Books of the Latin Vulgate

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These are the books of the Latin Vulgate along with the names and numbers given them in the Douay Rheims Bible and King James Bible. There are 76 books in the Clementine edition of the Latin Vulgate, 46 in the Old Testament, 27 in the New Testament, and 3 in the Apocrypha.

Contents

Old Testament

VulgateDouay RheimsKing James Bible
Vetus Testamentum
GenesisGenesisGenesis
ExodusExodusExodus
LeviticusLeviticusLeviticus
NumeriNumbersNumbers
DeuteronomiumDeuteronomyDeuteronomy
JosueJosueJoshua
JudicesJudgesJudges
RuthRuthRuth
1 Samuelis also known as 1 Regum1 Kings1 Samuel
2 Samuelis also known as 2 Regum2 Kings2 Samuel
3 Regum3 Kings1 Kings
4 Regum4 Kings2 Kings
1 Paralipomenon1 Paralipomenon1 Chronicles
2 Paralipomenon2 Paralipomenon2 Chronicles
1 Esdræ1 EsdrasEzra
Nehemiæ also known as 2 Esdræ2 EsdrasNehemiah
TobiæTobiasTobit
JudithJudithJudith
EstherEstherEsther and the Rest of Esther
JobJobJob
PsalmiPsalmsPsalms
ProverbiaSentences Listed as Proverbs in the Challoner Revision of the Douay-Rheims.Proverbs
EcclesiastesEcclesiastesEcclesiastes
Canticum CanticorumCanticle of CanticlesSong of Solomon
SapientiæWisdomWisdom
EcclesiasticusEcclesiasticusEcclesiasticus
IsaiæIsaiasIsaiah
JeremiæJeremiasJeremiah
LamentationesLamentationsLamentations
BaruchBaruchBaruch and the Epistle of Jeremy
EzechielisEzechielEzekiel
DanielisDanielDaniel, Song of the Three Children, Story of Susanna, and The Idol Bel and the Dragon
OseeOseeHosea
JoelJoelJoel
AmosAmosAmos
AbdiæAbdiasObadiah
JonæJonasJonah
MichææMichæasMicah
NahumNahumNahum
HabacucHabacucHabakkuk
SophoniaeSophoniasZephaniah
AggæiAggæusHaggai
ZachariæZachariasZechariah
MalachiæMalachiasMalachi
1 Machabæorum1 Machabees1 Maccabees
2 Machabæorum2 Machabees2 Maccabees

New Testament

VulgateDouay RheimsKing James Bible
Novum Testamentum
secundum MatthæumMatthewMatthew
secundum MarcumMarkMark
secundum LucamLukeLuke
secundum IoannemJohnJohn
ActusActsActs
ad RomanosRomansRomans
1 ad Corinthios1 Corinthians1 Corinthians
2 ad Corinthios2 Corinthians2 Corinthians
ad GalatasGalatiansGalatians
ad EphesiosEphesiansEphesians
ad PhilippensesPhilippiansPhilippians
ad ColossensesColossiansColossians
1 ad Thessalonicenses1 Thessalonians1 Thessalonians
2 ad Thessalonicenses2 Thessalonians2 Thessalonians
1 ad Timotheum1 Timothy1 Timothy
2 ad Timotheum2 Timothy2 Timothy
ad TitumTitusTitus
ad PhilemonemPhilemonPhilemon
ad HebræosHebrewsHebrews
JacobiJamesJames
1 Petri1 Peter1 Peter
2 Petri2 Peter2 Peter
1 Ioannis1 John1 John
2 Ioannis2 John2 John
3 Ioannis3 John3 John
JudæJudeJude
ApocalypsisApocalypseRevelation

Apocrypha

VulgateDouay RheimsKing James Bible
Apocrypha
Oratio Manassæ regisPrayer of ManassesPrayer of Manasses
3 Esdræ3 Esdras1 Esdras
4 Esdræ4 Esdras2 Esdras

Notes

The names and numbers of the books of the Latin Vulgate differ in ways that may be confusing to many modern Bible readers. In addition, some of the books of the Vulgate have content that has been removed to separate books entirely in many modern Bible translations. This list is an aid to tracking down the content of a Vulgate reference.

The Psalms of the Vulgate follow the numbering assigned to them in the Septuagint which differs from the numbering found in the King James Bible, though not in the order nor the content. See Psalms for more details.

Note that the Apocrypha and Old Testament divisions of the Vulgate do not exactly correspond to those sections in the King James Bible. The Vulgate's Apocrypha section is smaller than the King James Bible's, with a correspondingly larger Old Testament. See the article on the Biblical canon for details as to why this is so. The names of those books found in the Apocrypha section of their respective versions are in italics.

A complement to this list can be found at List of books of the Authorized King James Version.

Other Editions

The list is for the Clementine Vulgate. Other editions of the Vulgate vary in the Apocrypha, in the order of the books, and in the names of the books.

Early Manuscripts

The early Vulgate manuscripts essentially had a table of contents identical to those found in modern Vulgate editions.

Sequence of Books in Vulgate Old Testaments

Jerome IVAugustine VAmiatinus VIITheodulf IXAlcuin IXParis XIIIClementine XVI
OctOctOctOctOctOctOct
KgsKgsKgsKgsKgsKgsKgs
IsChronChronIsIsChron + PMChron
JerJobPssJer + BarJerEzr + NEzr + N
EzekTobProvEzekEzekEsdrTob
Min PrEstWisdMin PrDanTobJdth
JobJdthSirJobMin PrJdthEst
PssMaccEcclPssJobEstJob
ProvEzr + NSongProvPssJobPss
EcclPssIsEcclProvPssProv
SongProvJerSongEcclProvEccl
DanSongEzekDanSongEcclSong
ChronEcclDanChronWisdSongWisd
Ezr + NWisdMin PrEzr + NSirWisdSir
EstSirJobEstChronSirIs
WisdMin PrTobWisdEzr + NIsJer + Bar
SirIsEstSirEstJer + BarEzek
JdthJerJdthTobTobEzekDan
TobDanEzr + NJdthJdthDanMin Pr
MaccEzekMaccMaccMaccMin PrMacc
Macc

Adapted from Richard Marsden "The Text of the Old Testament in Anglo-Saxon England" page 450.

In the Old Testament sequence set out by Jerome in the Prologus galeatus, he identifies the books into four categories; The Law (the five books of Moses); the Prophets (including Joshua, Judges and Kings; as well as the major and minor prophets); the Writings (including both Poetical and Wisdom books as well as narrative books); and finally the five apocryphal books of Wisdom, Ecclesiasticus, Judith, Tobit and Maccabees. Jerome's first three categories correspond to the rabbinic ordering of the Hebrew Bible, except that Jerome includes Ruth with Judges, and Lamentations with Jeremiah. Although the prologus, and hence Jerome's listing, was included in almost all Vulgate pandect manuscripts, his order was only rarely adopted; the exceptions being the bibles produced by Theodulf and his successors at Fleury, and also the 9th century Codex Toletanus in Spain. An alternative listing of the Old Testament books, which circulated universally in the Latin west, was that set out by Augustine (On Christian Doctrine II, viii, 13). Augustine allocates the Old Testament into five categories; The Law (as in Jerome); the History (including the books of Chronicles); the Narratives (including Tobit, Judith and Maccabees from the apocryphal books); the books of David and Solomon (including the apocryphal books of Wisdom and Ecclesiasticus); and the Prophets (including Daniel with the major prophets). Although Augustine's detailed order of books has not been recorded in any manuscript, most subsequent pandects recognised his categories. The Codex Amiatinus sets out the Old Testament in the order; Law, History, David and Solomon, Prophets, Narratives. Alcuin gives the order; Law, History, Prophets, David and Solomon, Narratives; but removes Job from the Narrative section to a position immediately preceding the Book of Psalms, and also includes Chronicles with the Narratives (in both cases returning to Jerome's order). Augustine's categories are also found in the decees of the Council of Carthage, at which Augustine was present, in the order; Law, History, David and Solomon (including Job), Prophets, Narratives; and this order is also found the 8th century Codex Cavensis and other Spanish pandect bibles. The Paris bibles followed the sequence; Law, History, Narratives (now including 3 Esdras), David and Solomon, Prophets (now including Baruch with Jeremiah); with Maccabees relocated to be the final book. The Paris order, minus 3 Esdras, was eventually to be adopted by the Clementine Vulgate.

External links