British Aerospace 125

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BAe 125/Dominie
Hawker 1000
BAe 125 CC3 of No. 32 Squadron RAF
RoleMid-size business jet
Manufacturerde Havilland (design)
Hawker Siddeley (to 1977)
British Aerospace (1977–1993)
Raytheon (1993–2007)

Hawker Beechcraft (2007-2013)

First flight13 August 1962
StatusActive service
Primary usersRoyal Air Force
Brazilian Air Force
Produced1962- 2013
Number built1,000+
VariantsHawker 800
 
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BAe 125/Dominie
Hawker 1000
BAe 125 CC3 of No. 32 Squadron RAF
RoleMid-size business jet
Manufacturerde Havilland (design)
Hawker Siddeley (to 1977)
British Aerospace (1977–1993)
Raytheon (1993–2007)

Hawker Beechcraft (2007-2013)

First flight13 August 1962
StatusActive service
Primary usersRoyal Air Force
Brazilian Air Force
Produced1962- 2013
Number built1,000+
VariantsHawker 800

The British Aerospace 125 (Originally the de Havilland DH125 Jet Dragon) is a twin-engine mid-size corporate jet, with newer variants now marketed as the Hawker 800. It was known as the Hawker Siddeley HS.125 until 1977. It was also used by the Royal Air Force as a navigation trainer (as the Hawker Siddeley Dominie T1) until January 2011,[1] and was used by the United States Air Force as a calibration aircraft (as the C-29).

Development[edit]

Prototype at the 1962 Farnborough Air Show

In 1961, de Havilland began working on a revolutionary small business jet, the DH.125 Jet Dragon, intended to replace the piston engined de Havilland Dove business aircraft and light transport. The DH.125 design was for a low-winged monoplane with a pressurised fuselage accommodating two pilots and six passengers. It was powered by two Bristol Siddeley Viper turbojets mounted on the rear fuselage. The slightly swept wing employed large slotted flaps and airbrakes to allow operation from small airfields. The first of two prototypes flew on 13 August 1962, with the second following on 12 December that year.[2] The first production aircraft, longer and with a greater wingspan than the two prototypes, flew on 12 February 1963, with the first delivery to a customer on 10 September 1964.[3][4]

The aircraft went through many designation changes during its service life. Hawker Siddeley had bought de Havilland the year before project start, but the old legacy brand and the "DH" designation was used throughout development. After the jet achieved full production, the name was finally changed to "HS.125". When Hawker Siddeley Aircraft merged with the British Aircraft Corporation to form British Aerospace in 1977, the name changed to BAe 125. Then, when British Aerospace sold its Business Jets Division to Raytheon in 1993, the jet acquired the name Raytheon Hawker. The fuselage, wings and tail-fin are to this day fully assembled and partially equipped (primary and secondary flight controls) in Airbus UK's Broughton plant, on the outskirts of Chester, sub-assemblies are produced in Airbus UK's Buckley site. All these assembled components are then shipped to Wichita, Kansas in the United States, to where final assembly was transferred in 1996.

Over 1,000 aircraft have been built. On the 18th October 2012 the negotiations for the sale of Hawker beechcraft had failed and the company decided to cease jet production and exited bankruptcy on its own on 19 February 2013, under a new name, Beechcraft Corporation

In 2013, the FAA modified 14 CFR part 91 rules to prohibit the operation of jets weighing 75,000 pounds or less that are not stage 3 noise compliant after December 31, 2015. The HS.125-1/2/3, -400 and -600 are listed explicitly in Federal Register 78 FR 39576. Any HS.125s that have not been modified by installing Stage 3 noise compliant engines or have not had "hushkits" installed for non-compliant engines will not be permitted to fly in the contiguous 48 states after December 31, 2015. 14 CFR §91.883 Special flight authorizations for jet airplanes weighing 75,000 pounds or less - lists special flight authorizations that may be granted for operation after December 31, 2015.

Variants[edit]

A Dominie navigation trainer of the Royal Air Force
Raytheon Hawker 800

Operators[edit]

Civil operators[edit]

Private operators, air taxi, shared ownership and corporate charter operators worldwide. Between 1965 and 1972 Qantas used two Series 3s for crew training.

Military operators[edit]

 Brazil
 Japan
 Malawi
 Nigeria
 Saudi Arabia
 Turkmenistan
 United Kingdom
 Uruguay

Former operators[edit]

 Argentina
 Biafra
 Botswana
 Ghana
 Ireland
 Malaysia
 Nicaragua
 South Africa
 United Kingdom
 United States

Accidents and incidents[edit]

Specifications (HS 125 Series 600)[edit]

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1976–77[20]

General characteristics

Performance

See also[edit]

Related development
Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ "RAF's oldest aircraft retires". RAF News. 27 January 2011. Retrieved 11 March 2011. 
  2. ^ Jackson 1987, pp. 506–507.
  3. ^ Jackson 1973, p. 277.
  4. ^ Taylor 1965, pp. 148–149.
  5. ^ Jackson 1973, pp. 280–281.
  6. ^ Jackson 1973, pp. 277–281.
  7. ^ http://raytheon.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43&item=312
  8. ^ Uruguay; AF orders two HS-125 for VIP flight - Dmilt.com, May 24, 2013
  9. ^ "N235KC Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 22 June 2010. 
  10. ^ World News Flight 10 August 1967
  11. ^ [1]
  12. ^ "The curious Mercurius". 2002-05-03. Retrieved 2010-03-23. 
  13. ^ "Report No: 1/1977. Report on the accident to Hawker Siddeley HS 125 Series 600B, G-BCUX near Dunsfold Aerodrome, Surrey, 20 November 1975". AAIB. 1977-02-08. Retrieved 2011-07-21. 
  14. ^ "Accident description FAB-2129". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 17 June 2011. 
  15. ^ Hatch, Paul (29 November – 5 December 1989). "World's Air Forces 1989". Flight International: p. 42. 
  16. ^ Granberry, Michael (1991-03-17). "8 Country Band Members Die in S.D. Air Crash". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2009-08-25. 
  17. ^ "East Coast Jets N818MV". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 2011-07-02. 
  18. ^ "Crash during attempted go-around, East Coast Jets flight 81 (ref NTSB/AAR-11/01)". NTSB. Retrieved 2011-07-02. 
  19. ^ "Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 27 October 2009. 
  20. ^ Taylor 1976, pp. 178–179.

External links[edit]