Brigantine, New Jersey

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Brigantine, New Jersey
—  City  —
View of Brigantine from Revel Atlantic City
Motto: "An island you'll love for life!"
Map of Brigantine in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Brigantine, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 39°25′38″N 74°23′23″W / 39.427291°N 74.389617°W / 39.427291; -74.389617Coordinates: 39°25′38″N 74°23′23″W / 39.427291°N 74.389617°W / 39.427291; -74.389617
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyAtlantic
IncorporatedJune 14, 1890
Government[1]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • MayorPhilip J. Guenther, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2013)[2]
 • ManagerJennifer Blumenthal[3]
Area[4]
 • Total10.364 sq mi (26.844 km2)
 • Land6.387 sq mi (16.543 km2)
 • Water3.977 sq mi (10.301 km2)  38.37%
Area rank207th of 566 in state
11th of 23 in county[4]
Elevation[5]0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010 Census)[6][7][8]
 • Total9,450
 • Rank252nd of 566 in state
9th of 23 in county[9]
 • Density1,479.5/sq mi (571.2/km2)
 • Density rank338th of 566 in state
10th of 23 in county[9]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08203[10]
Area code(s)609
FIPS code3400107810[11]
GNIS feature ID0885171[12][4]
Websitehttp://www.brigantinebeachnj.com
 
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Brigantine, New Jersey
—  City  —
View of Brigantine from Revel Atlantic City
Motto: "An island you'll love for life!"
Map of Brigantine in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Brigantine, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 39°25′38″N 74°23′23″W / 39.427291°N 74.389617°W / 39.427291; -74.389617Coordinates: 39°25′38″N 74°23′23″W / 39.427291°N 74.389617°W / 39.427291; -74.389617
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyAtlantic
IncorporatedJune 14, 1890
Government[1]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • MayorPhilip J. Guenther, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2013)[2]
 • ManagerJennifer Blumenthal[3]
Area[4]
 • Total10.364 sq mi (26.844 km2)
 • Land6.387 sq mi (16.543 km2)
 • Water3.977 sq mi (10.301 km2)  38.37%
Area rank207th of 566 in state
11th of 23 in county[4]
Elevation[5]0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010 Census)[6][7][8]
 • Total9,450
 • Rank252nd of 566 in state
9th of 23 in county[9]
 • Density1,479.5/sq mi (571.2/km2)
 • Density rank338th of 566 in state
10th of 23 in county[9]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08203[10]
Area code(s)609
FIPS code3400107810[11]
GNIS feature ID0885171[12][4]
Websitehttp://www.brigantinebeachnj.com
Beach at Brigantine, on the Atlantic Ocean side of the island

Brigantine is an island city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 9,450.[6][7][8]

What is now the City of Brigantine has passed through a series of names and reincorporations since it was first created. The area was originally incorporated as Brigantine Beach Borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on June 14, 1890 from portions of Galloway Township, based on the results of a referendum held on June 3, 1890. On April 23, 1897, the area was reincorporated as the City of Brigantine City. This name lasted until April 9, 1914, when it was renamed the City of East Atlantic City. On March 16, 1924, Brigantine was incorporated as a city, replacing East Atlantic City and incorporating further portions of Galloway Township.[13]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Brigantine as its 36th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[14]

Contents

Geography

Brigantine is located at 39°25′38″N 74°23′23″W / 39.427291°N 74.389617°W / 39.427291; -74.389617 (39.427291,-74.389617). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 10.364 square miles (26.844 km2), of which, 6.387 square miles (16.543 km2) of it is land and 3.977 square miles (10.301 km2) of it (38.37%) is water.[15][4] Brigantine is located on Brigantine Beach Island. The only road to and from Brigantine is New Jersey Route 87, locally known as Brigantine Boulevard.

Demographics

Historical populations
CensusPop.
191067
192012−82.1%
19303572,875.0%
194040312.9%
19501,267214.4%
19604,201231.6%
19706,74160.5%
19808,31823.4%
199011,35436.5%
200012,59410.9%
20109,450−25.0%
Est. 20119,443[16]−0.1%
Population sources:1910-1930[17]
1930-1990[18] 2000[19] 2010[6][7][8]

2010 Census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 9,450 people, 4,294 households, and 2,521 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,479.5 inhabitants per square mile (571.2 /km2). There were 9,222 housing units at an average density of 1,443.8 per square mile (557.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 87.33% (8,253) White, 2.91% (275) Black or African American, 0.17% (16) Native American, 4.72% (446) Asian, 0.03% (3) Pacific Islander, 2.51% (237) from other races, and 2.33% (220) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.88% (650) of the population.[6]

There were 4,294 households out of which 18.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.3% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.3% were non-families. 33.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.79.[6]

In the city the population was spread out with 16.4% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 21.0% from 25 to 44, 33.6% from 45 to 64, and 21.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48.4 years. For every 100 females there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.[6]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,212 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,472) and the median family income was $79,318 (+/- $7,962). Males had a median income of $55,595 (+/- $5,655) versus $42,622 (+/- $5,179) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,571 (+/- $3,305). About 5.9% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 3.9% of those age 65 or over.[20]

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census[11] there were 12,594 people, 5,473 households, and 3,338 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,959.0 people per square mile (756.2/km2). There were 9,304 housing units at an average density of 1,447.2 per square mile (558.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 83.15% White, 3.94% African American, 0.18% Native American, 5.72% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 4.67% from other races, and 2.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.41% of the population.[19]

There were 5,473 households out of which 24.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.9% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.0% were non-families. 30.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.89.[19]

In the city the population was spread out with 20.8% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 95.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.4 males.[19]

The median income for a household in the city was $44,639, and the median income for a family was $51,679. Males had a median income of $40,523 versus $29,779 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,950. About 7.6% of families and 9.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.9% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.[19]

Government

Local government

Based on a vote of the electorate in 1989, the form of government in the City of Brigantine has been established as the Council-Manager plan under the Faulkner Act. The City of Brigantine is governed by a City Council consisting of a Mayor (elected at large), two at-large Council members and four ward Council members – each serving four-year terms. The Mayor presides over the meetings of City Council. The functions of the Council are, among others, to adopt the municipal budget and to enact ordinances to promote and ensure the security, health, government and protection of the City and its residents.[1][21]

As of 2012, the Mayor of Brigantine City is Philip J. Guenther. Members of the City Council are Frank Kern (at-large), Tony Pullella (at-large), Robert Solari (Ward 1), Steve Bonanni (Ward 2), Sam Storino (Ward 3) and Rick DeLucry (Ward 4).[21]

Federal, state and county representation

Brigantine is located in the 2nd Congressional District[22] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[7][23][24]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[25] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken).

The 2nd legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jim Whelan (D, Atlantic City), and in the General Assembly by John F. Amodeo (R, Margate) and Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor).[26] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[27] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[28]

Atlantic County is governed by a County Executive directly chosen by voters, with the county's legislature, the Board of Chosen Freeholders, consisting of nine members elected to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with three seats coming up for election each year; four of its members are elected at-large and there are five election districts, each of which elect a single member.[29][30] The County Executive is Dennis Levinson (Linwood, term ends December 31, 2015.[31] As of 2013, Atlantic County's Freeholders are the four at-large members; Colin G. Bell (Northfield, 2015)[32], Alexander C. Marino (Linwood, 2014)[33], Vice Chairman Joseph J. McDevitt (Ventnor City, 2013)[34] and John W. Risley (Northfield, 2014)[35]; and five district members elected from District 1 (Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville) Charles T. Garrett (Atlantic City, 2013)[36], District 2 - (Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Longport, Margate City, Somers Point and Ventnor City), Chairman Frank D. Formica (Atlantic City, 2015)[37], District 3 (Egg Harbor Township (part), Hamilton Township (part), Linwood and Northfield) - Frank Sutton (Egg Harbor Township, 2014)[38], District 4 (Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic - Richard Dase (Galloway Township, 2013)[39] and District 5 (Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth Township) - James A. Bertino (Hammonton, 2015).[40][29]

Education

The Brigantine Public Schools serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade. The district is governed by the Brigantine Board of Education and operates as a Type 1 school district. The School Board consists of seven members who are appointed to three-year terms by the Mayor, the Council and the City Manager on a staggered basis.[41]

Schools in the district (with 2009-10 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[42]) are Brigantine Elementary School serves grades PreK-4 (471 students) and Brigantine North Middle School serves grades 5-8 (342 students).

Students in public school for grades 9-12, along with those from Longport, Margate City and Ventnor City, attend Atlantic City High School in neighboring Atlantic City, as part of sending/receiving relationships with the Atlantic City School District.[43]

Points of interest

Notable people

References

  1. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 13.
  2. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, dated February 21, 2013. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  3. ^ Administration, City of Brigantine Beach. Accessed January 14, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c d Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 18, 2012.
  5. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Brigantine, Geographic Names Information System, accessed January 4, 2008.
  6. ^ a b c d e f DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 - 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Brigantine city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  7. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 1. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Brigantine city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  9. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  10. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 26, 2011.
  11. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  12. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  13. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 67. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  14. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  15. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  16. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2011, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  17. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed January 14, 2012.
  18. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 26, 2011.
  19. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Brigantine borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  20. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Brigantine borough, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Mayor and City Council, City of Brigantine. Accessed January 14, 2012.
  22. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  23. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  24. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  25. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  26. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  27. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/about/. Retrieved 2010-01-21.
  28. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/lt/. Retrieved 2010-01-21.
  29. ^ a b Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  30. ^ Atlantic County District Map 2013, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  31. ^ County Executive Dennis Levinson, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  32. ^ Colin G. Bell, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  33. ^ Alexander C. Marino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  34. ^ Joseph C. McDevitt, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  35. ^ John W. Risley, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  36. ^ Charles T. Garrett, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  37. ^ Frank D. Formica, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Frank Sutton, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  39. ^ Richard Dase, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  40. ^ James A. Bertino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  41. ^ School Facilities, City of Brigantine. Accessed March 24, 2011.
  42. ^ Data for the Brigantine Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed May 23, 2011.
  43. ^ Home page, Atlantic City High School. Accessed May 23, 2011. "ACHS is a unique, comprehensive state-of-the-art facility that serves a diverse student population from Atlantic City, Brigantine, Longport, Margate and Ventnor."
  44. ^ Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, GORP. Accessed June 2, 2009. "Forsythe Refuge's Brigantine and Barnegat Divisions were ... established in 1939 and 1967 respectively, to perpetuate the use of tidal wetland and shallow bay habitat by migratory water birds."
  45. ^ [1]
  46. ^ [2]
  47. ^ [3]
  48. ^ Staff. "REMEMBER WHEN: BUDDING ROMANCE, 1880", The Press of Atlantic City, March 8, 2006. Accessed July 1, 2011. "Mary Raith Holst, of Brigantine, submitted this picture of some of her ancestors, taken during a Morris Guard encampment at Delaware Water Gap in the 1880s."
  49. ^ Landau, Joel. "Kennedys introduce newborn son to media outside hospital in Galloway Township", The Press of Atlantic City, April 18, 2012. Accessed April 18, 2012. "Kennedy, 44, the son of the late U.S. Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy and nephew of President John F. Kennedy, was dressed in a sport coat and jeans and cracked a few jokes before the couple departed to their Brigantine home."
  50. ^ Good, Daniel. "A mature subject for local author's new teen novel", The Press of Atlantic City, July 13, 2008. Accessed September 2, 2008. "The work station in her Absecon home resembles a child's bedroom....Plum-Ucci, a Brigantine native, situates her stories in the towns and beaches from her childhood."
  51. ^ via United Press. "Cornell Elects Rosenbaum", The New York Times, December 4, 1954. Accessed April 18, 2012. "John J. Rosenbaum Jr. of Brigantine, N. J., today was elected captain of Cornell's 1955 varsity cross-country team."

External links

Preceded by
Beach Haven
Beaches of New JerseySucceeded by
Atlantic City