Blepharoplasty

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Blepharoplasty
Intervention
ICD-9-CM08
MeSHD019882
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Upper eyelid blepharoplasty: The blue-ink delineated surgical plan, and the incisions made to correct a defect of the patient′s upper eyelid.
Blepharoplasty
Intervention
ICD-9-CM08
MeSHD019882
Illustration depicting incision lines for blepharoplasty

Blepharoplasty (Greek: blepheron, “eyelid” + plassein “to form”) is the plastic surgery operation for correcting defects, deformities, and disfigurations of the eyelids; and for aesthetically modifying the eye region of the face. With the excision and the removal, or the repositioning (or both) of excess tissues, such as skin and adipocyte fat, and the reinforcement of the corresponding muscle and tendon tissues, the blepharoplasty procedure resolves functional and cosmetic problems of the periorbita, which is the area from the eyebrow to the upper portion of the cheek.

The operative goals of a blepharoplastic procedure are the restoration of the correct functioning to the affected eyelid(s), and the restoration of the aesthetics of the eye-region of the face, which are achieved by eliminating excess skin from the eyelid(s), smoothing the underlying eye muscles, tightening the supporting structures, and resecting and re-draping the excess fat of the retroseptal area of the eye, in order to produce a smooth anatomic transition from the lower eyelid to the cheek.

In an eye surgery procedure, the usual correction or modification (or both) is of the upper and the lower eyelids, and of the surrounding tissues of the eyebrows, the upper nasal-bridge area, and the upper portions of the cheeks, which are achieved by modifying the periosteal coverings of the facial bones that form the orbit (eye socket). The periosteum comprises two-layer connective tissues that cover the bones of the human body: (i) the external layer of networks of dense, connective tissues with blood vessels, and (ii) the internal, deep layer of collagenous bundles composed of spindle-shaped cells of connective tissue, and a network of thin, elastic fibres.

Indications[edit]

Transconjunctival blepharoplasty: The removal of orbital fat for the cosmetic modification of the lower eyelid.[broken citation][1]

The thorough pre-operative medical and surgical histories, and the physical examination of the patient’s periorbital area (eyebrow-to-cheek-to-nose), determine if the patient can safely undergo a blepharoplasty procedure to feasibly resolve (correct or modify, or both) the functional and aesthetic indications presented by the patient. Sequentially, lower eyelid blepharoplasty can successfully address the anatomic matters of excess eyelid skin, slackness of the eye-muscles and of the orbital septum (palpebral ligament), excess orbital fat, malposition of the lower eyelid, and prominence of the nasojugal groove, where the orbit (eye socket) meets the slope of the nose.[medical citation needed]

Concerning the upper eyelid, a blepharoplasty procedure can resolve the loss of peripheral vision, caused by the slackness of the upper-eyelid skin draping over the eyelashes; the outer and the upper portions of the field of vision of the patient are affected, and cause him or her difficulty in performing mundane activities such as driving an automobile and reading a book.[2]

Procedures[edit]

Blepharoplasty: The yellow fat (adipocyte tissue) and the skin (linear tissue) removed during a quadruple blepharoplasty. The fat from the lower eyelid was removed with a transconjunctival technique.

A blepharoplasty procedure usually is performed through external surgical incisions made along the natural skin lines (creases) of the upper and the lower eyelids, which creases then hide the surgical scars from view, especially when effected in the skin creases below the eyelashes of the lower eyelid. According to the technique applied by the plastic surgeon, the incisions can be made from the conjunctiva, the interior surface of the lower eyelid, as in the case of a transconjunctival blepharoplasty. Such a technique permits the excision (cutting and removal) of the lower-eyelid adipocyte fat without leaving a visible scar, but, the transconjunctival blepharoplasty technique does not allow the removal of excess eyelid-skin.[2]

A blepharoplasty operation usually requires 1.0–3.0 hours to complete. Post-operatively, the initial swelling and bruising consequent to the surgery will subside and resolve with 1–2 weeks; the final, stable results of the blepharoplastic correction will become apparent after several months. The results of a blepharoplasty procedure are best appreciated by comparing pre- and post-operative (before-and-after) photographs of the eye region of the patient.[medical citation needed]

The anatomic condition of the eyelids, the (wear-and-tear) quality of the patient’s skin, his or her age, and the general condition of the adjacent tissues, consequent to the anatomic conditions of the patient, affect the functional and aesthetic results achieved with the eyelid surgery. Additional to the anatomic conditions of the eye region of the patient, the occurrence, or not, of medical complications is determined by factors such as:[medical citation needed]

Transconjunctival blepharoplasty of the right lower eyelid.
Fat is removed from the lower eyelid by means of an incision to the inner surface of the eyelid. A surgical suture retains the inner tissue of the eyelid over the eyeball. 
The fat is held with forceps (left), and clamped with a hemostat (right), while a small medical retractor keeps away the extra tissue, so that the surgeon can operate. (bottom right). 
The fat is excised (cut away) with surgical scissors. gallery 

Asian blepharoplasty (double eyelid surgery) is a blepharoplasty procedure used to create a supratarsal epicanthic fold in the upper eyelid of the patient who lacks such a crease.[3] The supratarsal epicanthic fold is common to most ethnic groups, but is absent in approximately half of the Asian population.[medical citation needed]

History[edit]

Initial incision along the upper left eyelid

Karl Ferdinand von Gräfe coined the phrase blepharoplasty in 1818 when the technique was used for repairing deformities caused by cancer in the eyelids.[medical citation needed]

As techniques began developing the ancient Greeks and Romans began writing down and collecting everything they knew involving these procedures. Aulus Cornelius Celsus, a first-century Roman, described making an excision in the skin to relax the eyelids in his book De Medicine.[4]

Laser[edit]

Laser blepharoplasty is the performance of eyelid surgery using a laser instead of a scalpel. Laser blepharoplasty is often combined with laser eyelid rejuvenation, as the two procedures can be performed in conjunction.

Historically there has been some contention as to the categorisation of laser treatment on upper or lower eyelids as blepharoplasty, which is itself by definition surgical. The statutory definition of surgery and that supported by the American College of Surgeons states that surgery is the "treatment ... by any instrument causing localized alteration or transportation of live human tissue, which include lasers.." .[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [broken citation]Kami Parsa, MD
  2. ^ a b Pan, Brian S. Blepharoplasty, Lower Lid Subciliary (2006). http://www.emedicine.com/plastic/topic4.htm
  3. ^ McCurdy Jr, JA (2005). "Upper blepharoplasty in the Asian patient: the "double eyelid" operation". Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America 13 (1): 47–64. doi:10.1016/j.fsc.2004.07.001. PMID 15519927. 
  4. ^ Cecilia Tran, Preoperative Considerations in Blepharoplasty, Baylor College of Medicine, 25 September 2006, http://www.bmc.edu/oto/grand/04_22_04.htm
  5. ^ Grill, C, 'Defining surgery' Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons, May 2012, http://www.facs.org/fellows_info/bulletin/2012/grill0512.pdf