Bernards Township, New Jersey

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Bernards Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Bernards
Lyons Train Station in Bernards Township
Map of Bernards Township in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bernards Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°40′36″N 74°34′05″W / 40.676573°N 74.567956°W / 40.676573; -74.567956Coordinates: 40°40′36″N 74°34′05″W / 40.676573°N 74.567956°W / 40.676573; -74.567956[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountySomerset
Royal charter1760
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Government[7]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorCarolyn Gaziano (term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4]
 • AdministratorBruce McArthur[5]
 • ClerkDenise Szabo[6]
Area[2]
 • Total24.061 sq mi (62.317 km2)
 • Land23.934 sq mi (61.988 km2)
 • Water0.127 sq mi (0.330 km2)  0.53%
Area rank116th of 566 in state
6th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[8]249 ft (76 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total26,652
 • Estimate (2012[12])26,833
 • Rank90th of 566 in state
4th of 21 in county[13]
 • Density1,113.6/sq mi (430.0/km2)
 • Density rank369th of 566 in state
10th of 21 in county[13]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07920, 07939 - Basking Ridge[14]
07938 - Liberty Corner[15]
07939 - Lyons[16]
07931 - Far Hills[17][18]
Area code(s)908
FIPS code3403505560[19][2][20]
GNIS feature ID0882174[21][2]
Websitewww.bernards.org
 
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Bernards Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Bernards
Lyons Train Station in Bernards Township
Map of Bernards Township in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bernards Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°40′36″N 74°34′05″W / 40.676573°N 74.567956°W / 40.676573; -74.567956Coordinates: 40°40′36″N 74°34′05″W / 40.676573°N 74.567956°W / 40.676573; -74.567956[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountySomerset
Royal charter1760
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Government[7]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorCarolyn Gaziano (term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4]
 • AdministratorBruce McArthur[5]
 • ClerkDenise Szabo[6]
Area[2]
 • Total24.061 sq mi (62.317 km2)
 • Land23.934 sq mi (61.988 km2)
 • Water0.127 sq mi (0.330 km2)  0.53%
Area rank116th of 566 in state
6th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[8]249 ft (76 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total26,652
 • Estimate (2012[12])26,833
 • Rank90th of 566 in state
4th of 21 in county[13]
 • Density1,113.6/sq mi (430.0/km2)
 • Density rank369th of 566 in state
10th of 21 in county[13]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07920, 07939 - Basking Ridge[14]
07938 - Liberty Corner[15]
07939 - Lyons[16]
07931 - Far Hills[17][18]
Area code(s)908
FIPS code3403505560[19][2][20]
GNIS feature ID0882174[21][2]
Websitewww.bernards.org
Aerial view of western portion of Bernards Township

Bernards Township /ˈbɜrnərdz/ is a township in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. At the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 26,652,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 2,077 (+8.5%) from the 24,575 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 7,376 (+42.9%) from the 17,199 counted in the 1990 Census.[22]

Basking Ridge, Liberty Corner, Lyons and West Millington are ZIP codes and unincorporated communities located within Bernards Township.[23] Martinsville is an unincorporated area in Bridgewater Township, whose 08836 ZIP code also covers portions of Bernards Township.

Geography[edit]

Bernards Township is located at 40°40′36″N 74°34′05″W / 40.676573°N 74.567956°W / 40.676573; -74.567956 (40.676573,-74.567956). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 24.061 square miles (62.317 km2), of which, 23.934 square miles (61.988 km2) of it was land and 0.127 square miles (0.330 km2) of it (0.53%) was water.[1][2]

The township is roughly bounded by the Second Watchung Mountain in the southwest, the Dead River swamp on the south, the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Passaic River, and Millington Gorge in the East.

History[edit]

Bernards Township was originally formed by Royal charter in 1760 as Bernardston Township from remaining portions of Northern precinct.[24] It was incorporated as Bernards Township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 township. Portions of the township were taken to form Warren Township (March 5, 1806), Far Hills (April 7, 1921) and Bernardsville (March 6, 1924).[25] Bernards Township now comprises Basking Ridge, Liberty Corner, Lyons, and West Millington and celebrated its 250th charter anniversary on May 24, 2010.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
CensusPop.
17902,377
18101,876
18202,06310.0%
18302,0620%
18403,98693.3%
18502,267−43.1%
18602,4719.0%
18702,369−4.1%
18802,62210.7%
18902,558−2.4%
19003,06619.9%
19104,60850.3%
19204,243−7.9%
19302,293*−46.0%
19404,51296.8%
19507,48765.9%
19609,01820.4%
197013,30547.5%
198012,920−2.9%
199017,19933.1%
200024,57542.9%
201026,6528.5%
Est. 201226,833[12]0.7%
Population sources:
1790-1920[26] 1840[27] 1850-1870[28]
1850[29] 1870[30] 1880-1890[31]
1890-1910[32] 1910-1930[33]
1930-1990[34] 2000[35][36] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[25]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 26,652 people, 9,783 households, and 6,897 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,113.6 inhabitants per square mile (430.0 /km2). There were 10,103 housing units at an average density of 422.1 per square mile (163.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 81.83% (21,809) White, 1.89% (504) Black or African American, 0.08% (20) Native American, 13.80% (3,679) Asian, 0.03% (7) Pacific Islander, 0.55% (147) from other races, and 1.82% (486) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.95% (1,054) of the population.[9]

There were 9,783 households of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.5% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.27.[9]

In the township, 28.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 20.6% from 25 to 44, 32.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.1 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.5 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $123,285 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,030) and the median family income was $153,906 (+/- $14,565). Males had a median income of $123,390 (+/- $9,621) versus $86,272 (+/- $9,195) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $67,809 (+/- $4,972). About 2.1% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.[37]

Census 2000[edit]

At the 2000 United States Census[19] there were 24,575 people, 9,242 households and 6,487 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,023.8 per square mile (395.4/km²). There were 9,485 housing units at an average density of 395.1 per square mile (152.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 89.20% White, 1.44% African American, 0.05% Native American, 7.85% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.40% from other races, and 1.05% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.63% of the population.[35][36]

There were 9,242 households of which 37.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.0% were married couples living together, 5.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.8% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.17.[35][36]

Age distribution was 27.7% under the age of 18, 3.2% from 18 to 24, 31.2% from 25 to 44, 25.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.0 males.[35][36]

The median income for a household in the township was $107,204, and the median income for a family was $135,806. Males had a median income of $95,758 versus $60,865 for females. The per capita income for the township was $56,521. About 0.6% of families and 1.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.[35][36]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Bernards Township operates under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government. The Township Committee consists of five members, elected by the public at-large in partisan elections for three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[7] In the Township Committee form of government, all legislative and executive powers of the Township are the responsibility of the Township Committee, except in matters of health. The Mayor is elected by the committee from among its members at the annual Reorganization meeting held in January. In the Township Committee form of government, all members have equal power and may vote on all issues.

As of 2013, members of the Township Committee are Mayor Carolyn Gaziano (R, term as mayor ends December 31, 2013; term on committee ends in 2015), Deputy Mayor John Carpenter (R, term as deputy mayor ends in 2013; term on committee ends in 2014), Carol Bianchi (R, 2013), John Malay (R, 2015), and Mary Pavlini (R, 2014).[4][38][39][40] Carol Bianchi was appointed in August 2013 to fill the vacant Township Committee seat expiring on December 31, 2013, following the resignation of Scott Spitzer earlier that month.[41]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Bernards Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 21st state legislative district.[10][43][44] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Bernards Township had been in the 16th state legislative district.[45] Prior to the 2010 Census, Bernards Township had been part of the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[45]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[47][48] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[49][50]

The 21st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Thomas Kean, Jr. (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[54] As of 2013, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Peter S. Palmer (R, Bernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[55] Freeholder Deputy Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015).[56] Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[57] Patricia L. Walsh (R, Green Brook Township, 2013),[58] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[59][60][61] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[62] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2013)[63][64] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[65]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 18,377 registered voters in Bernards Township, of which 3,544 (19.3% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 7,019 (38.2% vs. 25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 7,803 (42.5% vs. 48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 11 voters registered to other parties.[66] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 69.0% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 96.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[66][67]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 8,078 votes here (56.1% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 6,143 votes (42.6% vs. 52.1%) and other candidates with 99 votes (0.7% vs. 1.1%), among the 14,405 ballots cast by the township's 18,039 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.9% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[68] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 8,364 votes here (60.6% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 5,317 votes (38.5% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 84 votes (0.6% vs. 0.9%), among the 13,812 ballots cast by the township's 16,534 registered voters, for a turnout of 83.5% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[69]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 6,124 votes here (59.5% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 2,639 votes (25.6% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 1,427 votes (13.9% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 33 votes (0.3% vs. 0.7%), among the 10,293 ballots cast by the township's 18,244 registered voters, yielding a 56.4% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[70]

Partnership with Terrebonne Parish[edit]

In 2005, after Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita, which had a devastating effect on the area, locals from the Bernards Township sent truckloads of much-needed supplies to assist residents of Houma, Louisiana. In 2007, the Parish returned the favor by sending The Terrebonne High School Marching band on a 26-hour bus ride to the Bernards Township to march in their Christmas parade, and perform a Christmas concert for the public at a local church.[71]

Business and industry[edit]

The headquarters of Avaya, Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, Fedders, Hitachi Power Systems USA[72] and Verizon Wireless are located in the township. Verizon Communications, which technically keeps its world headquarters in New York City, has located operations of its major business units in buildings that were formerly AT&T's world headquarters.[73]

Education[edit]

Students in kindergarten through twelfth grade are educated by the Bernards Township School District. The schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[74]) are Cedar Hill Elementary School[75] (grades K-5; 607 students), Liberty Corner Elementary School[76] (K-5; 562), Mount Prospect Elementary School[77] (PreK-5; 678), Oak Street Elementary School[78] (K-5; 624) William Annin Middle School[79] (6-8; 1,428) and Ridge High School[80] (9-12; 1,729).[81][82] Cedar Hill Elementary houses a state-of-the-art public program for children on the autism spectrum, utilizing the principles of applied behavior analysis.[83]

Ridge High School was ranked 194th, the second-highest in New Jersey, in Newsweek magazine's 2010 rankings of America's Best High Schools.[84] The school was the 9th-ranked public high school in New Jersey out of 328 schools statewide, in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2010 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", after being ranked 12th in 2010 out of 322 schools.[85]

Pingry School, a private coeducational college preparatory day school, has its upper campus, for grades 6 to 12, located in Basking Ridge (prior to 2013 the campus had been listed as being located in Martinsville).[86]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 138.86 miles (223.47 km) of roadways, of which 109.20 miles (175.74 km) are maintained by the municipality, 21.13 miles (34.01 km) by Somerset County and 8.53 miles (13.73 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[87]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit train service is available at the Basking Ridge station[88] and Lyons station[89] on the Gladstone Branch, providing service between Gladstone and Hoboken Terminal.[90]

New Jersey Transit provides local bus service on the MCM8 route.[91]

Points of interest[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Bernards Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Township Committee, Bernards Township. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  5. ^ Administration, Bernards Township. Accessed July 4, 2012.
  6. ^ Municipal Clerk, Bernards Township. Accessed July 4, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 77.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Bernards, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Bernards township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Bernards township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 4, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Basking Ridge, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Liberty Corner, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  16. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Lyons, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  17. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Far Hills, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  18. ^ Cheselow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In: Basking Ridge, N.J.;A Rich Hamlet That Gobbled Up a Town", The New York Times, November 19, 1995. Accessed July 4, 2012. "But over two centuries, about 95 percent of the township became known as Basking Ridge and has a Basking Ridge postal address.... The only major parts of Bernards that do not have Basking Ridge addresses are the Veterans Administration Hospital, opened in 1930, where disabled veterans and staff are housed, and Liberty Corner, a small historic district in the southern section of the township."
  19. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 4, 2012.
  21. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  22. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 4, 2012.
  23. ^ O'Brien, Walter. "A GUIDE TO BERNARDS: Rich in history, Bernards takes pride in modern prosperity", Courier-News, August 22, 2007. Accessed July 4, 2012. "Basking Ridge, Liberty Corner, Lyons and West Millington remain unincorporated areas inside Bernards."
  24. ^ a b Sadlouskos, Linda. "250th anniversary tea to celebrate Bernards history", Courier News (New Jersey), January 6, 2010. Accessed March 22, 2011. "The events commemorate the 250th anniversary of the granting of a charter from British King George II to create the township of Bernardston, Kennedy said."
  25. ^ a b John P. Snyder The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 222.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  27. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  28. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 258, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 10, 2013. "Bernards township is on the north branch of the Raritan river opposite Bedminster The population of this township was in 1850, 2,267; in 1860, 2,471; and in 1870, 2,369."
  29. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  30. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  31. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  32. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  33. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  34. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  35. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Bernards township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  36. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Bedminster township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  37. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Bernards township, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 4, 2012.
  38. ^ WINNERS LIST; Somerset County - General Election November 6, 2012, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  39. ^ WINNERS LIST; Somerset County - General Election November 8, 2011, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  40. ^ SOMERSET COUNTY General Election November 2, 2010 - WINNERS LIST, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  41. ^ Perry, W. Jacob. "Bianchi gets nod for open seat in Bernards Township", The Bernardsville News, September 6, 2013. Accessed September 10, 2013. "Republican Township Committee candidate Carol Bianchi, who had hoped to join the governing body next January, became an incumbent on Tuesday, Aug. 27, when she was appointed to fill a vacancy. Bianchi filled an opening left by the Aug. 9 resignation of fellow Republican Scott Spitzer, with the committee voting 4-0 to select her from a list of three candidates submitted by the Republican Municipal Committee (RMC)."
  42. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  47. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ via Associated Press. "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in", NJ.com, October 31, 2013. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  49. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  50. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  52. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  54. ^ Somerset County Government: At Your Service, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  55. ^ Peter S. Palmer, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  56. ^ Patrick Scaglione, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013. A term-end year of 2012 is listed as of date accessed.
  57. ^ Mark Caliguire, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013. A term-end year of 2012 is listed as of date accessed.
  58. ^ Patricia Walsh, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  59. ^ Robert Zaborowski, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  60. ^ Somerset County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  61. ^ Wichert, Bill. "Somerset Freeholders name Peter Palmer as director, Patrick Scaglione as deputy director ", The Star-Ledger, January 4, 2013. Accessed January 10, 2013. "Joined by family, friends and elected officials at the state and local levels, the county freeholders tapped Palmer to serve as director in 2013 and named Patrick Scaglione as deputy director. Scaglione and Freeholder Mark Caliguire, both Republicans, also were sworn in today to new three-year terms."
  62. ^ Biography: Somerset County Clerk Brett A. Radi, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  63. ^ Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano, Somerset County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  64. ^ Sheriff, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  65. ^ Somerset County Surrogate, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  66. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Somerset, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  67. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 10, 2013.
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