Bicol Region

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Bicol Region
Region V
—  Region  —
Map of the Philippines showing the location of Bicol Region
CountryPhilippines
Island groupLuzon
Regional centerLegazpi City
Area
 • Total18,054.3 km2 (6,970.8 sq mi)
Population (2010)
 • Total5,420,411[1]
Time zonePST (UTC+8)
Provinces6
Cities7
Municipalities107
Barangays3,471
Cong. districts14
LanguagesBikol, Albayano, Masbateño, Rinconada, Pandan Bikol, Sorsoganon, Tagalog
WebsiteBicol Region Official Website
 
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Bicol Region
Region V
—  Region  —
Map of the Philippines showing the location of Bicol Region
CountryPhilippines
Island groupLuzon
Regional centerLegazpi City
Area
 • Total18,054.3 km2 (6,970.8 sq mi)
Population (2010)
 • Total5,420,411[1]
Time zonePST (UTC+8)
Provinces6
Cities7
Municipalities107
Barangays3,471
Cong. districts14
LanguagesBikol, Albayano, Masbateño, Rinconada, Pandan Bikol, Sorsoganon, Tagalog
WebsiteBicol Region Official Website

Coordinates: 13°30′N 123°20′E / 13.5°N 123.333°E / 13.5; 123.333 The Bicol Region or Region V (also known as Bicolandia) is one of the 17 regions of the Philippines. Bicol (also spelled Bikol) is composed of four provinces in the Bicol Peninsula, the southeastern end of Luzon island, and two island-provinces adjacent to the peninsula.[2] Its regional center is Legazpi City in Albay province.[3][4]

Contents

Geography

The Bicol Region is located in the southernmost tip of Luzon Island, the largest island in the Philippine archipelago. The total land area of the region is 18,054.3 km2 (6,970.8 sq mi)[5], which or 5.9% of the total land area of the country. Around 69.3% of the total land area is alienable and disposable while the remaining 30.7% is public forest areas.[2]

The region is bounded by Lamon Bay to the north, Pacific Ocean to the east, and Sibuyan Sea and Ragay Gulf to the west. The northernmost province, Camarines Norte, is bordered to the north by the province of Quezon, thereby connecting the region to the rest of Luzon.

Political division

Political map of Bicol Region

The region is composed of six provinces, namely, Albay, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Sorsogon and the island-provinces of Catanduanes and Masbate. It has one independent component city, Naga City, and six component cities - Iriga, Legazpi, Tabacco City,Ligao, Masbate City, Sorsogon City, and Tabaco. Masbate City and Sorsogon City are cities within their namesake provinces.

As of 2010, Camarines Sur is the largest province in terms of area and population, occupying 5,481.6 km2 (2,116.5 sq mi) or around 30.4% of the total land area with a population of 1,822,371. Catanduanes is the smallest in terms of area as well as population with only 1,511.5 km2 (583.6 sq mi) or 8.4% of the total regional area and a population of 246,300.[1]

The political and administrative center of the region is Legazpi City.[2] Together with Naga and Sorsogon Cities, they are leading in the region in terms of urbanization and hubs of the economic activity, as well as the cultural, business and religious centers of the region.


ProvincesCapitalNo. of
Cities
No. of
Municipalities
No. of
Barangays
Income classification
(2007)[6]
Area
(km²)
Population
(2010)[1]
ZIP CodeGovernor
Vlag Fil Albay.gifPh seal albay.pngAlbay
Legazpi City
3
15
720
1st Class
2,552.60[7]
1,233,432
4500-4517
Joey Salceda
Vlag Fil CamarinesNorte.gifPh seal camarines norte.pngCamarines Norte
Daet
0
12
282
2nd Class
2,320.07[8]
542,915
4600-4612
Edgardo Tallado
Vlag Fil CamarinesSur.gifPh seal camarines sur.pngCamarines Sur
Pili
2
35
1063
1st Class
5,481.60[9]
1,822,371
4400-4436
Luis Raymund Villafuerte, Jr.
Vlag Fil Catanduanes.gifPh seal catanduanes.pngCatanduanes
Virac
0
11
315
3rd Class
1,511.50[10]
246,300
4800-4810
Joseph Cua
Vlag Fil Masbate.gifPh seal masbate.pngMasbate
Masbate City
1
20
550
1st Class
4,047.07[11]
834,650
5400-5421
Rizalina L. Seachon-Lañete
Vlag Fil Sorsogon.gifSorsogon provincial seal.pngSorsogon
Sorsogon City
1
14
541
2nd Class
2,141.45[12]
740,743
4700-4715
Raul Lee

Geology

Bicol Region is volcanic in origin and part of the Pacific Ring of Fire. Known as the Bicol Volcanic Arc or Chain, the volcanoes are the results of the Philippine Sea Plate subducting under the Philippine Mobile Belt, along the Philippine Trench. Volcanism is evident by the number of hot springs, crater lakes, and volcanoes that dot the region starting from Mount Labo in Camarines Norte to the Gate Mountains in Matnog, Sorsogon.[13] Mayon Volcano is the most prominent of the volcanoes in the region, famous for its almost perfect conical shape and for being the most active in the Philippines. Its eruptions have repeatedly inflicted disasters on the region, but during lulls in activity, it is a particularly beautiful mountain. The southernmost tip of the peninsula is dominated by Bulusan Volcano, the other active volcano in the region. Tiwi in Albay and the Bacon-Manito area between Sorsogon and Albay are the sites of two major geothermal fields that contribute substantially to the Luzon Power Grid.[14][15]

Volcanoes of the Bicol Region

From North to South

PhotoName
Philippines 2006 338.jpgMount Isarog, the closest to Naga City, is a 1,966-metre (6,450 ft) fumarolic volcano with a 2.5-kilometre (1.6 mi) wide crater breached to the east.[16] The mountain and vicinity covering 10,112 hectares (24,990 acres) is a protected area in the Bicol Region under the name Mount Isarog Natural Park.[17]
Mount Iriga.jpgMount Iriga is a 1,196-metre (3,924 ft) volcano with a large horseshoe-shaped collapsed crater located adjacent to Lake Buhi (foreground).[18]
Mount Malinao.jpgMount Malinao is a 1,548-metre (5,079 ft) volcano with a large crater about {{convert|3|km| at its widest, which is breached to the east, The geothermal fields of Tiwi are located on its lower eastern slope.[19]
Masaraga.jpgMount Masaraga is a sharp-topped 1,328-metre (4,357 ft) Holocene volcano NW of Mayon.[20]
Mayon 0006.jpgMayon Volcano, the highest at 1,196 metres (3,924 ft), is also the most popular in the region for its beautifully symmetrical cone. It is also the most active in the country.[21] The volcano is one of the protected areas of Region V under the name Mayon Volcano Natural Park encompassing 5,776 hectares (14,270 acres).[17]
Pocdolberge.jpgPocdol Mountains with its highest elevation at 1,102 metres (3,615 ft), is a fumarolic group of volcanoes situated between Albay and Sorsogon provinces. It is the location of the Bac-Man Geothermal Power Plant and the PNOC Eco-Park, a 25,100-hectare (62,000-acre) ecotourism park maintained and protected by the Philippine National Oil Company (PNOC).[22][23]
Mt-Bulusan.jpgBulusan Volcano, the other active volcano of the region, has an altitude of 1,565 metres (5,135 ft). It is located on the remains of the 11-kilometre (6.8 mi) Irosin Caldera.[24] The volcano is a protected area and the centerpiece of the 3,672-hectare (9,070-acre) Bulusan Volcano Natural Park.[17]

Language

The people of the Bicol region, called Bicolanos, speak any of the several languages of the Bikol sociolinguistic language, also called Bikolano, an Austronesian language closely related to other Central Philippine languages such as Cebuano and Tagalog. Bicol languages include the Inland Bikol of Bikol-Rinconada (Rinconada area), Bikol-Cam. Sur (Buhi, Cam. Sur; Libon, Oas, Daraga, Albay and Donsol, Sorsogon), Bikol-Pandan (Northern Catanduanes). Standard Bikol is based from the coastal Bikol language of the dialect of Naga City and is understood widely throughout the region even though they cannot speak it fluently.

Bikol is the dominant language of the region. The Filipino language (Tagalog) is also spoken in northern parts of Camarines Norte as well as in the municipality of Del Gallego, Camarines Sur. Two Visayan languages, Sorsoganon and Masbateño or Minasbate, are spoken in Masbate and Sorsogon; they are collectively referred to as Bisakol.

Religion

Celebration of Our Lady of Peñafrancia

The region retains Roman Catholicism as the overwhelming religion of the great majority. The Catholic religion has the highest number of followers than any other area in the Philippines.

Fiestas (Feast day of saints) are annual celebrations of parishes, from a simple barrio fiesta honoring a patron associated for good harvest, to a town fiesta honoring a miraculous saint, a diocesan fiesta like the feast of Our Lady of Salvation, or a regional one such as the Our Lady of Peñafrancia Fiesta, a week-long celebration to honor the Virgin Mary, dubbed as the "Queen Patroness of Bicolandia". It is widely acknowledged that in Luzon, it is Bicol Region that holds the most number of men entering the seminary for Catholic priesthood, or women entering the religious life to become Catholic nuns.[citation needed]

Archaeology

Albay's archaeology shows concrete evidence of trade with China, Malaya and Indonesia going back two thousand years. The first Spanish contact was in 1565, when a treasure-galleon returning to Cebu from Acapulco, Mexico, was swept off course and the captain recorded his awe at the sight of Mt. Mayon erupting.[citation needed]

Economy

Bicol Region has a large amount of rich flat land, and agriculture is the largest component of the economy with close to 50% depending their livelihood on the industry. Coconuts, abaca, banana, coffee and jackfruit are the top five permanent crops in the region. Rice and maize are among the chief seasonal crops of the region. Commercial fishing is also important with thirteen major fishing grounds supplying fish markets in places as far as Metro Manila. Agriculture and fishing are the major factors in the province's economy.[2][25]

Mining is also one of the contributors to the region's economy. Several handicrafts, jewelry manufacturing, other small-scale industries and manufacturing enterprises bolster rural incomes.

Tourism

Whale shark spotting in Donsol, Sorsogon

The region has recently seen a revival in its tourism industry, due to the popularity of Mayon Volcano, the new CamSur Water Sports Complex, whale shark spotting, among others, which consequently increased the number of upscale resorts in the region.

Owing to its location, Region V offers plenty of choices for visitors - beautiful natural features like beaches, mountains and waterfalls with lush vegetation; activities could include scuba diving to wrecked galleons, spelunking, mountaineering; or visits to man-made attractions like church architecture from the Spanish Colonial Period; etc.

The municipality of Daet and Catanduanes province have long been destinations for surfers.[26] The opening of the Southern Luzon International Airport in Legazpi City, which is under construction, is hoped to further boost tourism in the region.

Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b c "2010 Census of Population and Housing - Region 5". National Statistics Office, Philippines. Retrieved on 2012-05-11.
  2. ^ a b c d "Overview of Bicol Region". Department of Agriculture Web Site. Retrieved on 2012-05-22.
  3. ^ "DILG Regional Office No. 5 Directory". Bicol Region Official Website - DILG. Retrieved on 2012-05-22.
  4. ^ http://bicol.da.gov.ph/Statistics/regional_profile.html
  5. ^ The total land area is derived from the summation of provincial areas from the table below
  6. ^ "Bicol Region". Philippine Standard Geographic Code. Retrieved on 2012-05-11.
  7. ^ "Basic Facts and Figures - Albay". Department of Interior and Local Government (Philippines)/ Retrieved on 2012-05-11.
  8. ^ "Basic Facts and Figures - Camarines Norte". Department of Interior and Local Government (Philippines)/ Retrieved on 2012-05-11.
  9. ^ "Basic Facts and Figures - Camarines Sur". Department of Interior and Local Government (Philippines)/ Retrieved on 2012-05-11.
  10. ^ "Basic Facts and Figures - Catanduanes". Department of Interior and Local Government (Philippines)/ Retrieved on 2012-05-11.
  11. ^ "Basic Facts and Figures - Masbate". Department of Interior and Local Government (Philippines)/ Retrieved on 2012-05-11.
  12. ^ "Basic Facts and Figures - Sorsogon". Department of Interior and Local Government (Philippines)/ Retrieved on 2012-05-11.
  13. ^ McDermott, Delfin, Defant, et al (2005). "The Petrogenesis of Volcanics from Mt Bulusan and Mt. Mayon in the Bicol Arc, Philippines". University College Dublin School of Geologic Sciences. Retrieved on 2012-05-22.
  14. ^ "Our Geothermal Projects". Energy Development Corporation. Retrieved on 2011-08-01.
  15. ^ (2009-01-20). "The Tiwi Geothermal Plant". JCMiras.net Gallery. Retrieved on 2011-08-01.
  16. ^ "Isarog". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0703-042. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  17. ^ a b c "Protected areas of Region 5". Bureau of Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau. Retrieved on 2012-05-22.
  18. ^ "Iriga". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0703-041. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  19. ^ "Malinao". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=070304=A. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  20. ^ "Masaraga". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0703-031. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  21. ^ "Mayon". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0703-03=. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  22. ^ "Pocdol Mountains". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0703-02=. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  23. ^ Jamoralin, Reynaldo T.. "Places of Interest". Sorsogon Tourism. Retrieved on 2012-05-22.
  24. ^ "Bulusan". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0703-01=. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  25. ^ "Top 5 Permanent Crops, Region V". Department of Agriculture, Region V. Retrieved on 2011-08-01.
  26. ^ "Catanduanes surfing". Philippines Travel Guide. Retrieved on 2011-08-01.

External links