Bridgerule

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Bridgerule
Cornish: Ponsrowald
Bridgerule is located in Devon
Bridgerule
Bridgerule
 Bridgerule shown within Devon
Population570 
OS grid referenceSS2702
DistrictTorridge
Shire countyDevon
RegionSouth West
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
PoliceDevon and Cornwall
FireDevon and Somerset
AmbulanceSouth Western
EU ParliamentSouth West England
List of places
UK
England
Devon
 
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Coordinates: 50°47′N 4°27′W / 50.79°N 04.45°W / 50.79; -04.45

Bridgerule
Cornish: Ponsrowald
Bridgerule is located in Devon
Bridgerule
Bridgerule
 Bridgerule shown within Devon
Population570 
OS grid referenceSS2702
DistrictTorridge
Shire countyDevon
RegionSouth West
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
PoliceDevon and Cornwall
FireDevon and Somerset
AmbulanceSouth Western
EU ParliamentSouth West England
List of places
UK
England
Devon

Bridgerule (Cornish: Ponsrowald)[1][dead link] is a village and civil parish in Devon, England, a mile from the border with Cornwall. The parish is divided by the River Tamar, which no longer forms the border between Devon and Cornwall there. The river often floods the High Street.

History[edit]

Bridgerule was mentioned (as Brige) in the Domesday Book in 1086, when the local manor was held by a Norman, Ruald Adobed. The name is thought to come from bridge and Ruald.[2]

Until 1844 the Tamar formed the border between Devon and Cornwall, and the western part of the parish was in Cornwall. West Bridgerule was transferred to Devon by the Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844. When civil parishes were created in 1866, East Bridgerule and West Bridgerule became separate parishes, but the two were re-united in 1950.[3]

Whitstone and Bridgerule railway station on the line from Okehampton to Bude served the village, opening in 1898 and closing in 1966.

Church[edit]

There is a 15th-century church dedicated, as at Bridestowe, to Saint Bridget, who is commemorated with a statue. There are also several paintings and carvings within. The baptismal font is very old, dating to Saxon times.

References[edit]

External links[edit]