Brylcreem

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Brylcreem
A tub of Brylcreem
Launch year1928
CompanyCounty Chemicals, Birmingham, England.
AvailabilityYes
Current supplierCombe Incorporated, Unilever, HUL
URLofficial website
 
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Brylcreem
A tub of Brylcreem
Launch year1928
CompanyCounty Chemicals, Birmingham, England.
AvailabilityYes
Current supplierCombe Incorporated, Unilever, HUL
URLofficial website

Brylcreem /ˈbrɪlkrm/ is a brand of hair styling products for men. The first Brylcreem product was a pomade created in 1928 by County Chemicals at the Chemico Works in Bradford Street, Birmingham, England. The pomade is an emulsion of water and mineral oil stabilised with beeswax.

Beecham was the longtime owner of Brylcreem. Sara Lee bought the personal care unit of SmithKline Beecham in 1992. In 2012, the global rights to sell Brylcreem brand was sold by Sara Lee Corporation to Unilever.

Various Brylcreem products are sold worldwide. Brylcreem is marketed in the US by Combe Incorporated, in Europe by Unilever and in India by HUL. Before Godrej acquired 51 percent stake of Sara Lee in their joint venture Godrej Sara Lee in 2010, the brand was distributed by Godrej in India.

Jingle[edit]

Denis Compton, the Arsenal defender and England cricketer, advertised Brylcreem in the 1950s.[citation needed]

It was first advertised on television with the jingle "Brylcreem — A Little Dab'll Do Ya! Brylcreem — You'll look so debonaire. Brylcreem — The gals'll pursue ya; Simply put a little on your hair."

The Brylcreem TV advertisement (at least in Australia) was a cartoon animation of a man with initially tousled hair who happily has a little dab applied, and, miraculously, the hair combs and smooths itself. Many youngsters aspiring to have well-oiled, well-combed hair, like "Cookie" on the glamorous Private Eye TV show "Seventy-Seven Sunset Strip", must have been disappointed to find that the little dab did not do the combing itself.

When the dry look became popular, partly inspired by the unoiled moptops of the Beatles, the last line was changed from "They'll love to run their fingers through your hair", to "They'll love the natural look it gives your hair."

Subsequent television advertisements used the mottoes "Grooms without gumming" and later, in the 1970s in the UK and Canada, "A little dab of Brylcreem on your hair gives you the Brylcreem jump in the air".

Notable users and popular culture[edit]

Brylcreem poster at a UK train station, 1944

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Guardian, 30 April 2001.

External links[edit]