Brandon, Vermont

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Brandon, Vermont
Town
Brandon, Vermont
Brandon, Vermont
CountryUnited States
StateVermont
CountyRutland
Area
 • Total40.2 sq mi (104.0 km2)
 • Land40.1 sq mi (103.9 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Population (2010)
 • Total3,966
 • Density99/sq mi (38/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code05733
Area code(s)802
Websitewww.town.brandon.vt.us
 
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Brandon, Vermont
Town
Brandon, Vermont
Brandon, Vermont
CountryUnited States
StateVermont
CountyRutland
Area
 • Total40.2 sq mi (104.0 km2)
 • Land40.1 sq mi (103.9 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Population (2010)
 • Total3,966
 • Density99/sq mi (38/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code05733
Area code(s)802
Websitewww.town.brandon.vt.us

Brandon is a town in Rutland County, Vermont, United States. The population was 3,966 at the 2010 census.[1]

History[edit]

On October 20, 1761, the town of Neshobe was chartered to Capt. Josiah Powers. In October 1784, the name of the town was changed to Brandon by an act of legislature.[2]

Brandon is a study in early American architecture and Vermont history. When the first settlers came to the area in the mid-1770s, they established the village of Neshobe. The area was rich in natural resources with excellent farmland along the rivers and abundant supplies of timber and minerals. The town flourished during the 1800s with several industries relying on the key resources of waterpower, iron ore and marble. The coming of the railroad in 1849 enabled the manufacture and shipping of iron-based products such as the Howe scale, as well as Brandon paints, wood products and marble.

During its century of rapid growth, Brandon Village evolved a unique village plan. The historic Crown Point military road came through Brandon to connect Lake Champlain to the Atlantic coast. In the ensuing decades, government and individuals developed commercial streets at the core which radiated out from the greens lined with residences leading to farms, mines and quarries in the town. Pearl and Park streets were laid out to be suitable for militia training, resulting in broad, tree-shaded streets with deep front yards.

Statesman Stephen A. Douglas was born in Brandon, and his birthplace is now the Brandon Museum as well as the town’s Visitor Center.[3] Douglas returned in 1860 to inform a crowd that Brandon was a good place to be born and leave.[4]

Thomas Davenport, who is said to have invented the electric motor although he never achieved fame for his invention and died penniless, was born and lived in Brandon.

As the early industries began to decline, dairying, stockbreeding and tourism became increasingly important and ensured the economic survival of Brandon in the 20th century. The establishment of the Brandon Training School in 1915 was a significant event, providing many employment opportunities for area residents.[citation needed] At its height, the Training School served over 600 Vermont residents. Changes in policy and social service practices led to closing the facility in November 1993. The campus, now called Park Village, is used for a variety of purposes including residential, industrial, and institutional uses.

Brandon’s historic downtown with its entire core of 243 buildings is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Notable People[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town of Brandon has a total area of 40.2 square miles (104 km2), of which 40.1 square miles (104 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2), or 0.12%, is water.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 3,917 people, 1,572 households, and 1,097 families residing in the town. The population density was 97.6 people per square mile (37.7/km2). There were 1,710 housing units at an average density of 42.6 per square mile (16.5/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.85% White, 0.10% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.15% Asian, and 0.71% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.20% of the population.

There were 1,572 households out of which 31.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 23.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the town the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 90.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males.

Economy[edit]

Personal income[edit]

The median income for a household in the town was $35,810, and the median income for a family was $42,455. Males had a median income of $27,949 versus $22,576 for females. The per capita income for the town was $20,516. About 7.3% of families and 11.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.9% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over.

Tourism[edit]

While touring Brandon, Vermont you get to experience the beauty of nature. Recreation can be found just about anywhere you go. Experience the Moosalamoo National Recreation Area, one of Vermont’s best-kept secrets located in the heart of the 400,000 acre Green Mountain National Forest, stretching from the western slopes of the Green Mountains to Lake Dunmore. Hiking in the Moosalamoo National Recreation Area offers everything from wilderness solitude, to views of waterfalls, lakes, mountains and scenic vistas. By day, trace the footsteps of Robert Frost, and in the evening, enjoy a wonderful meal, later relax in front of the fireplace, or be tucked into a comfortable bed. There is exceptional biking in Brandon. Great trails for Mountain biking and hiking are in the Green Mountain National Forest.Ride through Pittsford’s covered bridges – a combination of gravel and paved roads pass over three covered bridges.Mountain biking sampler: The Ripton-Goshen Road is 8.5 miles of a moderate to easy gravel road (Forest Road #32) which traverses the high area between Goshen and Ripton with beautiful views. There are too many trails to mention but just to mention a few of the best: Falls of Lana, Silver Lake Interpretive Trail, Moosalamoo, Rattlesnake Cliffs, The Long Trail, Robert Frost Trail, Chittenden Brook, Texas Falls. A popular road biking sampler would look like: Ride to Fort Ticonderoga, out to High Pond Road and through Florence, and around Lake Dunmore. Visit Lake Dunmore and enjoy, swimming, camping, boating, kayaking, sandy-beached Branbury State Park, and fishing. Fishing on Lake Dunmore is like fishing in paradise, stocked with warm water species, lake trout and landlocked salmon. You can also, fish Silver Lake and Sugar Hill Reservoir, stocked with rainbow trout, browns, and brookies, both in the Green Mountain National Forest. According to Captain Nate Laskiewicz, a licensed captain and guide and founder of Vermont Lake Region Fishing Service, the Lake region of Vermont offers many choices of lakes to fish! You can make it happen on a large body of water, or the secluded lake or pond in the Green Mountains.Camping sites range from primitive forest sites to full service campgrounds with RV hook-ups.

Culture[edit]

Arts[edit]

The Arts in Brandon surround us, so much that the Governor called our town the “Art and Soul” of Vermont. Stop by and view the art of world famous Warren Kimble and +50 other talented artists at the Brandon Artist Guild in downtown Brandon. Two local wineries practicing the “art of the grape” have open wine tastings on a regular basis.There are folk artists, fabric artists, computer artists, workers in traditional decorative arts, watercolor, jewelry, pottery, glass, sculpture, print makers, and photographers.[citation needed] We also have many antique shops to browse through including:

Brandon’s Creative Economy is red hot! With so many artists, there are many studios and galleries open to the public. So check out Brandon and our surrounding area! More than 50 of the area’s talented artists exhibit and sell their works at the Brandon Artists Guild (affectionately called the BAG). Brandon has been called “the art and soul of Vermont” because of the work of these dynamic, vibrant, and varied artists belonging to the BAG. The exhibit space is open to the public 7 days a week throughout the entire year. No tour of Vermont’s galleries is complete without a visit to this very special community of artists whose reputations extend far beyond the borders of Vermont. These are the folks who brought community art projects to Brandon. Their shows have included: The Really Really Pig Show, Brandon Is For The Birds, Brandon Rocks, Its Reigning Cats & Dogs, Brandon: Thinking Outside the Box, Starring Brandon, Sunflowers! Food, Fuel, Fertilizer, Fun, and Art Makes Brandon Tick! Visit their website at: brandonartistsguild.org or call them at 802-247-4956.

Music[edit]

Music Events are held throughout the year at venues such as the Brandon Town Hall, Brandon Music, and outdoors in our parks in the summer. The biggest festival of its kind in Vermont is held in July each year, the Basin Bluegrass Festival. In summer on Fridays, make sure you stop by Farmer’s Market for the freshest products and crafts. Brandon has a few active farms which welcome guests. Get close to alpacas or goats or pick up farm fresh goodies from Wood’s Market Garden and nursery items at Pinewood Garden Center. We are surrounded by gracious countryside just outside of Brandon’s artistic downtown lies Brandon Music – Vermont’s classical music haven. Situated a the junction of Rte 73 East and Country Club Road, opposite the golf course, Brandon Music is the North American headquarters the international classical music record company, Divine Art Recordings Group. Located in a beautiful historic red barn, Brandon Music hosts the Divine Art CD Store with over 500 unique and fascinating classical and jazz titles, The Music Café serving lunches and afternoon teas, a Vermont art gallery, the bagatelles gift shop, and an exhibit of vintage phonographs. Regular live music too and lovely gardens to enjoy.

Events[edit]

Brandon is full of year round events.Brandon’s organizations sponsor enjoyable, educational, entertaining, and exciting events each year. There are several of events that occur with their own schedules along with annual events. Annual Events:

To find out more information on the annual events or discover what events are offered with their own schedules please visit-- Brandon.org and click on the events section.

Education[edit]

Brandon is home to Neshobe Elementary school (Pre-K to 6)[6] and Otter Valley Union High School (7-12).[7] Before the Union High School was constructed (1961) local students attended Brandon High School. Brandon High School was one of many high schools across the Nation that could not keep up with the times and as such needed to combine with other local high schools. However,high school students now attend Otter Valley Union High School. "Otter Valley Union High School is a place where reflective teaching and learning leads to high expectations for all students and creates enthusiasm for knowledge which encourages success in the global community." Otter Valley offers rigorous courses with many extracurricular activities including:

Our school systems are also lucky enough to have access to a phenomenal library. The library has computer workstations, free wifi, a photocopy and fax machine, DVD's and videos, access to the Vermont Online Library, and of course countless books to choose from! To find out more information on the library visit them at brandonpubliclibrary.org

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Race, Hispanic or Latino, Age, and Housing Occupancy: 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File (QT-PL), Brandon town, Vermont". U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder 2. Retrieved November 2, 2011. 
  2. ^ MacNabb Currier, 1914
  3. ^ http://www.stephenadouglas.org/birthplace.html
  4. ^ [1][dead link]
  5. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Neshobe School". Sites.google.com. Retrieved 2012-10-13. 
  7. ^ "OVUHS". OVUHS. Retrieved 2012-10-13. 

External links[edit]