Black Brothers

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Black Brothers was a well-known West Papuan pop group from Jayapura.[1][2] The band consisted of five members,[3] led by Andy Ayamiseba.[4] Their music, sung in Tok Pisin, included influences from reggae and political elements inspired by the Black Power movement.[3][5] The group went into voluntary exile in Vanuata in 1979, protesting Indonesian policies in West Papua. They later moved to Papua New Guinea.[1]

Black Brothers were the most popular musical group in New Guinea during the 1980s.[3] The reggae influences of the Black Brothers influenced various other musical groups in Papua New Guinea.[5]

There was another group titled 'Black Brothers' in New Caledonia, which was associated with the Kanak independence movement.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lockard, Craig A. Dance of Life Popular Music and Politics in Southeast Asia. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaiʻi Press, 1998. p. 105
  2. ^ Pickell, David, and Kal Muller. Between the Tides: An Fascinating Journey Among the Kamoro of New Guinea. Singapore: Periplus, 2002. p. 225
  3. ^ a b c Gronow, Pekka, and Ilpo Saunio. An international history of the recording industry. London: Cassell, 1999. p. 184
  4. ^ Banoe, Pono. Kamus musik. Deresan, Yogyakarta: Penerbit Kanisius, 2003. p.
  5. ^ a b Hayward, Philip. Sound Alliances: Indigenous Peoples, Cultural Politics, and Popular Music in the Pacific. London: Cassell, 1998. p. 109
  6. ^ Hayward, Philip. Sound Alliances: Indigenous Peoples, Cultural Politics, and Popular Music in the Pacific. London: Cassell, 1998. pp. 50, 60