Brady, Texas

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Brady, Texas
—  City  —
Nickname(s): The Heart of Texas
Location of Brady, Texas
Coordinates: 31°7′56″N 99°20′29″W / 31.13222°N 99.34139°W / 31.13222; -99.34139Coordinates: 31°7′56″N 99°20′29″W / 31.13222°N 99.34139°W / 31.13222; -99.34139
CountryUnited States
StateTexas
CountyMcCulloch
Area
 • Total11.5 sq mi (29.8 km2)
 • Land9.2 sq mi (23.8 km2)
 • Water2.3 sq mi (6.0 km2)
Elevation1,677 ft (511 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total5,523
 • Density601.1/sq mi (232.1/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code76825
Area code(s)325
FIPS code48-09916[1]
GNIS feature ID1352814[2]
 
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Brady, Texas
—  City  —
Nickname(s): The Heart of Texas
Location of Brady, Texas
Coordinates: 31°7′56″N 99°20′29″W / 31.13222°N 99.34139°W / 31.13222; -99.34139Coordinates: 31°7′56″N 99°20′29″W / 31.13222°N 99.34139°W / 31.13222; -99.34139
CountryUnited States
StateTexas
CountyMcCulloch
Area
 • Total11.5 sq mi (29.8 km2)
 • Land9.2 sq mi (23.8 km2)
 • Water2.3 sq mi (6.0 km2)
Elevation1,677 ft (511 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total5,523
 • Density601.1/sq mi (232.1/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code76825
Area code(s)325
FIPS code48-09916[1]
GNIS feature ID1352814[2]

Brady is a city in McCulloch County, Texas, United States. Brady refers to itself as "The Heart of Texas", as it is the closest city to the geographical center of the state. The population was 5,533 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of McCulloch County[3].

Contents

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Brady has a total area of 11.5 square miles (30 km2), of which, 9.2 square miles (24 km2) of it is land and 2.3 square miles (6.0 km2) of it (20.16%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 5,523 people, 2,181 households, and 1,448 families residing in the city. The population density was 601.1 people per square mile (232.0/km²). There were 2,603 housing units at an average density of 283.3 per square mile (109.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 59.6% White, 2.2% Black, 0.3% Native American, 0.4% Asian, .1% from other races, and .6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 36.7% of the population.

There were 2,181 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.6% were non-families. 31.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.4% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 23.5% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 19.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 85.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $22,961, and the median income for a family was $28,701. Males had a median income of $25,498 versus $17,289 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,607. About 18.7% of families and 23.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.7% of those under age 18 and 22.1% of those age 65 or over.

Notable residents

From 1957-1967, he was a fieldman and then research director for the Texas and American Hereford associations. He returned to Brady to enter the ranching business. In 1968, he began his long tenure at Commercial National Bank, having become president, CEO, and chairman of the board until his retirement in 2006. He was affiliated with both the Texas and American Bankers' associations. Jones chaired the First United Methodist Church board in Brady, the McCulloch County Easter Seals drive, and the Lower Colorado River Authority. He was a director of the National Cattleman's Association and a former president of the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association in Fort Worth. He was a former member of the Brady Independent School District trustees and the McCulloch Chamber of Commerce, which presented him with its "Lifetime Achievement Award".
Jones died in San Angelo at the Sagecrest Alzheimer's Care Center. Memorial services were held on December 17 at First Methodist. In addition to his wife, he was survived by two sons, Mark and Clay Jones, three grandchildren, and a brother, William L. "Billy" Jones, all of Brady.[4]

Education

Children in Brady attend Brady ISD schools. There are approximately 1,300 students attending Brady ISD. Brady Elementary consists of grades K-5 and the principal is Kelley Hirt. Brady Middle School consists of grades 6-8. Brady High School consists of grades 9-12 with Hector Martinez as principal. Anne Moore serves as Superintendent.

Brady High School is a TEA Recognized campus.

The Board of Trustees

President

Jason Jacoby

1st. Vice-President

2nd. Vice-President

Secretary

Member

Member

Member

Government and infrastructure

In 1947 the State of Texas opened the Brady State School for Negro Girls in a former prisoner of war camp in McCulloch County, near Brady, on a former prisoner of war camp leased from the Federal Government of the United States. In 1950 the state replaced the Brady facility with the Crockett State School.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. ^ John W. Jones obituary, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, December 15, 2008: http://lubbockonline.com/stories/121508/obi_367676295.shtml
  5. ^ "Crockett State School." Handbook of Texas Online. Retrieved on August 8, 2010.

External links