Belton, Texas

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Belton, Texas
—  City  —
Downtown Belton near Bell County Courthouse
Nickname(s): Beltown
Location of Belton, Texas
Coordinates: 31°3′32″N 97°27′48″W / 31.05889°N 97.46333°W / 31.05889; -97.46333Coordinates: 31°3′32″N 97°27′48″W / 31.05889°N 97.46333°W / 31.05889; -97.46333
CountryUnited States
StateTexas
CountyBell
Area
 • Total13.2 sq mi (34.1 km2)
 • Land12.5 sq mi (32.3 km2)
 • Water0.7 sq mi (1.7 km2)
Elevation509 ft (155 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total18,216
 • Density1,171.3/sq mi (452.2/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code76513
Area code(s)254
FIPS code48-07492[1]
GNIS feature ID1351858[2]
 
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Belton, Texas
—  City  —
Downtown Belton near Bell County Courthouse
Nickname(s): Beltown
Location of Belton, Texas
Coordinates: 31°3′32″N 97°27′48″W / 31.05889°N 97.46333°W / 31.05889; -97.46333Coordinates: 31°3′32″N 97°27′48″W / 31.05889°N 97.46333°W / 31.05889; -97.46333
CountryUnited States
StateTexas
CountyBell
Area
 • Total13.2 sq mi (34.1 km2)
 • Land12.5 sq mi (32.3 km2)
 • Water0.7 sq mi (1.7 km2)
Elevation509 ft (155 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total18,216
 • Density1,171.3/sq mi (452.2/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code76513
Area code(s)254
FIPS code48-07492[1]
GNIS feature ID1351858[2]
The Bell County Courthouse
The Workforce Solutions of Central Texas office in Belton
University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, once known as the "Female Baylor" is located in Belton.
Map of the city in 1881

Belton is a city in Bell County, Texas, United States. It is the county seat of Bell County[3].

Belton is part of the Killeen – Temple – Fort Hood metropolitan area.

Contents

Geography

Belton is located at 31°3′32″N 97°27′48″W / 31.05889°N 97.46333°W / 31.05889; -97.46333 (31.058904, -97.463382)[4].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.2 square miles (34 km2), of which, 12.5 square miles (32 km2) of it is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km2) of it (5.09%) is water.

Belton is just south of Temple and north of Salado on Interstate 35.

History

Belton was platted in 1850 with the name of Nolandville. It was given its current name in 1851, named after Texas' Governor, Peter Hansborough Bell. As the county seat of the like named Bell County the town seemed destined for growth. The 1880s marked the town's brightest age, with the building of the courthouse, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor buildings, and a "railroad war" in which, by 1881, Belton was bypassed by the railroad which built Temple, Texas as the local junction and depot town. In 1913 the city experienced a major flood.[5] leading to the naming of Yettie Polk Park, from one of those who died. The town began to thrive following the creation of Fort Hood in 1942.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2010, there were 18,216 people and 5,380 households within the city, a 24.6% population growth from the 2000 census. The population density was 926.3 people per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 74.50% White, 8.10% African American, 0.90% Native American, 1.60% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 14.70% from other races, and 3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 29.10% of the population.

Out of 6,612 households in the city, 25.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them. 10.9% households were occupied by someone of 65 years and older. Multi-unit housing made up 30.20% of the households, and the homeownership rate was at 53.60%, which is 11.20% behind the state-wide average. The average household size was 2.73.

In the city, children of under 10 years old made up 14.90% of the population. Persons from 10 to 19 made up 16.70%, 20 to 29 made up 19.60%, 30 to 39 made up 11.60%, 40 to 49 made up 11.2%, 50 to 59 made up 10.80%, 60 to 69 made up 7.50%, and those 70 and older made up 7.75. The median age was 29.9 years.

The median income for a household in the city was $47,814. The per capita income for the city was $20,847. 18.7% of the city's population was below the poverty line.

Education

The City of Belton is served by the following Belton Independent School District schools:.

Belton is also home to the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, a private university affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas.[6][7] As of 2010, UMHB has an enrollment of 2,956.[8]

Sites of interest

The Bell County Museum is a Carnegie-funded structure.
Chuckwagon exhibit at Bell County Museum; the chuckwagon was invented by Texas cattleman Charles Goodnight.

The Bell County Expo Center is located in Belton and is the home of the CenTex Barracudas Indoor football team.

First Baptist Church of Belton
First Christian Church-next to the Bell County Courthouse.

For recreation, Belton has two major lakes: Belton Lake and Stillhouse Hollow Lake. There is also a water park, Summer Fun Water Park. Another notable recreation point is BLORA which is part of Ft. Hood and is located on Lake Belton

Belton is also home to a number of historic churches including First United Methodist Church, founded in 1850 and First Baptist Church, founded in 1853.

Notable people

Football player David Ash is the starting quarterback for The University of Texas' football team.

Musician Danny Barnes is from Belton.

Actor George Eads grew up in Belton. He graduated from Belton High School in 1985.

Historian and rancher J. Evetts Haley was born in Belton and is buried beside his first wife, Nita Stewart Haley, in the Moffat Cemetery. However, he spent most of his life in Midland and Canyon in West Texas.

Musician Chris Marion of classic rock's Little River Band was born in Belton in 1962.

Bass player Pat Seals from the alternative rock band Flyleaf is from Belton.

Physician W. Roy Smythe, M.D., Chairman of Surgery for Scott & White Memorial Hospital, the Scott & White Healthcare system and the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, grew up in Belton, and graduated from Belton High School in 1978.

General Walton Walker, the 8th Army Commander killed in action in the Korean War was born in Belton on December 3, 1889.

Henry T. Waskow, the basis of a famous article by Ernie Pyle, was a Belton native.

Actor Rudy Youngblood of Mel Gibson's film, Apocalypto, graduated from Belton High School.

George Jo Hennard shouted "This is what Bell County did to me!" immediately before commencing the Luby's massacre.[9][10][11]

Culture

Belton Lake and Dam

Home of the Texas Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame housed in the Bell County Expo Center.

Footnotes

External links