug-out" when being overrun was imminent. The concept passed into wide usage among other military and law enforcement personnel, though the "bail-out bag" is as likely to include emergency gear for going into an emergency situation as for escaping an emergency.[6]

Other names for such a bag are a "72-hour kit",[7] a "grab bag",[8] a "battle box", a "Personal Emergency Relocation Kits" (PERK), a "go bag" or a "GOOD bag" (Get Out Of Dodge).[9]

Contents

Rationale

The primary purpose of a bug-out bag is to allow one to evacuate quickly if a disaster should strike.[10] It is therefore prudent to gather all of the materials and supplies that might be required to do this into a single place, such as a bag or a few storage containers. The recommendation that a bug-out bag contain enough supplies for seventy-two hours arises from advice from organizations responsible for disaster relief and management that it may take them up to seventy-two hours to reach people affected by a disaster and offer help.[3] The bag's contents may vary according to the region of the user, as someone evacuating from the path of a hurricane may have different supplies from someone one who lives in an area prone to tornadoes or wildfires.

In addition to allowing one to survive a disaster evacuation, a bug-out bag may also be utilized when sheltering in place as a response to emergencies such as house fires, blackouts, tornadoes, and other severe natural disasters.

Typical contents

The suggested contents of a bug-out bag vary, but most of the following are usually included:[11][12][13]

See also

References

  1. ^ J. Allan South, The Sense of Survival, Chapter 11 (Equipment), Bug-Out Bag Contents, p. 221, Timpanogos Publishers, Orem, Utah, 1990, ISBN 0-935329-00-5
  2. ^ Lundin, Cody, When All Hell Breaks Loose: Stuff You Need To Survive When Disaster Strikes , Chapter 3 (Includes a Bug Out Kit list) Gibbs Smith, Publisher, Layton, Utah, Sep. 2007
  3. ^ a b "Disaster Supplies Kit- Canadian Red Cross". Redcross.ca. 2007-05-03. http://www.redcross.ca/main.asp?id=000289. Retrieved 2009-09-05.
  4. ^ "FEMA: Disaster Planning Is Up To You". Fema.gov. http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=35169. Retrieved 2009-09-05.
  5. ^ Rawles, James Wesley, Rawles on Retreats and Relocation, The Clearwater Press, Kooskia, ID, 2007, p. 5
  6. ^ "The Bail Out Bag". BlueSheepdog.com. 2009-07-16. http://www.bluesheepdog.com/2009/07/16/the-bail-out-bag/. Retrieved 2011-06-18.
  7. ^ "72 Hour Kit – How to Make a 72 Hour Kit for Emergency Preparedness". Lds.about.com. http://lds.about.com/od/preparednessfoodstorage/a/72hour_kit.htm. Retrieved 2009-09-05.
  8. ^ Make an Emergency Grab Bag, Blackpool Council, retrieved 2011-08-19
  9. ^ Frank Borelli. Equipment Review: Bug Out Bags? Officer.com. Posted September 4, 2009.
  10. ^ Dr. Bruce Clayton, Life After Doomsday, Chapter 3 (To Flee of Not To Flee), p. 39, Paladin Press, Boulder, CO, 1980
  11. ^ J. Allan South, The Sense of Survival, Chapter 11 (Equipment), Bug-Out Bag Contents, p. 221, Timpanogos Publishers, Orem, Utah, 1990 ISBN
  12. ^ Building Kits: Getting Prepared takes commitment, by Mike Peterson, American Survival Guide Magazine, Dec., 1993, p. 76
  13. ^ Survival Skills Intensive Training: Assembling the Bug Out Kit, by Christopher Nyerges, American Survival Guide Magazine, May, 1998, p. 26
  14. ^ "Preparing a Family Emergency Kit". Public Safety Canada. http://www.getprepared.gc.ca/sm/trnscrpt_kt-eng.aspx. Retrieved 2010-04-13.
  15. ^ "Household Emergency Checklist". Civil Defence NZ. http://www.getthru.govt.nz/web/GetThru.nsf/web/BOWN-7GZTZF?OpenDocument. Retrieved 2010-04-13.
  16. ^ "Get a Kit". FEMA. http://www.ready.gov/america/getakit/index.html. Retrieved 2010-04-13.
  17. ^ Rawles, James Wesley, Rawles on Retreats and Relocation, The Clearwater Press, Kooskia, ID, 2007, p. 133
  18. ^ Rawles, James Wesley, Rawles on Retreats and Relocation, The Clearwater Press, Kooskia, ID, 2007, p. 119
  19. ^ Survival Kits: Consideration of personal situations in making your own kits, by Hal Gordon, American Survival Guide Magazine, Nov., 1986, p. 57
  20. ^ The Commuter Kit: Essential Tools for Daily Commuters, by M. Marlo Brown, American Survival Guide Magazine, Jan. 2000, p. 112
  21. ^ Survival Kits: Critical 10 Percent, by Daniel C. Friend, American Survival Guide Magazine, Mar. 1990, p. 30
  22. ^ "Survival Gear Bags webpage - 10/26/10". http://store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?yhst-63492799070774+aRn2GH+index.html+ssg5.
  23. ^ Rawles, James Wesley, Rawles on Retreats and Relocation, The Clearwater Press, Kooskia, ID, 2007, p. 121
  24. ^ Rawles, James Wesley, Rawles on Retreats and Relocation, The Clearwater Press, Kooskia, ID, 2007, p. 120
  25. ^ Rawles, James Wesley, Rawles on Retreats and Relocation, The Clearwater Press, Kooskia, ID, 2007, p. 31

External links