Boaz and Jachin

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Image of a 3rd-century glass bowl which depicts Solomon's Temple. Jachin and Boaz are the detached black pillars shown on either side of the entrance steps.
Artist's impression.

Boaz and Jachin were two copper, brass or bronze pillars which stood in the porch of Solomon's Temple, the first Temple in Jerusalem.[1]

Description[edit]

Boaz stood on the left and Jachin ("founding", Tiberian Hebrew יָכִין Yāḵîn) stood on the right. The pillars had a size nearly six feet (1.8 metres) thick and 27 feet (8.2 metres) tall. The eight-foot (2.4 metres) high brass chapiters or capitals on top of the columns bore decorations of brass lilies.

The original measurement as taken from the Bible was in cubits, which records that the pillars 18 cubits high and 12 cubits around, and hollow, four fingers thick. (Jeremiah 52:21–22). Nets of checkerwork covered the bowl of each chapiter, decorated with rows of 200 pomegranates, wreathed with seven chains for each chapiter, and topped with lilies (1 Kings 7:13–22, 41–42).

Replicas[edit]

The Romanesque Church of Santa Maria Maggiore at Tuscania has a recessed entrance flanked by a pair of free-standing stone columns intended to evoke Boaz and Jachin.[2]

In popular media[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ See (1 Kings 7:15, 1 Kings 7:21; 2 Kings 11:14; 23:3).
  2. ^ Hamblin, William J. and Seeely, David Rolph, Solomon's Temple; Myth and History, Thames and Hudson, 2007, p. 109
  3. ^ McCarthy, Cormac. Blood Meridian. p. 94, Vintage paperback.
  4. ^ The Lion of Boaz-Jachin and Jachin-Boaz.
  5. ^ Resolution on Jakin centennial, Georgia House of Representatives.

External links[edit]